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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great!
Servant of the Bones is quite different from how you would percieve a typical Anne Rice book... no vampires for one thing... but I loved it! It details the life of Azriel, born in biblical times and his belief in a god that leads up to him being sacrificed for a faith he doesn't follow ... it's extremely moving, very sad story, but that's just the beginning of the...
Published on 28 April 2000

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1.0 out of 5 stars Them bones, them bones, them gold bones
Anne Rice boldly goes where she's gone before in "Servant of the Bones," a flaccid deviation from her Vampire Chronicles. Rice's plot has some raw promise, but it's quickly squandered by the dull characters and meandering, bizarre plot. It would take all of a genii's power to give some life to this story.

A genii arrives at a man's house one night, and...
Published 5 months ago by E. A Solinas


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great!, 28 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
Servant of the Bones is quite different from how you would percieve a typical Anne Rice book... no vampires for one thing... but I loved it! It details the life of Azriel, born in biblical times and his belief in a god that leads up to him being sacrificed for a faith he doesn't follow ... it's extremely moving, very sad story, but that's just the beginning of the book! The novel goes on to describe how Azriel becomes a spirit, the servant of the bones, for whoever owns his bones has mastery over him. Over many centuries and many countries serving many different masters, the tale finally concludes in modern-day New York. It's a great book, and I would recommend it to everyone!
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of her best!, 26 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
Being a fan of the Vampire Chronicles (the 3 first books are brilliant!)I was pleasantly surprised by this variation. The book tells the story of Azriel, a young Babylonian man who dies and becomes a kind of genie, condemned to serve those who own his bones. It's a great story - very original- and sometimes very moving, that ends up being a great lesson about life. Recommended reading you all!
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1.0 out of 5 stars Them bones, them bones, them gold bones, 11 Jan. 2015
By 
EA Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
Anne Rice boldly goes where she's gone before in "Servant of the Bones," a flaccid deviation from her Vampire Chronicles. Rice's plot has some raw promise, but it's quickly squandered by the dull characters and meandering, bizarre plot. It would take all of a genii's power to give some life to this story.

A genii arrives at a man's house one night, and relates the story of his life (and afterlife), and a weird tale it is too. Azriel was a young Jewish boy in Babylon, who had the unusual gift of being able to talk to the god Marduk.

He permitted himself to be turned into a living gold statue, a human sacrifice for the sake of the Jews -- but things go horribly wrong when an old witch curses and murders him. Now he is no longer human, but a powerful spirit that isn't an angel or a demon.

Azriel spends centuries sleeping inside his own gold-encrusted bones, occasionally getting woken up to do something for his masters. Then he's suddenly out and about -- and there's no master. He witnesses the murder of a young girl, who recognizes him as "the Servant of the Bones." The angry Azriel is determined to unravel the mystery of why the girl was murdered.

"Servant of the Bones" follows the format of the Vampire Chronicles: an incredibly attractive immortal relates his life story to a listener (who, oddly enough, never seems to need the bathroom during the long oral bio). But the grandeur and richness of her other writings is missing here.

Rice seems to be aware that her plot is too short and thin to be an entire novel. So she stretches it with lots of filler -- current events (no Bill-Clinton worship, please), her late husband's incomprehensible poetry, and endless descriptions of Azriel's skin, hair and eyes. Her usually colorful, sensuous prose is weirdly lifeless and dull here. And the plot is glacially slow.

Most strangely of all, Rice starts playing fast and loose with religion and history. And devout followers of Judaism will probably be grinding their teeth: the faithful are shown as self-righteous, slobbering fanatics, while the hero worships other gods and shares prostitutes with his dad. She bangs readers over the head with her assertions that there were many versions of the Old Testament. And Rice tries to bring Azriel to the present by a story-line about terrorists, murder and a cult, but the present-day story-line feels tacked-on. It's like a supernatural Bond flick.

But it doesn't exactly help that Azriel is not a terribly interesting character at all. Over the centuries he never develops a personality, and his actions seem pretty random. Why is he so besotted with Esther? We never know. The villain is cookie-cutter, and most of the supporting characters (including the narrator) are utterly forgettable.

This story is a complete misfire for Rice, and a bewildering squandering of her talents. Her dull characters and weird views on Old Testament history are only a few of the problems in the turgid, colorless "Servant of the Bones."
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5.0 out of 5 stars Azriel, our hero, is telling his story to Jonathan, a history professor, 2 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
The first 50 or so pages were a little slow, but then I was hooked and didn't want to put it down. Definitely not a light read. It's about a man in ancient middle east who ends up being used in a ceremony to replace a god--they paint his body with "gold" and let it harden to make him a statue. Before the gold killed him, he was burnt alive and his spirit remained with his golden bones to be controlled as a killing spirit by whoever figured out how to release his spirit from the bones. It ends up being about his transition from being controlled by the bones to controlling them himself and learning to manifest his powers through love and mercy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Spirit World brought to life, 25 Mar. 2011
By 
Lee Hanley (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
What I like about Anne Rice is that she can bring to life a complex concept such as the spirit world and describe it in a totally believable and functioning manner. You begin to think that it could actually work in the way she envisions it and it becomes very real.

On top of that is an excellent story, initially an enjoyable rendering of Babylon and the Persian empire under Cyrus. In the middle of the book it drifts a little with a big time gap in Azrael's existence and then a slow build up to the final part. This eventually becomes a gripping and suspenseful story which has an excellent finish.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars He enfolded her in his muscular arms etc etc..., 3 Oct. 2005
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
This book is a reasonably entertaining read, but I can't help but feel that Anne Rice is kind of like the Jilly Cooper of the supernatural novel world.
She picks up a few tropes of mythology from somewhere and uses it as a peg to hang a romantic novel on. That said, there are some good ideas going on here, the king for a day sacrifice used for the creation of an indestructible djinn. However, the plot is not so very far away from that of her vampire chronicles (mortal being, made into an immortal demon/vampire/spirit, experiences things humans can only dream about - exists for centuries etc gets involved in ever more melodramatic goings on until the whole thing erupts into a welter of grande guignol and bad dialogue). There's also the whole business with the cult which gets very silly indeed towards the end.
Although I might add that the spirit in this, against all probability, does actually manage to get his end away at one point and the description of the 'ahem' physical act of love verges on the unintentionally hilarious.
Whilst reading I can never quite get the image of Matt Lucas as Barbara Cartland out of my head: "And he took her in his arms and kissed her... the end!"
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5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book, 24 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
I loved it the first time I read it, years ago on loan, but couldn't remember who wrote it and wasn't sure of the title even though I remembered the story in great detail. So when I came across it I snapped it up. Then I found another copy in a bag of books someone gave me. I've taken that one to my house in France so that I can read it again whenever the fancy takes me. I re-read favourite books many times and this one fits that category.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A New Kind of Romanticism., 9 Oct. 2004
By 
Luke Dunn (Ramsgate, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
Anne Rice has found a way in her books to resurrect the ancient and medieval worldviews of spirits, angels , gods and magic. She explores the humanity of characters against the backdrop of the old pantheons. There is a compelling kind of internal logic to all her stories and this one has it too. Servant of the Bones shows us how a spiritual entity who is immortal but chained to his bones like a genie to a lamp would actually feel.
In a strange way the message becomes one with which the reader is already familiar. There is a human truth to the story, which the supernatural elements surround like a mounted gem. If science fiction is about asking "what if?" then Rice's work is a "what if?" centered around her favourite themes of the supernatural, a belief system that has belonged to human beings for most of our history. While science has crowded out the possibility of believing in this stuff for many of us, Rice's work gives us a chance to live in the older world through her fictionalisation, and it answers a great need for mystery and myth. A really excellent read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Started well but disappointing ending, 21 July 2008
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
I am a fan of the vampire chronicles decided to read Servant Of The Bones because it seemed to keep to the mythology theme i enjoy.
It started well with all the 'olden time' tales that include religion, magic and curses. After you are given the intriging back story of his life and how he is passed onto his first master, Rice seems to give no imagination to his other masters or their story and can't wait to skip the book to modern day New York. The book becomes boring and predictable and I found myself skipping through the last half of the book to an ending I saw coming a while ago. Very disappointing after such an interesting start to the book.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 28 Dec. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Servant Of The Bones (Paperback)
Maybe because I expected too much of one of my favourite writers, but it disappointed me. It took me three other books before I could finish this one, and no translator could be blame, as I read it in its original language... The prose has all Rice's hallmarks, her descriptions are as good as always, but the story lacks of interest too often, and the end its quick and unbeliveable. And just a personal question... why Gregory simply does not like Spain? Well, coming from him it is quite a compliment.
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Servant Of The Bones
Servant Of The Bones by Anne Rice (Paperback - 7 Aug. 1997)
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