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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's terrific, anyway
For those of you who hoped that Uriel's Machine was one of the several items discovered in the basement of Rosslyn Chapel......it isn't. (It isn't even a machine.) Except for a short update in the appendix about the progress of the Rosslyn Chapel dig, this book has little or nothing to do with the intriguing theme of the authors' previous two books, The Hiram Key, and The...
Published on 3 July 1999

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Few Good Bits But be Prepared to Skim a Lot
I bought this when it first came out. I recently dragged it out while having a clear out and had a quick look. There were some interesting things in it but in the end I decided to get rid of it.

The text is very dense and I did not understand a lot of it but I will summerise quickly what I did understand.
The authors posit:
That there was an anciant...
Published on 14 July 2012 by RL


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1.0 out of 5 stars What a mix of stuff!, 13 Feb 2014
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J. R. Scott - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science (Paperback)
It's all over the place, with myth mixed with tradition, some pseudo-science and some outright clangers. There is a bit of truth in it, but not that much.

Mildly amusing, if you have the time to read it all.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Fun Fiction, 5 Dec 2013
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H. Marshall (Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science (Paperback)
Some interesting ideas and the first half of the book is a fun read. But due to missing out any science that doesnt fit and leaping to some rather far fetched conclusions the book starts to become a bit silly. Their original guesses at what things may mean are fair enough but the fact they accept the baseless ideas as fact, then proceed to found other assumptions and ideas on those 'facts' means it gets farther and farther away from being in any way sensible until credulity is stretched way too far. The science they quote is often wrong, outdated or misquoted but by far the biggest failure of the book is the glossing over of the giant guesses they make then presenting the same ideas as fact a few paragraphs later. A discerning reader will spot these points right away, but the less alert will believe they have read ideas supported by science and fact which sadly in a lot of this book isnt the case. It is always nice to hear new ideas though and when it comes to ancient history even the most 'scientific' report is generally very biased by the authors own beliefs or aims. Just because the authors have specifically led the book (and reader) down a certain path doesnt necessarily mean it is wrong but for me it became rather like a house of cards built on so many guesses that if just one is flawed the whole premise collapses. Having said all that, opening history up to different viewpoints is always a valuable exercise as long as the reader has the sense to check things out and draw their own conclusions rather than being led.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heading in the right direction, 22 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science (Paperback)
This book covers so many areas - geographic, subject-matter and spacial that it is quite easy to lose track of the main story. However, on saying that, the authors have explained their theories at length and have provided proof wherever possible.
The sheer audacity of some of these theories makes for some very interesting and, for me, exciting reading. I believe that humanity needs people like the authors to inject fresh ideas into the past to enable us to solve some semingly quite extraordinary riddles with any degree of accuracy. Just how do they come up with those theories of theirs?
Pre-history will never be the same for me again!
Good work and a good read.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good combination of scripture/myth and scientific analysis, 15 Jan 2000
By A Customer
The combination of textual analysis, including research into biblical scriptures, masonic history (all well covered in their other titles), together with hard scientific evidence is enough to convince even the most sceptical reader that there is at least something missing from the existing orthodox 'history' of our species and this planet.
Perhaps the most telling part of this book is the final page, where Knight and Lomas consider that the further questions that they raised during their research are perhaps more important than the 'conclusions' they reached.
Much of the evidence is compelling, more is persuasive yet not conclusive and little is without any merit. Read the book, and reach your own conclusions.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An hour later you're hungry again., 5 Aug 1999
By A Customer
Having enjoyed Second Messiah, I wanted to be amazed by the authors' interpretations of the megalithic sites and the advanced civilisation before the flood. The proof of comet strikes was clever, but surely there would be more evidence of seven impacts than a blip in Earth's magnetic field? Couldn't solar flares do that? Interesting, but...
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last a Sensible theory about the Megaliths, 12 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science (Paperback)
This is a fascinating book about the Ancient Origins of Science. The authors make a convincing case that technology started along the Northern coast of Europe long before the cities of the middle east were even thought of. The reason we have lost the story, Lomas and Knight retell here, is because the hero scientist-priests they tell us about never learned how to write, at least not anything we could read.
It's a wonderful book and just makes so much sense of the megalithic structures which still litter Britain
Keep up the good work lads!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Evidence for the Megalithic Yard is astounding!, 11 Nov 1999
The most important finding in this new offering from Lomas and Knight is the evidence they present for the accuarcy and means of transmitting the Megalithic yard. This highly accurate unit of measure was used throughout the west of Europe and was accurate to a hundredth part of an inch. Nobody before has offered such a clear and testable explanation for how it was developed and used. Even Prof Thom, who discovered it and spend years charting where it was used never offered any explanation for it. Lomas and Knight tell you how to create a megalithic yard and when you try their method it works.
All they use is observational astronomy. No Aliens, No angels and nothing supernatural.
Read it just to understand the marvellous measurement technology of the Grooved Ware poeple that they describe so well.
Definately their best book to date.
I saw them speaking at the Orkney Science Festival last September and when Lomas gave a practical demonstration of how to create a megalithic yard from only the simpliest objects you could hear the lecture theatre gasp in astonishment.
And its a really good read too!
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Striking Evidence of Comets!!, 29 Nov 1999
By A Customer
Lomas and Knight have brought together at least five strands of evidence why all point to major cometary impacts within the last 10,000 years. The tektites, tree rings, ice cores, sea bed cores and blips in the earth's magnetic field all point the same way.
They have made sense of Thom's work in Megalithic Sites of Britain, by explaining the how the Meglithic yard can be reproduced just from observational astronomer.
You don't need to take pinches of slat with this book they have explained how they carried out their experiements ad you can repeat them for your self. I did and they are right about the unit of length and its derivation.
Uriel's Machine does a great job trying to fill in the blanks in history and frm what I saw in the Sunday TImes this week the governement is taking their theory of cometary impacts serisouly enough to set up an observatory to watch out for more likely impactors.
This book is an excellent read and a real warning to take the likeilhood of an impact from space seriously.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a compelling insight into Megalithic culture, 8 Nov 2000
By A Customer
I use this book frequently as a source of information about early use of stone circles and dolmens, not as we used to believe as burial mounds, but as sophisticated measuring instruments. I teach philosophy and to show how science and archaeology get things wrong it is a wonderful source of knowledge and inspiration.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A serious, well researched and argued book., 4 Jan 2010
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This review is from: Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science (Paperback)
This book is meticulously argued, and brings together a range of disciplines and an open minded approach not normally associated with the analysis of history. The format of providing a conclusion/summary for each chapter is initially helpful, although much of the flavour of the argument is lost if one were to read only these conclusions.

The authors bring together disciplines such as astronomy, archaeology, anthropology, theology and narrative analysis and analyse and set these within a historical context. The complex information is made accessible and clear

This book presents a challenge to accepted paradigms, and is understandably controversial, but to the open minded, prepared to consider well researched and evidenced ideas from a pair of well established writers, the contents make a huge amount of sense, providing reasoned and rational argument throughout.

The quality of this work is most clearly displayed in its' non judgmental attitude to history. This book should be read by christians as well as by scientists and those of any other leaning.

Highly recommended.
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Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science
Uriel's Machine: The Ancient Origins of Science by Robert Lomas (Paperback - 5 Oct 2000)
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