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87 of 105 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A guide to self experimentation
The early advice in the book is to not read the whole book, just pick out the chapters that interest you. This is what I usually do, but I read the 4 hour body all the way through in one weekend. It is fascinating, it is informative and I learned a lot. Yes there is a recipe of what you should do to reduce fat and train better (and in much less time). But what I take away...
Published on 31 Jan. 2011 by Dost

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138 of 146 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "Be a student, not a follower" - Jim Rohn
This book unfortunately was a big disappointment for me. I absolutely loved the 4HWW but this book seems to be a hangover from his first book. "How to make money from selling information" and it seems that this book is the product of that philosophy.

Almost everything taught in 4HWW was used to promote this book including the use of competitions to sell more...
Published on 26 April 2011 by Kho


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138 of 146 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars "Be a student, not a follower" - Jim Rohn, 26 April 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
This book unfortunately was a big disappointment for me. I absolutely loved the 4HWW but this book seems to be a hangover from his first book. "How to make money from selling information" and it seems that this book is the product of that philosophy.

Almost everything taught in 4HWW was used to promote this book including the use of competitions to sell more books during launch to get the book to the top spot in book sales. Asking this fans and followers to write reviews all to create more "credibility indicators" along with "real life examples". All of this has made me question the credibility/validity of this book.

In essence it's not a book thats getting good ratings for the merit of its content. So keep that in mind when making your decision about whether or not to purchase this book.

So onto the book itself. Having read all over the subject of personal health and nutrition I was hoping that this book would provide something new and remarkable in developing a system to improve results of sorts. However, this book seemed to be a bit of a hack job. Bits and pieces put together to create a beast of a book.

I especially enjoyed the titles: "How to lose 9kg in a month". Anybody who is significantly overweight that goes on a healthy diet would lose that kind of weight easily including myself. And it seems that many people who have seen these results have assigned its merit to the 4HB. Once again resulting in more ratings.

"Six Minute Abs: Two ab exercises that actually work" - A variation of the classic abdominal crunch and sucking your belly in, oh and get your body fat percentage below 12%.

"From geek to freak: How to gain 15.4kg in a month" - Supplements and exercises that promote Sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy. Will it it make your muscles big? Yes, through making them bloated. Again, disappointed there was no mention of muscle hyperplasia (creating new muscle fibre). Again the book seems to be targeted towards quick superficial results. And I use 'quick' as a relative term. (PS - I like the way how they left out the word "lean muscle" from the title of this section.)

Will this books help people lose weight? Sure, and the somewhat misguided publicity will convince more people to follow its principles. Are the theories sound/safe? Some of them are - in an over-hyped and half-truthful way, and the rest are questionable at best.

My advice is to try the book as an experiment and then take what works with you. Some of the theories may turn out to be effective and just what you're after, others not so much. My only wish was that Ferris had used his clout to promote proper health and nutrition and not mass radical experimentation.

Losing weight and getting lean is a slow process as well a long-term study/education. Take any of these shortcuts with due diligence. And if you're already a health freak following a healthy routine and seeing results, get this book for fun and keep it on your bookshelf but don't expect to learn anything new - its introductory level at best.
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101 of 111 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The best ever guide - to hacking your body and and self marketing, 5 Mar. 2011
By 
S. Walker - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
Ferris throws together a wide ranging and somewhat disparate ensemble of topics and offers some interesting insights into them all. Unfortunately he does so with incredible hypocracy. Scoffing at poor science he proceeds to offer anecdotal evidence for many of his claims and adopts a inconsistent approach to referencing.

Each chapter is a small essay on a different topic, and each jumps between narrative, product endorsement, unreferenced fact, and often, some very insightful ideas and jumping-off points on the subject.

As an introduction to the numerous topics, this book represents a great starting point for further research, and goes further than that in many places. More importantly, Ferris recognises the importance of what some teachers call "cues". Not necessarily focusing on telling you the facts, but rather what you need to hear to get results. In my opinion he frequently hits on very effective techniques that work.

Perhaps my biggest issues with the book are that firstly the chapters are hard to follow as serious advice darting as they do between ideas, and secondly often it reads more like the hype and marketing bumf he purports throughout to eschew. It's often less a "how to improve yourself" than a "how to make a lot of money from selling a book to suckers".

I'd give this book more stars for its smattering of insightful gems if only I hadn't been made to feel like a sucker!
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285 of 320 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Promises Far More Than It Delivers, 30 Oct. 2011
By 
Theo (Gondwana) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
The first thing the author of this book tells us is that we're not meant to just pick it up and read it all the way through. Instead, we're encouraged to read the introduction to establish a certain base level of knowledge, and from there decide for ourselves which of the remaining sections are relevant to us.

The book has specific sections on losing fat, gaining muscle, improving sex, perfecting sleep, reversing injuries, running, getting stronger, living longer, plus a section called "from swimming to swinging", which covers a grab-bag of topics. Personally I focused on fat loss, so that's what I'm going to focus on in this review.

The section on fat loss begins with a chapter entitled "The Slow-Carb Diet I: How to Lose 20 pounds in 30 Days Without Exercising". Pretty spectacular stuff, huh? In fact, most authorities agree that weight loss that rapid is not healthy. So before I began I decided that if the program truly lived up to its hype, I'd only stick to it for a couple of weeks before going back to a slower weight loss program. Unfortunately - or fortunately, depending how you look at it - overly rapid weight loss never became a problem.

The diet is broken down into five rules:

1. Avoid "white" carbohydrates (e.g. sugar, white rice, white bread, potatoes).
2. Eat the same few meals over and over again.
3. Don't drink calories.
4. Don't eat fruit.
5. Take one day off per week and go nuts.

The author also advises dieters to emphasize high protein foods, legumes, and vegetables.

I took two serious shots at this diet. In the first I made one small change of my own, but in the second I followed the stated program TO THE LETTER. In neither attempt did the results even remotely live up to the claims made by the author.

In my first attempt, on my non-binge days I ate:

Breakfast: 2 cans of Old El Passo "Mexe-Beans" plus raw baby spinach.

Lunch: Kangaroo keema with optional green salad; OR steak with grilled tomato and optional steamed broccoli.

Dinner: 20 gm of 85% cocoa dark chocolate plus 20 gm of sunflower seeds plus optional green vegetables (raw baby cucumbers or celery, or steamed broccoli). The chocolate, which I ate for its established heart-health benefits, was my only break with the diet's normal rules. It represented less than one single teaspoon of sugar per day, and as a low glycemic index (GI) food, at least seemed in the spirit of "slow carb".

I drank only water, diet sodas, and black, unsweetened coffee. Following a further suggestion of the author's, I also drank two litres (4.2 pints) of chilled water per day. I occasionally skipped a meal, but as stressed in the book, always ate my high protein breakfast within an hour of waking up.

In the week before going on the diet I have to admit I overindulged. As a result my weight "spiked" by 3.4 kg (7.5 pounds). After five days on the diet literally all of this had come off. Unfortunately, that's where the good news ends. In the three weeks after that I lost just 1.3 kilograms (2.9 pounds). So on a diet billed as causing weight loss of 20 pounds in 30 days, I actually lost less than 3 pounds in 3 weeks. At this point I decided it wasn't worth continuing.

My body fat percentage did end up marginally higher than it was when I started, but the difference was well within my normal daily fluctuations. I did not go quite so far as to use the more rigorous body fat measuring protocols suggested in the book, but I did use my scale (with electronic body fat monitor) at the same time each day: immediately upon awakening, after using the bathroom but before eating or drinking anything.

On the plus side, if you not unreasonably take the view that Mr. Ferriss is not responsible for what I did to myself in the week before going on his diet, you could say that I lost 10.4 pounds. On the other hand, if you factor in the reality that - as any experienced dieter knows - weight gained during these "final" binges usually comes off very quickly anyway, what we're left with is a loss of less than one pound per week. As a personal aside, when I ran the weight loss program by a nurse friend of mine she predicted that it wouldn't work: that each week I'd just regain what I'd lost in my weekly binge. This is one of those friends with an unfortunate tendency to be right. As it turns out, each week I regained almost, but not quite all that I had lost. Hence the very slow net weight loss I did in fact achieve.

And that's where my discussion of the slow carb diet originally ended. However, after posting this review I began seeing claims that my daily dose of dark chocolate was why the diet didn't work for me. I decided to do some reading, and found an article in the Journal of Nutrition reporting that coco-flavoured foods really do cause an insulin response greater than you'd expect from their GI alone. Dark chocolate is still very good for you in the long run, but it _might_ cause an insulin spike at the time you actually eat it. And it is true that the book tells us to avoid this. I figured it was just possible that the fault here really was my own, so I decided to give the slow carb diet another try.

The second time around, on the days I didn't "go nuts" I ate nothing outside the following four meals:

Old El Paso Mexe-Beans served on leafy greens with a splash of red wine vinegar and jalapeños.

Kangaroo and cauliflower curry served on leafy greens with a splash of red wine vinegar.

Lean rump steak with steamed Brussels sprouts.

Stir fried vegetables (from local Chinese takeaways; on most occasions ordered in curry sauce).

The second time around I omitted the 2 litres of chilled water per day.

On almost every day of the diet I ate three meals: one beans, one meat, one stir-fried vegetables. I once missed the third meal, and I once had a second meal of Mexe-Beans in place of the vegetables, but that's it. As before, I was always careful to eat a high protein breakfast within an hour of getting up, and drank only water, diet sodas, and black, unsweetened coffee. This time around I also made the supreme sacrifice and omitted the pre-diet binge so beloved of slimmers everywhere. I wanted to be sure that whatever weight I lost was going to be real weight loss. No excuses!

My results were mediocre to say the least. After six days of regimented eating I'd lost 1.1 kg (2.4 pounds). In the "go nuts" day that followed I not only regained all of this weight, but more besides. As a result, by the end of the next six days of regimented eating I was still actually 0.1 kg (3.5 ounces) HEAVIER than I'd been at the end of the first six days - although still 1 kg (2.2 pounds) lighter than when I first began. On a positive note, in this second shot at the diet my body fat percentage did drop slightly, so all of that appears to be real fat loss. Even so, it seemed pretty clear that I was simply yo-yoing, just as my nurse friend had said I would. Plus I'd only lost about a quarter of what I should have by day 14 had I truly been on course to "lose 20 pounds in 30 days". I decided it was time to call it quits and resume a healthier pattern of eating.

So much for my personal experiments in fat loss. There are two other sections of the book I would now like to comment on.

First, "Adding Muscle". Ferriss is an advocate of Arthur Jones style High Intensity Training, or "HIT". As with his weight loss program, Ferriss has no problem advertising truly spectacular results, titling one chapter "From Geek to Freak: How to Gain 34 pounds in 28 days". I agree HIT deserves more attention than it gets, but there are more realistic manuals out there. Just do a book search here on Amazon on "High Intensity Training" or "Mike Mentzer" and you'll get some good suggestions.

Similarly, while Mr. Ferriss has a chapter entitled "Living Forever: Vaccines, Bleeding, and Other Fun", a lot of the science behind this chapter on "Living Forever" is highly debatable. Here too I would advise that there are simply better, and certainly more scientifically grounded books available. I personally suggest starting with Dr. Roy Walford's Beyond the 120 Year Diet and the CR society website. On a more conservative front, Jack LaLane's Live Young Forever is also well worth a look.

Finally, I would like to comment on the number of five star reviews this book has garnered, particularly over on Amazon's US website. Having seen other reviewers claim that this book gained a suspiciously high number of positive reviews rather too quickly, I decided to do a little detective work. By sorting the reviews from oldest first, I easily verified that 110 reviews of this book were posted on the 14th of December 2010. Of these 110 reviews, all but 5 gave the book five stars. Obviously it's equally easy for you to verify all this too - provided you don't mind doing some counting! A disturbingly large number of five star reviews also happened to appear on the US website on April 26 2011. I've no idea why April 26 2011 was the magic day, but if you do happen to know, then please leave a comment on this review letting me in on the secret. I'm quite curious myself!

Incidentally, having read many of the other reviews, I can't help but notice that even among the 5 star raves, when an actual rate of weight loss is reported, it is generally about half of what is claimed in the book - and often considerably less. Why these people are willing to give a book five stars under such circumstances is a question you'd have to ask them.

In the end I can only say that I went into this with an open mind. I did actually buy the book. If you track down this review as it appears on Amazon's US website (which is where I bought it from), you'll see that it does have the Amazon Verified Purchase label. I didn't throw away that money just so I could write a nasty review. I also took not just one but two very serious shots at the weight loss program contained in the book. And yes, like anyone else on a weight loss program, of course I wanted it to work. However, I find that I cannot reconcile my own experiences with the countless rave reviews this book seems to attract.

Draw what conclusions you will.

Theo.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars mish mash, 9 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
As others have said, this book is more like the authors 'encyclopedia' of all things he's tried in all things body. Not to be read necessarily end to end, and not everything works for everyone - at least it didn't for me. Some of the tips (like immersing yourself in cold water) may trigger fat / weight loss in a scientific and measurable way, but it's not something I necessarily want to do to myself and I'm not even sure it's safe to follow either. Same goes for the counter-intuitive diet he's proposing which doesn't sound healthy in the long term - eat proteins every day except one day / week where you can go wild and it absolutely anything in any quantity you want.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Run of the mill with a few pearls of wisdom, 10 Oct. 2013
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
The 4-Hour body is somewhere between a distinctly average book and an excellent book.

As with so many self help books there is a lot of information in this novel that is not only covered by other similar books but probably covered by all of them. I am talking about things like the low carb diet, the promotion of drinking high amounts of water and the admonition to not rely on the scales to measure success on a diet and exercise regime. This information, whilst useful, is nothing new and so it lowers the overall effectiveness of this book.

The other information, information that is either new or that I simply haven't come across in this book is split into two categories:

1: Really useful and possibly life changing
2: Very subjective and possibly a waste of time

The things that I have taken away from this book that fall into the first category of original/unusual information is very limited. I have made a small list of things to add into my own life routine or to research more of and there are less than 10 points on that list which is a bit disappointing. However, after sampling a lot of self help books that number is higher than most.

The rest of the information then falls into that category which I class as highly subjective and very dubious. In spite of his constant reminders that he isn't a doctor and what he is reporting is purely based on statistics, there was a lot of what could only be called medical advice (information on supplements and way to live that fly directly in the face of what doctors advise) and very little statistical information. The studies he mentioned were barely elaborated on and most of the information in this book was based on his own experience rather than scientific studies.

I am not sure where the "4-hour" part comes into it at all. Whether that is a relation to how long it took to read the book (it doesn't take half that long to read) or some other routines that I somehow overlooked I have finished this book none the wiser as to where it fits in.

All of this aside this is a book is still worth reading. It is a quick read that as with most self help books is at least inspirational and motivational. If nothing else it will reaffirm what you already know and give you one or two things to mull over at the end of reading it.
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87 of 105 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A guide to self experimentation, 31 Jan. 2011
By 
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
The early advice in the book is to not read the whole book, just pick out the chapters that interest you. This is what I usually do, but I read the 4 hour body all the way through in one weekend. It is fascinating, it is informative and I learned a lot. Yes there is a recipe of what you should do to reduce fat and train better (and in much less time). But what I take away is the self experimentation I can do too and have fun with it. I am inspired by Tim who is quite clearly an exceptional individual. His passion and knowledge oozes out of this book.
In particular if you want children, men should read about Tim's insight in this area and the female orgasm chapter is very.... DETAILED.... with diagrams on how to and even what to say and all. That should suit a lot of men!

One thing that is seriously annoying is, that the editors deemed it necessary to translate all the kg weights into stone & pounds for the British release of the book. This was done by somebody who has no concept of British measures and therefore they are often wrong. Nobody would use 0.12st for a kilo or at one stage they claim 14 kg = 7 stone. They also translated every $ amount into £ as well. WHY? It really is annoying and distracting when reading the book, please leave it out in the reprint.
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36 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A revelation, 15 Aug. 2011
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
I bought this book on recommendation from a friend who had experimented with a few chapters from the book with great results. The book is a collection of experiments and research that the author has completed over the past ten years on the human body. Much of it challanges regular thinking and explores doing things easier or smarter. The key difference with this book is it's not a back to front read, instead it is more a 'pick a chapter and have a go'. Some chapters will appeal, others may not.

I particularly liked the Chapter on slow carb dieting, this is really working for me right now and isn't much of a challange. The Kettlebell swings section is also really cool and there are also a couple of other fun chapters on Sleep and sex which are fun.

The overall vibe of the book is to have a go and see what works for you, the book doesn't take itself too seriously but it is based on science, research and a better understanding of how the body works without boring you to tears. So if you are looking to make some tweaks and changes to your lifestyle to get fitter and healthier but you aren't quite ready to overhaul your way of life for a six pack then this is for you. You'll see results quickly in any area you decide to pick up on and you won't have to wade through 400 pages of theory before you get there. 30 minutes and you'll be taking content away and using it.

Losing fat
Gaining muscle
Improving sex
Improving quality of sleep
getting a six pack
Controlling body using temperature

... and more. Like i say not every chapter will float your boat but they are all independent and don't form part of an overall regime.

Fun, digestible, manageable, readable, informative and just plain better than every other book I've read on the body.

It's all about results and getting them fast.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You get out what you put in, 25 April 2012
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
Tim Ferris is best known as the author of the The 4-Hour Workweek The 4 Hour Body Book Review (Pros & Cons), which is a minimalist approach to "escaping the 9-5, live anywhere, and enjoy the new rich". It's a fantastic book that I would rank in my Top 10 most influential books I've read, maybe even Top 5.

So with that said, how does the The 4-Hour Body The 4 Hour Body Book Review (Pros & Cons) hold up? Did Tim translate his impressive research, analytical, and outside the box thinking to crack the code of transforming the human body?

First off, this is not an easy book to review because the 4 Hour Body is not a book, but more like 3, or 4 books in one. In the introductory chapter, Tim lays out "5 Rules" on how to read the book, the first of which warns the reader to, "Think of the book as a Buffet".

The 4-Hour Body is like a reference on all things related to the extreme of body change and performance that should not be read all in one shot. Including the Appendix, this is a monster 590 page book that is very dense at times even for the most eager reader.

Here's a quick snapshot of the sections of the book, which range from 10 pages to 80 pages:

* Subtracting Fat
* Adding Muscle
* Improving Sex
* Perfecting Sleep
* Reversing Injuries
* Running Faster & Farther
* Getting Stronger
* From Swimming to Swinging
* On Longer & Better Life

Now with all that said, I'm going to go into the pros and cons of the book so you can determine if it's worth your time and money to purchase and read it. I'm going to pay particular attention to the Fat Loss and Muscle Building sections, which comprise about 40% of the book.

Pros

Leverages the knowledge of experts - It is undeniable that The 4 Hour Body is a very impressive tome that represents thousands of hours of research and experimentation that only Tim could pull off. The depth and breadth of the book in my opinion is astounding. The reason why much of the information is so deep is because Tim was able to access the top fitness researchers and experts in the world on a whim. Many of these experts provide detail that could only be based on years and years of experience and devotion. For example, Tim discusses advanced muscle building strategies with Dave Palumbo who is a smart and accomplished 300 pound bodybuilder who literally interviews and coaches bodybuilders all day long. It's very valuable for the everyday consumer to be given access to these experts where it would be exorbitantly expensive, or simply infeasible any other way.

Tons of interesting tidbits - Would you like to know how you can sleep for only 2 hours per day and function normally? What about how to assess your functional movement? Or how you can increase your vertical leap a couple inches in 5 minutes? There are tons of small tips and tricks littered throughout the book that are interesting and thought provoking. At the end of every chapter is a "Tools and Tricks" section which gives links to more information and relevant products. It may be worth buying the book just to use it as a reference, which is what I ultimately think Tim really wants.

Covers a vast array of fitness topics in detail - Most fitness books do not address the entire scope of health and fitness, from power, to strength, to speed, to endurance, to injury prevention. The breadth of information as it's presented gives the reader a more complete view of the human body and any facet that can help improve it. At times the breadth of the book feels overwhelming, but again, it's meant to be a reference material.

Cons

There is no cohesive strategy to lose fat, increase strength, and improve overall health & well-being - If you are looking for a sustainable plan to help you lose fat and improve your health, The 4 Hour Body will be a disappointment. The problem is that whether it's building muscle, increasing strength, running long distances, or losing fat, or improving longevity, many of the eating and training approaches contradict each other, which can be very confusing. What you are left with is an amalgamation of eating plans and training programs that attempt to isolate and maximize a specific training effect, or outcome. This is not very helpful for the average person who wants to lose some weight and improve their health sustainably.

Much of the advice is nearly impossible to implement - I must admit at times (or most of the time) I exhibit some OCD behavior, but Tim takes it to a level that is even beyond my imagination. I was chuckling in disbelief at several recommendation the book offered. A large chunk of the advice is so impractical and pedantic it would make a hard core bodybuilder who weighs food all day long cringe. For example, here's a quick excerpt about the advanced fat loss strategy that involves cold water immersion:

"I placed two 10lb bags of ice in a cold water bath and submerged myself for a total of 20 minutes. Those 20 minutes were phased as follows:

00.00-10.00 minutes - Up to mid-waist, legs submerged, torso and arms not submerged.

10.00-15:00 minutes - Submerged up to neck with hands out of water (sitting cross legged then reclining makes this easier in a standard bathtub).

15:00 - 20:00 minutes - Submerged up to neck, hands underwater."

I can assure you this excerpt is just the tip of the iceberg and gives you a flavor for how the book is written. Finally regarding the fat loss section, the main advice is to follow the "slow carb" diet, which is another way of saying an extremely difficult to follow low carb diet that allows only fibrous vegetables and legumes as carbohydrate sources.

Largely based on self-experimentation - In addition to expert input, the book is based on Tim's obsessive self experimentation, which ranges from drawing blood with needles 6 times per day to measure his blood glucose levels, to eating beef and nuts all day long to help boost testosterone. While Tim is able to come up with some interesting and exciting conclusions based on his own research, it's difficult, if not blatantly wrong to assume what works for Tim will work for me, or you. One thing that has become clearly evident to me as I've been running a personal training and nutrition counseling practice is that two people can respond completely differently to the same approach. For example, Tim discusses how eating any fruit whatsoever halted his fat loss goals (such as drinking orange juice in the morning), when I've personally never come across that issue before, nor have any of my coaching/private clients.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read but not a practical guide for 90% of people, 30 Dec. 2011
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
The book takes extreme scenarios such as lose body fat rapidly, build loads of muscle really fast, eat whatever you want and not get fat, extend your life (yes, extend your life - but don't get too excited), hold your breath for a really long time, build a killer 6-pack... and loads of other things that we all want to achieve in super fast time with as little effort as possible.

It's actually a really interesting read and I've given it three stars because the majority of you will be fascinated by the authors claims and methods alone. Everything he claims possible he has tested on himself first and then written the book around it. However, as with all books like this, what we really want is a magic formula - a simple 'drink a glass of this once a day and it will all take care of its self solution' but you soon realise (as with everything)... it's just not that simple. In fact some of the methods are so extreme that I actually got bored reading 'how to do it' let alone actually try doing it.

I'm sure all of his claims are true, however, the amount of effort, calculations, science and overall work (and in some cases cost and hunting around) involved in order to achieve all that is contained within, instantly excludes 90% of people. However if you are in the 10% then you will love this book and I'm sure achieve all of the results.

If nothing else, it's an interesting read and worth having on the bookshelf just in case at some point in the future you might want to blow the dust off and lose some weight rapidly before going on holiday, because you've promised yourself you would three months previous but just lacked REAL determination and will power (which is actually the secret to everything) to actually stick to a diet and now need a quick fix.

However, if like the majority of people that go from one self help book to the next and are still looking for 'the secret to everything' then I'd save your money and get it from the library instead - you'll still enjoy the read!
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3.0 out of 5 stars I'm in two minds about this book, 2 Dec. 2013
This review is from: The 4-Hour Body: An uncommon guide to rapid fat-loss, incredible sex and becoming superhuman (Paperback)
I read his first book The 4-Hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich and enjoyed it massively.

I read this book and also enjoyed it and was greatly enthused to give the workout techniques a go. I also changed my diet following the guidelines that Ferrriss recommends too (although I didn't do any of the supplements that he suggests as I didn't feel comfortable taking lots of powders and pills based purely on his advice).

Unfortunately, I didn't see any massive improvements to my fitness or body shape. I would describe myself as being above-average in terms of fitness so perhaps the book works better for those who are below-average in terms of fitness.

As a result, I enjoyed reading the book (and treating it almost as a work of fiction or an entertaining tale of someone's experiments on his own life) but I didn't find it worked for me. So 4 or 5 stars for enjoyment factor, but only 2 stars in terms of benefits to me.
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