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280 of 295 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must-read for women under 30
...which I'm not, you understand. I've a decade on Caitin and grew up with the feminist debate raging about mine ears. For a while now I've been sighing heavily at how it seemed to have fallen off the cultural radar - no one seemed to be talking about it any more, let alone calling themselves a feminist. And now here's Ms Moran, putting the debate about what it means to...
Published on 14 Aug 2011 by Sarah Rayner

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468 of 511 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Started well...................
I'm giving this book 3 stars as an average based on the fact that at the beginning I thought I would be giving it 5 but by the end I wanted to give it just 1.

My girlfriend has been asking me to read this book for a while (for the record I am male but like to think I am as liberal as they come). Eventually I acquiesced and started reading with few expectations...
Published on 30 July 2011 by Al


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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not sure what all the fuss is about..., 7 Aug 2011
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This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
This book is not about how to be a woman, it's about how to be Caitlin Moran. She already knows that, and most of us don't care. Funny in places but I wouldn't really recommend it.
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48 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not my idea of feminism, 9 July 2012
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This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Kindle Edition)
I am so skint at the minute that I paying 3.70 for a book feels like quite a big deal, and I want to get my money's worth, but that is the only reason I've persevered with it as far as I have (I got to 80% and skim-read the rest).

I've given it 2 stars because I think maybe my expectations of this book were wrong, and maybe as what it is it's OK, just not my cup of tea (it is quite funny in places). I bought it because an article about feminism that I read cited it, and I was expecting a bit more of a discussion of feminism, rather than a light-hearted memoir. But it's basically a book about shoes, clothes, how to not look fat, and celebrities. And it's full of statements of the author's beliefs as facts, often without any justification.

Caitlin Moran can't walk in heels, so heels are anti-feminist.
Caitlin Moran flirts a lot so flirting is OK. And she likes pole-dancing so that's OK. But she doesn't like strip-clubs, so strippers are letting down women everywhere. But she does like Burlesque, so that's great.
Gossip mags are awful because they're always slagging off female celebrities, but they're not as awful as Katie Price, who has most of a chapter dedicated to how awful she is.
Bikini waxes are anti-feminist, small pants are awful, but everyone should have beautiful uncomfortable bras.

I feel like I've just read 10 issues of Cosmopolitan back-to-back, but without any pictures.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You gotta laugh, 9 April 2012
By 
Mrs. H. Fitzgerald (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
If this book is an important book about feminism then that's great, because it is really, really funny. Let's face it, it's not a topic known for it's moments of hilarity. It's fantastic to have someone as cool and funny as Caitlin Moran championing the cause. However I'm not convinced that this is an 'important' book. As many other reviewers have pointed out it just isn't very well argued. I'm not convinced Burlesque is that different to stripping, or Gaga to Madonna or that CM argues effectively that they are. She doesn't tackle the central issue of 'Having It All' - a phrase I hate, but a concept I'm all too familiar with. CM's chapter on women in the workplace is far too simplistic and the men ridiculous 70s caracatures straight out of 'Terry and June'. Nothing about juggling, flexible working etc which are key, in my opinion, to women taking over the world(!) Also she never mentions Margaret Thatcher, going straight from Emmeline Pankhurst to Madonna. I don't think this is massively significant it's just interesting as both CM and I were brought up in Thatcher's Britain. Overall though I really enjoyed the book and would recommend it, just wouldn't attach too much importance to it.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor Stuff, 13 Jun 2012
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
How To Be a Woman, the Abridged Version:

If I, Caitlin Moran, enjoy it, then it's all good flirty fun.

If I, Caitlin Moran, don't enjoy it, then it's disgusting and sexist. I mean how DARE they! How UTTERLY DARE they! etc etc

My advice: Stick to her stuff about celebrities in The Times, which is funny and doesn't pretend it has something meaningful to say.
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29 of 34 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nah, 4 July 2011
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
Really enjoy Caitlin Moran's columns. Her memoir? Not so much. Thing is, it IS a memoir - if it was called How To Be Caitlin Moran, I'd probably be less surprised by the pages and pages of chat about her eating cheese in Wolverhampton or bantering with colleagues in the office. There's also a strong whiff of name-dropping in the book - lest we forget she is a very successful and well-connected columnist for The Times (which might explain the glowing press reviews she's received from, presumably, her mates at other newspapers). If you enjoy Caitlin's writing, you'd be better of taking out a subscription to Times online than buying her book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but made me want to rant., 20 Nov 2012
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This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
The bits about Caitlin Moran's unusual childhood and family are brilliant (family on benefits, 7 siblings, home schooled). If she writes a straightforward autobiography I'll buy it in a heartbeat. In this book though the autobiographical bits are mixed in with some feminist discussions. It's a bit like listening to a friend rant in the pub - you agree with some of it, you disagree with some of it, and generally you're interested in what they have to say. The problem is, you can't join in with the book. There's no opportunity to tell your drunk friend in the pub that they're talking rubbish. It's very frustrating and leads to you ranting at the book. If you enjoy that, this is the book for you.

The other thing that bugged me was that although she's clearly a very successful woman, she writes most of the book with an air of 'I'm rubbish, I just muddle through', which is infuriating. Hard to believe she read her way through a library or two but didn't at any point learn, for example, how to act in a workplace, dress appropriately, or prepare for giving birth. It seemed incongruous in a feminist book, which you really don't expect to be endorsing a 'silly me, I'm so ditzy' attitude in women.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yes! but..., 31 Aug 2012
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
A wonderful, frank book, which I enjoyed immensely. However, I strongly disagree with one of the points.

Sorry, I'll quote from memory, because there was a small queue to read How to be a woman at Bury (Greater Manchester) libraries, and I had to return the book rather suddenly. The part I am talking about says something along the lines, that men despise women not because of a "eunuch complex" or any similar artificial highbrow concept but because women are losers.

I agree with this but you elaborate saying, approximately, that in 50 years since the beginning of mass-production of the pill and changes in the law, which declared gender equality in workplace for a tiny minority of Western women, they did not produce anybody equal to Einstein and Steven Hawking.

I cannot argue about Einstein, after all, there are probably only four or five people, which radically changed how we picture the physical world - Plato, Aristotle, Newton with the first person who proposed the idea of the atom being the fifth. Hawkins, on the other hand, "only" made a relatively major contribution to the current cosmology theory and is mostly known as a celebrity.

There are scores and scores of scientists of his caliber. Surely Marie Skłodowska-Curie, who discovered radioactivity, which has had much wider implications than Hawking's inflation theory, is more than on par with Hawkins, who did not win a Nobel Prize yet? She won not one, but two, the first shared with her husband and another man, but the second one with no one. Incidentally, her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie also won a Nobel Prize.

There is a difference between true worth of a person and his or her media coverage, and the media prefer eminent men and beautiful women, and rarely other way around. I think if we carefully examine the other examples of non-surpassed winning men, we'll discover a few equally talented women.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some bits great, others haphazard, 18 Mar 2012
By 
Mrs. J. E. Gray "Jennifer Gray" (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
I began this book with great expectations, and it was fun at the start to read along with someone who has had a quirky, original and fun life. It got drearier though as the book went on, and felt rushed...perhaps it was.

I enjoyed reading her feminist arguments, and as a role model for modern feminism I think she represents a fresh perspective, although I found some of them to be more like rants rather than considered views, which is fine, but for that it gets more of an average mark from me as I don't see it as life changing. It is akin to reading a large comment section in a newspaper.

If you are a budding feminist, then this is a good place to start, and therefore I would recommend this (and apologies for the mass generalisation) to under 25's as the references to parties, celebrity lifestyle e.t.c are likely to be current, but if you want a book that gives a more balanced and deeper analysis of feminism, go elsewhere.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars On being Caitlin Moran, 24 Oct 2011
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
Moran's chatty and slightly frenetic style of writing make this book the ideal companion for a long journey, and it is full of ballsy and noteworthy stories. However, do not be misled by the title into thinking that this is a definitive guide to what it is like to be a modern woman. Rather, it is (as a number of other reviewers have noted) a book on how to be Caitlin Moran; in essence an autobiography with some observations about life. I liked the book but felt that Moran's narrow experience of the world as a music journalist - her key figures of influence seem to be modern musicians, and with limited reading of feminist literature - do not make her a reliable guide. But, still a fun read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 7 Aug 2011
This review is from: How To Be a Woman (Paperback)
First of all I was really impressed with the low price- especially seeing as the book is relatively new. I bought it having seen Caitlin Moran on TV and thinking it sounded like an interesting book. It was! It manages to be very amusing (laugh out loud in fact, be wary of reading it on public transport), emotional (the chapter on abortion is particularly moving) and actually quite sensible and informative. I like the way it's divided into sections, making it good to keep as a sort of "life guide" when you need a it of motivation about something specific. I finished it feeling enlightened and slightly liberated, and I'd recommend it to any woman (or man, in fact, if they don't get squeamish about certain biological processes) with a good sense of humour.
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How To Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (Paperback - 1 Mar 2012)
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