Customer Reviews


131 Reviews
5 star:
 (80)
4 star:
 (28)
3 star:
 (16)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really readable
If you like Caitlin Moran you'll enjoy this. Great if you missed any of her columns in The Times, or you want to be reminded of what clever writing looks like. If you've never read any of her work, do give this a go. An opinion on everyone and everything. Probably something I'll go back to and dip in and out of again.
Published 16 months ago by Ms E Somerset

versus
68 of 77 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One way to get behind The Times' paywall ...
First the good news. Caitlin Moran's journalism has for some time been largely hidden from view unless you buy The Times. Now here are many of her articles available to us all - really, a lot of them - it's a good-sized book. And if you like her writing, you'll like this. She is genuinely funny and seldom dull.

I bought How To Be a Woman, but I didn't buy this...
Published on 6 Nov 2012 by blacktaffeta


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

68 of 77 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars One way to get behind The Times' paywall ..., 6 Nov 2012
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
First the good news. Caitlin Moran's journalism has for some time been largely hidden from view unless you buy The Times. Now here are many of her articles available to us all - really, a lot of them - it's a good-sized book. And if you like her writing, you'll like this. She is genuinely funny and seldom dull.

I bought How To Be a Woman, but I didn't buy this. I borrowed it from the library. For two reasons.

1. She is, theoretically at least, passionately pro-libraries so I imagine she should be all in favour of that.
2. I read a quote from her that every time she sees someone with a copy of her book, she says "Kerching" under her breath. And that's not very nice, is it?

So this brings me to the bad news. Underneath all the brilliance and the determination to entertain, I sense something rather like contempt for her readership, who after all provide her with a huge income. When I saw her speak last year she was hung over. All those people had paid to see her and she couldn't stay sober the night before. There's also something uncomfortable for me about the way she writes about her children - about her attitude to her husband - about her massive self-belief (please don't write about world economics again, Caitlin. You have no understanding of economics. It makes you look stupid as well as arrogant and I'm sure you don't want that).

Also, the later articles are not as well-written as the earlier ones. Churning out all those words every week seems to be taking its toll and it's clear she's ready to move on from journalism.

Therefore, three stars. Read the book fast, revel in her facility with language, enjoy her interviews with the cream of the entertainment world. Just don't look too deep beneath the surface, because you might not like what you find.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


59 of 67 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This isn't a patch on "How to be a Woman". Buy it if you want a collection of her Times columns. Otherwise, don't., 19 Sep 2012
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
Oh, Ms Moran. I am sad and disappointed by this book. I had waited for it like a child waits for Christmas, and read it the first day it downloaded itself onto my Kindle.

If I hadn't read "How to be a Woman" this would have been a very, very funny book. But because it's a collection of articles, it is somehow...not very satisfying in book format. One can, at times, almost sense the desperation of the author, up against her deadline, typing away furiously in order to fill up that 600 word count with Sherlock fangirl love before the editor explodes. If this had been advertised properly as a selection of the Times columns, it would have been a very good book indeed. However, it was publicised as "all the stuff that didn't fit into "How to be a Woman"". And it's not, really. There is a great deal of churnalism. We've heard about the going clubbing with Lady Gaga. We know your views on burqas and the test for sexism (is it polite? Are the men doing it?) We remember you talking about being horrifically late to interview the PM.

Don't misunderstand. This is not a bad book. I would be being very, very unfair indeed if I were to suggest that this isn't enjoyable. There are some lovely purple patches about Downton Abbey, the beauty of Wales and the disconcerting resemblance of David Cameron to a gammon (yup, that hits the nail on the head. Or the clove into the gammon). The elogy on Ghostbusters and the versatility of its one liners was classic Moran: "Back off, man - I'm a scientist" is the one I find myself using the most often; most recently when the logic in opening a bottle of warm rose at 3am was brought into question". The piece on libraries is one of the most beautiful things written in the English language, and made me cry, a little bit. Ditto the pieces on the Olympics, which are so very well observed: "Even if Sebastian [Coe] does completely balls it up, there's no getting away from the fact that, for a month, the Canadian Men's Swimming Team are going to be on the Central Line, a little bit lost and a whole lot buff, letting me stare at them for free. Bring the honey to the MILFs, IOC". That one had me laughing so hard on my morning commute that I think my Tube carriage wanted me sectioned - or better still, shot at point blank - at the next station. But there aren't enough of those moments to make a book. The purple patches fade to lilac as they're stretched out with column-filling tumbleweedy stuff about the hotness of Benedict Cumberbatch, and the attempt to weave in the "in bed with Pete" conversations doth not a structure make.

This suffers from second book syndrome, in my view. Her first adult book was so great, so glorious, that I have made a present of it to EVERYONE I know, man, woman and awkward teenage girl alike. (I haven't given "How to be a Woman" to teenage boys. They have to figure that stuff out first, else they'll be way too successful in life.) I can't do that with Moranthology. It was funny in places, sad in others, wry in many - but it didn't have that awesome newness of perspective and turns of phrase that you will end up quoting from memory even whilst wrecked in a bar on a Saturday night.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really readable, 22 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
If you like Caitlin Moran you'll enjoy this. Great if you missed any of her columns in The Times, or you want to be reminded of what clever writing looks like. If you've never read any of her work, do give this a go. An opinion on everyone and everything. Probably something I'll go back to and dip in and out of again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ok, drags up bits of "How to be a woman" far too much, 28 Dec 2013
By 
Pixie (Preston, Lancashire) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
Ok read. It drags up bits of "How to be a woman" far too much. I found this book quite slow. Not a patch on "how to be a woman"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ghostbusters!!, 26 Nov 2012
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
Reading through the reviews here on Amazon and elsewhere, it is clear that a few readers are a little disappointed about the fact that Moranthology is a collection of Caitlin Moran's Time's columns. I can possibly understand this - it isn't made clear, exactly. But you do have to ask yourself

a) What exactly is wrong with the idea (she's a great writer and great writers have been putting together anthologies for years and people seem to like them)? And...

b) ...if you read The Times regularly, surely it would have been difficult not to know what this book was about (they serialised it for a week!)

So, that's not a problem. And neither is the writing. The three weekly columns that Caitlin writes for the Times (Celebrity Watch, the TV review and Weekend magazine column) are invariably highlights of my weekly read. She is clever, funny and original. The punning is superb and the wit and rhythm is usually timed to perfection (sometimes it goes slightly wrong but even that's okay). Anybody who brought the world "the Gallery of Hotness" or "Shag Order" or who describes David Cameron as "a C3PO made of ham" is worth re-reading. There is a type of critic whose criticism is often more memorable and creative than the work he/she is critiquing - Caitlin Moran is right up there in that league (Ghostbusters!). When I heard this was effectively a `greatest hits' collection from the last few years, I didn't have to think twice about buying it. But then, there is a slight problem, a different one...

When you sit down to read this book, you will spot it quite quickly. It's not the message; it's the relentlessness of the message. Taken together, these columns are basically a very long polemic on very few subjects, subjects on which Caitlin holds a very passionate, irreducible opinion and brooks no dissent. You notice this less when it's just a couple of remarks or half a paragraph in a review of the latest episode of Doctor Who but when you staple half a dozen years worth of them together and try and read through the whole lot, it bites. Basically, this selection (perhaps it is just THIS particular selection?) serves to demonstrate that a Caitlin Moran column is effectively little different from a Daniel Finkelstein column. The politics are different and Caitlin is funnier, her words more original and more memorable but a refreshingly objective view of the world it just is not. And I doubt if I would get through a Daniel Finkelstein anthology

So there we are. I wanted and expected to give this five stars (I'd read all of it before, you see) but I can only give it three. How does that work? Well, I just added three for making me laugh and making me think and subtracted two for telling me exactly what to think...over and over again
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not a very good look, her opinions often don't match up, 25 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Paperback)
Not a very good look, her opinions often don't match up. She's a feminist so wants 50/50 work place quotas (that's not equality, that's just silly) but then in the next chapter she wants men to stand up for her on the tube and give her their seat. Make your mind up! Its just a way for her to show off how rich she is still working class innit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant read, 14 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
Great collection of Caitlin Moran's columns. Lovely to dip in and out of. Nice mix of thought provoking and light-hearted pieces.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 12 May 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
There isn't much to say other than Catlin Moran is razor sharp as usual and one of the only writers who is able to make me laugh out loud. Brilliantly clever and wonderful in every way. Woman crush.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoying all these, 29 April 2014
By 
Pam Vick "Pam Vick" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
Working my way through all the Moran books and loving them all. Have literally snorted coffee out of my nose laughing out loud at some of the stories in this volume.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marvellous, 28 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Moranthology (Kindle Edition)
I loved it, as good as I expected and laugh out loud funny. Hopefully there will be more to follow
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 214 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Moranthology
Moranthology by Caitlin Moran (Paperback - 2 May 2013)
£6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews