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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Warm and well written
Superficially I have little in common with the Rebecca Winter, main protagonist of this novel – she’s an American urbanite, an artist, a divorced mother - yet I still identified with her concerns and inspirations. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and keep thinking about it. There are some wonderful images and lines I shall remember for a long time.
Published 11 months ago by Mrs H

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still, it is
The flyer to the book uses words like "powerfully observed", "deeply moving", "very funny", "stunningly crafted". If you ignore these hyperbolical adverbs you have, instead, a quiet and pleasant enough read about an older (60yrs) woman's forced change of life from a high flying artist photographer, living in New York, to a 'nobdy' living in...
Published 4 months ago by ABC


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still, it is, 10 Nov. 2014
The flyer to the book uses words like "powerfully observed", "deeply moving", "very funny", "stunningly crafted". If you ignore these hyperbolical adverbs you have, instead, a quiet and pleasant enough read about an older (60yrs) woman's forced change of life from a high flying artist photographer, living in New York, to a 'nobdy' living in the middle of nowhere. The story has all the expected happenings that come with this type of novel. It is harmless, comforting and comfortable despite its few frissons. Oh, and there is quite a lot about roofs as well.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Warm and well written, 13 April 2014
This review is from: Still Life with Bread Crumbs (Hardcover)
Superficially I have little in common with the Rebecca Winter, main protagonist of this novel – she’s an American urbanite, an artist, a divorced mother - yet I still identified with her concerns and inspirations. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and keep thinking about it. There are some wonderful images and lines I shall remember for a long time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Life even in completely unexpected places is offering new chances and it's never too late for love, 15 Feb. 2014
By 
Denis Vukosav - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Still Life with Bread Crumbs (Hardcover)
`Still Life with Bread Crumbs' written by Anna Quindlen is a romantic story about second chances, about never giving up on love, even if it comes to times when it is no longer expected, when we feel that we are no longer able to give ourselves and feel something strong.

The main character, named Rebecca Winter is a jobless photographer who is now sixty and though in the past had been a symbol of feminism, she is now disappointed, lonely, divorced - it seems like she slowly summarizes her life. Rebecca's old parents and son, the only close persons in her life, became a financial burden therefore she will be forced to leave her New York flat and rent a cabin in the wilderness, to rest for a while and try at least a little to fix her financial situation.

Even in such a remote place away from civilization, Rebecca will meet some interesting people of which the most interesting will be Jim Bates, a young roofer. After a lot of time in her life, Rebecca will again experience the passion of life streaming through her body, and as the days go by she will understand a lot about herself and life which offers a lot of ways we can look at it...

Anna Quindlen is a known writer of women's fiction, which is often a bit mockingly called chic-lit due to the stereotypical plots and characters that often can be found in the pages of this kind of literature. With this book the author has managed to go a little deeper and more qualitative in the topics of ageing, loneliness, disappointment with ourselves and the people around us.

Therefore, `Still Life with Bread Crumbs' is more than a love story that will appeal primarily to female audience, it is a book that will convince you that life even in completely unexpected places is offering new chances, and that's never too late for love. Due to these nice messages a popularity of this book is not surprising because there could never be enough of such positive messages in these often sad and lonely times.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Life Is A Story, 30 Jan. 2014
By 
prisrob "pris," (New England USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Still Life with Bread Crumbs (Hardcover)
While I was reading Anna Quindlen's new book I was thinking, 'how does she come up with these characters, and why do I like Rebecca Winter, so much'?. Never in a million years would I have thought of this storyline. Of course, after some thought I realized that Rebecca Winter is a compilation of many of Anna Quindlen's traits.

Rebecca Winter, is a 60-year-old photographer who won photography's highest award for her series 'Still Life with Bread Crumbs,' several years ago. She is the daughter of a woman who did not know how to show much love, but a father who loved her very much. She went to college, became a photographer, focusing on domestic-themed photography. She married a British professor who turned out to be a philanderer, marrying a new woman every ten years. Her son, Ben, is the light of her life, but is now out on his own. Now, here she is 60, her photos not wanted as much, with sky high expenses, her New York City apartment, her mother's nursing home expenses, her dad's apartment, and her own needs.

She rents a house in the woods on a whim, sub-let's her apartment, and off she goes. Unprepared, really for this new life, she enters slowly, all the while wondering what she has done. What struck me about Rebecca is how much she resembles Anna. She wears only black and white, few colors, she keeps her hair simple, make-up very simple, enjoys the simple life. She learned to cook good food, carry on a professional life and express herself with simplicity.

This is a very fast read, either the characters are good people or not. No real in-between. Mental illness, difficult parents, philandering husband, good son, difficult life situations that are overcome are all introduced. Very well written, but I felt something was missing.

Recommended. prisrob 01-30-14
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable and thought provoking, 16 Feb. 2014
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Perfect read for the mature woman - one can identify with the heroine and identify with her predicament. Interesting developments. and satisfactory ending
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just lovely, 24 April 2014
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I really enjoyed this gentle tale. An unusual theme and characters, but so interesting. It touched my heart and now it's finished I am finding it difficult to 'live' in another novel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars hopeful...but, 13 July 2014
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The theme of an older woman encountering a younger man is welcome. Meeting in out-of-the-way places is interesting, and Still Life with Breadcrumbs is a good summer read.
I happened to be reading Barbara Kingsolver's Prodigal Summer at the same time.
The latter is richer, deeper and more nuanced, but there is a similar theme. Prodigal Summer will stay on my bookshelves for a return read. Still Life will go to Oxfam.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really nice read, 23 April 2014
This is just great writing - an interesting profile of an interesting person, with a good plot underlining it all. Definite recommend.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Memorable, 18 Mar. 2014
By 
Christopher Sullivan (edinburgh) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Still Life with Bread Crumbs (Hardcover)
Sixty year old Rebecca Winter’s Warholian fifteen minutes of fame have elapsed and she is now struggling financially to keep her head above the proverbial water-line. With payments being made for maintenance of the New York flat, nursing home charges where her dementia suffering mother resides and rent for her father’s flat, she decides to lease her high rent New York apartment and rent a ramshackle cottage in an unspecified rural community in the New York State.
Rebecca Winter is a photographer who became well known for a series of photographs entitled The Kitchen Counter series, one of those being known as Still Life with Breadcrumbs. As Rebecca tries to engage with her new surroundings more often than not through hikes in the nearby woodland, she encounters small white crosses with various pieces of memorabilia next to them. As she begins to hunt the woodland for more of these crosses and photograph what she finds she meets Jim Bates sitting on a platform built into the branches of a tree, watching birds of prey and holding what looks like a gun.
This is not a book about a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown. It is not a book about a woman going through a mid-life crisis. It would be very easy and very lazy to read the inside book jacket and come to either of the above conclusions but that would be doing a huge disservice to the author and this book. If the reader was to simply skim read their way through this book, that reader, though enjoying the book, would be missing the myriad of levels and nuances that permeate the book.
Still Life with Breadcrumbs is as elegant and intimate as an Annie Leibovitz photograph but also has the truthfulness of a Diane Arbus.

“ ...”You’re Lucky”, Rebecca had been suspicious of the sentiment, and the intervening years had proved her correct. You’re so lucky, to the couple at an anniversary party who, in private, scarcely spoke. You’re so lucky, to the young mother who heard a stirring and cry at night from the crib and swore she would lose her mind. Lucky from the outside was an illusion.”

(Page 89)

Rebecca Winter attempts to make sense of the world, to define her world, through the lens of her camera. The camera acts as a buffer to the real world beyond her aperture. When photographing the white crosses with their accompanying pieces of memorabilia, trophy, plaster cast of a handprint etc she thinks only in terms of composition, framing, and light. She doesn’t ask why the crosses and memorabilia are there or what they represent. And this thinking occasionally bleeds into her other parts of her life as well and in so doing she misses out on what life has to offer.
Anna Quindlen has an unerring ability to flesh out her characters without appearing to write very much about them. Her style of writing appears deceptively easy and with the least amount of effort. However, as one reads the words the reader finds themselves breathing the same air as the characters; one feels the characters becoming part of one’s DNA.
I will finish the review with a wonderful passage on page 104 that will help display Anna Quindlen’s wonderful prose.

“There are two kinds of men: men who want a wife who is predictable, and men who want a wife who is exotic. For some reason, Peter had thought she was the latter. But even if that had been the case, the problem inherent remains the same – once she becomes a wife, the exotic becomes familiar, and thus predictable, and thus not what was wanted at all. Those few women who stayed exotic usually were considered, after a few years, to be crazy.”

(Page 104)

Number of Pages – 252
Sex Scenes – None
Profanity – None
Genre - Fiction
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable!, 6 April 2014
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This review is from: Still Life with Bread Crumbs (Hardcover)
I have enjoyed Anna Quindlens books since I read Black and Blue years ago. Since then I have read as many of her books as I could. Her writing seems effortless and a pleasure to read. This novel is still as good as her first one. I finished this book in a couple of days, it was so easy to read.
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Still Life with Bread Crumbs
Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen (Hardcover - 30 Jan. 2014)
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