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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing completion of the series
I enjoyed this volume as much as the others in the series, and shall certainly go back and reread the whole thing now it is complete.
McCollough offers some interesting explanations for events which are consistent with character and history but different from the standard ones - for example her explanation of the character and motivations of Cleopatra and her...
Published on 28 Jan. 2003 by alexandria1121

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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The end at last!
So, here it is. Must be nearly 10 years since I read 'The First Man in Rome' and so started on Colleen McCullough's 'Masters of Rome' series. Now, at last, the whole lot can be viewed as one.

This one follows right after the last, there's no annoying 5 year gap like there was between 'Caesar's Women' and 'Caesar' If you know anything about history (or even if...
Published on 24 Oct. 2003 by S. Flaherty


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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pure entertainment, 8 July 2008
By 
Adam Graham Malster (Taiwan) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The October Horse (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
This is a great book and a fine series of novels. I can't wait to read the final installment "Anthony and Cleopatra". The scope of this story is amazing. Africa, Syria, Egypt, Italy and Gaul are but a few of the locations for the action besides Rome. When you take into account what McCullough covers in the five novels previous to this it is indeed astounding.

To write a review here is almost to repeat what I said in my review for McCullough's Caesar. I have big problems with her description of Caesar as a superhuman force for good. There is definitely a lot of hero worship going on here. Despite an heroic description of Cato's march in Africa I think that the Republicans come off much too poorly for people who must have had their fair share of skill and intelligence. I'm sure that nobody in the ruling oligarchy had truly noble intentions but we are lead to believe that Caesar did.

Despite McCullough's obvious love for Caesar above all others I still really enjoyed the book and the series. By putting aside what I took to be the author's personal feelings about the characters I was able to learn an awful lot.

While McCullough's weakness is her pedestrian narrative her great strength is her knowledge and attention to detail. Overall I am grateful to her for expanding my knowledge of history and inspiring my interest in all things Roman.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I was very sad to read that Colleen McCullough had died in January, 22 Mar. 2015
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I was very sad to read that Colleen McCullough had died in January. I thought that I had read all of her Masters of Rome series and was delighted to discover that I had not read, The October Horse. If you like historical accuracy combined with entertaining and engrossing prose then this is a book for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The story continues, 4 May 2014
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Colleen McCullough has yet again excelled herself with the continuance of the story about the 'Masters of Rome'. This book continues with what happened after Caesar had been killed and the beginning of Octavian fight to be recognised as Caesar's heir.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good!, 27 Sept. 2010
This review is from: The October Horse (Masters of Rome) (Paperback)
The October Horse was a bit of a slog to be honest certainly once Caesar was gone and the center moved to Octavian. It became a case of he did that or they did that with little in the way of any dialogue. Still a good read though.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect ending to the Masters of Rome series., 22 Dec. 2002
By A Customer
I had forgotten how much I disliked Ancient Rome until I read this book. It gives such a detailed description of how the Republic disintegrated into something quite different and very disgusting. What most impressed me was how the author managed to translate this disintegration into the gradual falling apart of Caesar (heading into a very modern burn out if you ask me) and the survival battle of Octavianus (the archetypical emperor)after his death. Beautifull. I really hope Colleen McCullough will continue her Rome's series, but then, concentrating on the dark twilight area between the end of the empire and the beginning of the Middle Ages. That is another period in history that hasn't gotten much litterary attention.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good book, 1 May 2003
By A Customer
I have read and enjoyed all of the books of Colleen McCullough's First Man in Rome series. I enjoyed this book as well, but not as well as the others. However, I attribute this to the material and not to a detoriation of McCullough's historical and authorship abilities. In the earlier books the Republic is alive and vital, and I loved learning about the individual careers of so many politicans and generals and commoners and foreigners of varying influence and importance. But as the series proceeded into the crumbling of the Republic, the novels loose some vitality as they focus more and more on Caesar and only Caesar. Perhaps, as McCullough's Caesar said, it is hard to shine when all your rivals are gone.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Roman novel, 11 April 2014
By 
Stephen M. Lock "Hendonman" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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Great Roman novel and enjoyed very much. A great intro to McCulloch's writing and she has provided me with a lot of enjoyable reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fitting finish to a work of genius, 30 Sept. 2014
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I read all of these books in less than 2 months.This is historical novel writing at its height! Going to miss these novels.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Great but have missed out/changed crucial passages, 14 Jun. 2014
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Fantastic, although as its abridged they miss out crucial parts such as Catos motivations and life which is a shame
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great finale to a great series, 24 Nov. 2002
By A Customer
Colleen McCullough's final book in the Masters Of Rome series has been a long time coming, but it's certainly been worth the wait.
Covering the last days of the Roman Republic, perhaps the most fascinating time in recorded history, we see the downfall of Caesar and the beginnings of the struggle to succeed him.
The brilliant characterisations of the main players - Caesar, Cato, Cleopatra, Marcus Brutus, Servilia, Octavian, and Marcus Antonius - allows the incorporation of a stunning amount of detail without ever getting bogged down. The essence of Rome permeates through each and every of the 750 pages.
No matter how ruthless the characters can be, or how well known are their fates, you will hardly put this book down.
The October Horse manages to stand on its own as a single novel, but is best read in conjunction with, at least, the previous book, Caesar.
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The October Horse (Masters of Rome)
The October Horse (Masters of Rome) by Colleen McCullough Doctor of Neurophysiology (Paperback - 7 Aug. 2003)
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