Customer Reviews


62 Reviews
5 star:
 (29)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (12)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing
I must admit at first I was unsure whether to get this book or not as sometimes these 'what if.....?' books are simply awful. I am happy though that I got this one in the end as it is a great read. The title of this book tells you exactly what to expect. Apparently the author got the inspiration from a piece of research where a midwife claimed that she had delivered...
Published on 18 Dec. 2011 by M. Dowden

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth a look!
This is a well written and intriguing book. Definitely a different take on a Tudor story than I had perhaps expected.....going along the "what if?" scenario......does make you think a bit and could that have happened?? I have to confess that it took me a bit to get into the story and my immediate reaction of no way that just would have happened attitude, then I tried to...
Published on 3 Jan. 2012 by Tinksjane


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, 18 Dec. 2011
By 
M. Dowden (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I must admit at first I was unsure whether to get this book or not as sometimes these 'what if.....?' books are simply awful. I am happy though that I got this one in the end as it is a great read. The title of this book tells you exactly what to expect. Apparently the author got the inspiration from a piece of research where a midwife claimed that she had delivered Elizabeth's child. There are still rumours abounding about whether Elizabeth was a virgin and whether she did have a child, especially due to all the gossip there was about Thomas Seymour, Katherine Parr's last husband frolicking with the young princess.

Supposing Elizabeth did have a child at a young age, such a child would have been killed if it survived the birth - but if it managed to live? Elinor de Lacey, or Nell as most call her, is very different from her parents and has flaming red hair. When she works at court she not only has to deal with the intrigues that go on around her, but also has to contend with what she finds out about herself. Could Nell be the Queen's illegitimate daughter? In a world where you can be a Queen's favourite one day, and in the Tower the next, Nell finds that wheels turn within wheels, as her very life could be in danger. You also don't want Walsingham paying attention to you.

Full of intrigue, some romance and seamlessly blending fact with fiction this book is slow to start but gradually pulls you in and holds you throughout. This is well worth reading if you like historical novels, or if you just like something that is full of intrigue.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly well done, 8 Jun. 2013
By 
Bookwoman - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Don't be put off by the cheesy title and premise (what if Elizabeth I's rumoured teenage dalliance with her stepmother's husband had resulted in a child?) because this is surprisingly well done. The cover might give you a clue: far more tasteful than what you usually get (21st century fashion model, face obscured, wearing a push-up bra under a gold-decorated fancy dress costume) on the front of more run-of-the-mill historical chick-lit, this woman could actually have stepped out of the pages of the book.
Once you've decided to go with the premise, the author unravels its consequences very well: both plot and characters are believable and the period detail is good. There's a well-rounded protagonist, Nell de Lacey, whose virtues and faults are very convincing, and it's as authentic-seeming a depiction of the Queen and her court as I've ever come across in a novel.
And all too often, in books like this, the introduction of real characters like Cecil, Walsingham and Dr John Dee can be clunky and distracting, but this author has mixed them in seamlessly with the fictional characters so it adds to the plausibility of the story. She also gives us some very real and touching portrayals of different types of mother/daughter relationship throughout.
It's not quite a five star read for me - there are rather too many Americanisms in the dialogue, and I wasn't quite convinced by either the hero or the neat ending.
But if you're looking for something new, and you like historical novels of the romantic but well researched type, then I'd certainly recommend this one. Especially if you've grown tired of authors like Alison Weir and Philippa Gregory, both - in my opinion - scraping away at the bottom of their respective barrels these days. Ella March Chase (who I'd never heard of before I came across this novel) has made an excellent job of what, in other hands, could have been a hackneyed and overblown tale.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars At the court of The Virgin Queen (or was she?), 22 Jan. 2012
By 
BusyReader "mrs28" (Midlands UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A thoroughly enjoyable novel which has intrigue , romance and mystery and historical elements.
Seen through the eyes of Elinor de Lacey the newest lady in waiting to Queen Elizabeth I the novel focuses around the tale that Elizabeth had a secret daughter whilst in the care of her stepmother Katherine Parr , and of what supposedly happened after the daughter was taken to be murdered to maintain Elizabeths innocence and chastity .
Elinor is brought up in a countryside estate - being spoiled and educated in politics and books by her father who always felt that a woman should have education, not just beauty and fine gowns.
After her father dies Elinor is offered a place in Elizabeths court and the book describes the life in Court: the clothes the food and feasts and visiting various houses, and the intrigue and life of a lady in waiting to a difficult woman who can one minute be debating in Greek and the next signing death warrants to ensure she rules with fear .
The likeness between Elinor and Elizabeth is striking as is their intellect and personality and it is not long before the truth comes out and suspicions are aroused.
The tale has excellent twists and turns and romance and thrills, with mentions made of genuine historical characters and events ends very well although not as expected, it kept me occupied and I found it a very enjoyable read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth a look!, 3 Jan. 2012
By 
Tinksjane "tink" (Cambridgeshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is a well written and intriguing book. Definitely a different take on a Tudor story than I had perhaps expected.....going along the "what if?" scenario......does make you think a bit and could that have happened?? I have to confess that it took me a bit to get into the story and my immediate reaction of no way that just would have happened attitude, then I tried to open my mind to it all and quite frankly did get lost in it all and thoroughly enjoyed the book. I would really recommend this to anyone who enjoys a historical read especially tudor times, but be prepared to take a different look at things!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly Engrossing Read, 10 Feb. 2012
By 
Amazon Customer "Angela" (Essex) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I have read many novels set in the Tudor period, but this for me (anyway) has probably been one of the best ones so far. You can feel the Author's love of the time period in her attention to detail in her story.

It is told through the eyes of the Young woman Nell De Lacey and starts in her present situation where she is locked in a cell in the tower of London and back traces the events that led to her current predicament.

She meets the young woman Elizabeth Tudor, when she herself is only five years old and it is a meeting that has future consequences and slowly unravels her relationship between herself and the now Queen in her present.

Nell comes to court as a young and sharp minded lady in waiting to the Queen, where she makes an impression on a handsome but jaded courtier, Sir Gabriel Wyatt, nicknamed the Gypsy's Angel. Many have warned her not to be taken in by him as he as a fearful reputation as a womaniser and someone to not cross swords with. Both Nell and Gabriel are fictional characters, and so are some of the others, but they are placed in the Tudor life as if they truly belonged there, interacting with such real life people like Mary Grey, Queen Elizabeth and Walsingham, but to name a few. Really enjoyed the book and intend to read more of her stuff.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprised myself by enjoying this more than I thought I would, 19 Dec. 2011
By 
JK "J. K." (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Have to be honest and say that I read very little historical/romantic fiction but; being crazy for most things Tudor I thought I'd give "The Virgin Queen's Daughter" a chance and, surprised myself by enjoying it more than expected. I like the concept of a "mysterious" child who may, or may not, be the birth child of the magnificent Queen Elizabeth 1 and the fact that there's another puzzle, a different mystery, running through the plot really kept the pages turning. Definitely not a "bodice ripper" and written in an intelligent style that might appear a little dry if you're after a really naughty "Tudor" romp but; the plot's strong and there's plenty of intrique to carry you along. I very much enjoyed the character of Nell de Lacey and found all of the Elizabeathan history running through the background highly believable. Not necessarily easy to read, there's a lot going on, but I finished the novel quickly, didn't find myself bored by it and would certainly read Ella March Chase's work again in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Keep reading and you will enjoy, 23 Dec. 2011
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This is almost a book of two parts. It is fictional but based around the Elizabethan court. A young maid arrives at court bearing a resemblance to Queen Elizabeth. This is the story of how she negotiates through the perils of court life. At first I found it dull and laborious to read with even known historical characters seeming uninteresting and dull. Suddenly however my interest was captured and I found I was desperate to turn the pages. The unpredictable Elizabeth, the dark and sinister Walsingham and the charming Dudley seemed to leap from the pages. Kat Ashley and Mary Gray were ever court presences. The fictional characters of Nell and Gabriel held me spellbound and the fate of them really caught my imagination. I loved them. Although fictional the book really seemed believable and is well worth a read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars An entertaining historical fiction novel, 4 Mar. 2012
By 
Helen S - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This novel, as you can guess from the title, is based on the idea that Elizabeth I, the Virgin Queen, may have had a daughter. Although there's no real evidence to support this claim, it was apparently rumoured that Elizabeth, as a young princess, had secretly given birth to an illegitimate child who might have been fathered by Thomas Seymour, her stepmother Katherine Parr's husband. Elizabeth was also linked throughout her life with Robert Dudley and so another theory is that he could have been the baby's father.

The Virgin Queen's Daughter is narrated by Elinor de Lacey (Nell), Elizabeth's newest lady-in-waiting, a young woman who shares Elizabeth's hair colour and love of books and learning. Nell was brought up in the countryside by John and Thomasin de Lacey, believing them to be her parents, but after her arrival at court she begins to make some discoveries about her past. Could Nell be Elizabeth's secret daughter?

If you've read lots of Tudor fiction I'm not sure The Virgin Queen's Daughter offers anything very new, but although I've read quite a few Tudor novels I'm not at the point where I'm bored with the period yet and so I really enjoyed this book. Although I find it hard to believe that someone in Elizabeth's position could have concealed the fact that she was pregnant and kept the birth of her child a secret, I still thought it was an interesting subject for a historical fiction novel.

Many of the famous names of the Tudor/Elizabethan period are here: as well as Elizabeth I herself, there's Robert Dudley, the "spymaster" Francis Walsingham, the mathematician and astrologer John Dee, Elizabeth's beloved governess Kat Ashley, and several of the Queen's ladies - Lettice Knollys, Isabella Markham and Mary Grey (sister of Lady Jane Grey). But the strongest characters in the book are the fictional ones: Nell de Lacey and one of the noblemen she meets at court, Sir Gabriel Wyatt. Nell is an interesting and intelligent narrator - like the Queen she enjoys reading and studying, things women were not usually encouraged to do at that time. And Gabriel was such a great character I was a bit disappointed that he didn't really exist!

I thought Ella March Chase did a good job of portraying the intrigue and danger of life at court, where you never knew who could and could not be trusted, and where anyone believed to be a threat to the Queen could find themselves locked in the Tower. And with two of the main characters being fictional, the author could take their story in some unexpected directions, which added plenty of tension and suspense to the novel.

The Virgin Queen's Daughter doesn't really stand out from other historical fiction novels of this type, but overall it was a fun and entertaining read which I would recommend to fans of Philippa Gregory, Alison Weir or Karen Harper.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Virgin Queen............................or not?, 21 Feb. 2012
By 
laineyf "widnes" (warwickshire) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
There have been rumours for centuries about Elizabeth I, the virgin Queen. Was she, or wasn't she? She had an unquenchable desire to be courted, which remained with her throughout her life. She has been linked to Thomas Seymour, the Lord High Admiral and husband to her stepmother, Catherine Parr, who was the sixth wife of Henry VIII. Of course, there is her love for Robert Dudley, who she created Earl of Leicester, and is probably he only man she would have married, had she been so inclined. There has been speculation that Elizabeth, when a young girl, gave birth to an illegitimate child, but whether this child was Seymours, or Dudleys, who can say? There is a story that a midwife was taken blindfolded in the middle of the night, to deliver a young woman of a child, and this young woman was believed to be Elizabeth Tudor. 'The Virgin Queens Daughter' by Ella March Chase tells the story of Elinor de Lacy, a young noblewoman whose life, and that of Elizabeth are entwined. Is Elinor the mysterious rumoured child of Elizabeth? What lengths will Elizabeth go to, in order to protect her crown? In a time when no one's head was safe, when rumour and scandal could bring down a kingdom, Elinor finds herself caught up in the constant intrigue at court, and learns to her cost that to defy the Queen demands a hefty price.
I really enjoyed this book, it is well written, well plotted, and takes the rumour of Elizabeths alleged illegitimate child and expounds upon it, making a very enjoyable, and plausible story. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting take...., 6 Feb. 2012
By 
Soo Broo (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Virgin Queen's Daughter (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
It took me a little while to get into this book, but once I did, I enjoyed it. This is another in the tranche of new books featuring a character more on the sidelines of the Tudor period and it is interesting to have stories woven from their point of view.

The detail, description and narrative were very good - it cracked along at a brisk pace and gave an authentic feel to the period. I particularly liked the viewpoint of a young girl desperate to get to court and then becoming disillusioned and unhappy; very much as I might have imagined it to have been in reality - the great glittering jewel of the court that appears perfect from a distance, but is in fact flawed once you're up close.

I wasn't TOO sure about the actual storyline, although the author did leave the question of any blood ties hanging - ultimately we'll never know what happened, if anything, between Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, but it did make an interesting plotline. Elizabeth was also portrayed quite (I imagine) realistically amongst other attributes as a vain, manipulative, fickle monarch which was a slightly different take.

My only two real criticisms were that the end of the story was a slight anti-climax. I won't spoil it, but I did think it might be slightly more dramatic. Perhaps that was the point though, that leniency won the day and blood is thicker than water. Hmmm.

My real bugbear however was that, as this is written by an American, it was totally spoilt at times by the use of the (non) word GOTTEN. Gotten? In Tudor England? Nuff said.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Virgin Queen's Daughter
The Virgin Queen's Daughter by Ella March Chase (Paperback - 19 Jan. 2012)
£7.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews