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5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful and uplifting
The soft green and pink cover-design prepared me for an engaging light read. Like Lucy, I practise yoga, and have sought the mystic Indians and swoony swamis she described in her previous volume, "Yoga School Dropout". But Lucy's autobiographical account touched me on a far deeper level than I had anticipated.
Lucy spent many years as an advertising executive in...
Published on 28 Mar. 2012 by S. Robinson

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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
I bought this after reading the author's previous book, Yoga School Drop-Out. I didn't feel it was anywhere near as good. This may seem a bit unfair but if I'm honest, I was bored reading the book. On more than one occasion, I was tempted to stop reading and not bother to finish it. At first I just thought perhaps the author was being a bit self-indulgent with details...
Published on 2 Oct. 2009 by viaroute42


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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 2 Oct. 2009
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This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
I bought this after reading the author's previous book, Yoga School Drop-Out. I didn't feel it was anywhere near as good. This may seem a bit unfair but if I'm honest, I was bored reading the book. On more than one occasion, I was tempted to stop reading and not bother to finish it. At first I just thought perhaps the author was being a bit self-indulgent with details that were of no consequence and definitely of no interest (perhaps stuff you would write in your diary?) However, I did continue to the end, in the hope that it would get better, but was just left with an empty feeling that time could have been better spend on another book. I don't think it was particularly well written (sorry, Lucy). It's just my opinion; what do I know?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not much yoga!, 22 Jan. 2011
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
The title of this book is misleading. it should read "middle-aged, middle-class and desperate with a bit of yoga thrown in" I bought this on the strength of Yoga School Dropout, but this book really disappoints. Disjointed narrative, a lot about conception in middle age, and some of it not accurate, too, in short, a fairly boring autobiographic snippet. There isn;t much happening in the countryside, and the author doesn't have the creativity or wit to turn a rather boring story into anything engaging.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A not-pregnant pause, 17 Mar. 2010
By 
S.M. Gidley (Sidmouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
Like a lot of readers I came to this book having read and enjoyed Yoga School Dropout. In her first book I felt that Edge had brought a refreshing voice and perspective to an area that often suffers from middle-class wishy-washiness as well as often hardcore, marginalising sanctimony. For these reasons, I was intrigued to find out what she did next so was keen to get my hands on her second book.

Whilst I didn't dislike The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club, I kept finding myself wondering what the point of it is. She meets a man, decides to have a baby, moves to the country, finds out she can't have a baby, finds some new mates and then gets married. So? Whereas Yoga School Dropout has a strict focus and a clear voice, this book seems to be a little bit all over the place. I wasn't interested in her two sets of girlfriends and their stilted reported conversations which never, ever work in these kinds of books and end up reading like try-hard strangulated Sex and the Cityisms.

What was interesting and what she did write about well was infertility and the irresponsible reporting that leads many women to think that they'll be able to get pregnant in their 40s. Edge should have written more about this and done some more exploratory work around it (something of which she is quite capable given her background in advertising and market research). She makes good, realistic points about this issue in a clear-headed way that would be well worth bringing to a wider audience. This is an issue that will only increase as women who chose to focus on a career now realise that all those stories of women having IVF at 45 were doing so with donor eggs and not their own. And all those women will welcome something sensible to read rather than a lot of false hope and mad science.

I myself do not want children but her realisation of the rapid decline in fertility from 35 onwards was actually quite a shock to me and I felt angry on her behalf that her and many other women will be left with a non-choice that may adversely affect them for years to come.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 17 Nov. 2009
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L. Cleary - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
I really enjoyed Yoga School Drop-out, and I thoguht this would be as good. Actually I thoguht it was a bit self-indulgent, and parts of it were rather boring. There were some good bits, but this is nowhere near as good as Yoga School Drop-out.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A mockery of Yoga, 4 April 2011
By 
S. Muench - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
I don't know what's going on but there's a veritable flood of books out at the moment which are doing their best to merge yoga and spirituality with chick-lit. Or rather, I do know what's going on. Of course I do. It's all about money, isn't it? Take one hip chick who has dabbled a bit in Yoga to get a better body, and even gone to India on a spiritual romp through India's ashrams; what better next step than to turn it all into cash by writing what one hopes will be a best-seller? Liz Gilbert did it, Lucy Edge did it, and now Lucy Edge tries to exploit her little bit of Yoga knowledge a little bit more but writing a sequel. I might sound snarky but I think someone needs to raise a hand in protest.

I've been visiting a very reputable but little known Indian ashram for the last 40 years. I know several Westerners who go there regularly; these are my friends. It would never occur to any one of us to write a book about our experiences there; but I bet you, if we did, those books would have a little more gravitas than these silly little romps publishers are putting out. A spiritual path is a very precious, very intimate process. One does not exploit it to make a fast buck. To do so is to reveal yourself as very shallow indeed; and this is exactly how Lucy writes about her Yoga: as just another fashion accessory.

For a start; some of the information in these books are just wrong; but what can you expect from people who spend two days to two weeks or even two months in an ashram? For instance, Lucy Edge says that Yoga comes to us through Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism. This is nonsense. Yoga is firmly embedded in the Hindu tradition, and even though there may be forms of it in Buddhism and Jainism, it was never the integral part of those religions as it is of Hinduism.

Then she does on to quote the "Indian Guru Osho" as saying "it was an accident that the Hindus discovered Yoga". What kind of a stupid quote is that? For a start: it's well known that Osho was not a guru. Osho ran a manipulative cult whose members have proven to have been engaged in an orgy of criminal acts including the mass poisoning of a whole town, attempted murder of sannyas cult members, wire tapping, gun and drug running; and who is known for encouraging promiscuous sex among his disciples; and whom even Lucy Edge, in her first book, admits is a fraud. Secondly: how on earth can a science as multi-layered and intricate as Yoga be "discovered by accident"? Is she just trying to be quirky?

The only part of this book that is good is the story of her attempts to get pregnant. She should have concentrated on that issue: it is certainly worth writing about that women should think again about having babies later in life when it is just too late. If she had left off the "oh we're so cool because we get drunk after our Yoga" act and written a mature book about the risks of leaving motherhood until it's too late she might have produced something worth reading. As it is, she makes a complete mockery of Yoga and leaves the real theme of the book till last. Not good.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful and uplifting, 28 Mar. 2012
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This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
The soft green and pink cover-design prepared me for an engaging light read. Like Lucy, I practise yoga, and have sought the mystic Indians and swoony swamis she described in her previous volume, "Yoga School Dropout". But Lucy's autobiographical account touched me on a far deeper level than I had anticipated.
Lucy spent many years as an advertising executive in London. Marriage and babies could wait - long-term. Then, in her early 40's, she followed her inner yearnings and headed to rural Norfolk with her new man. She wanted to become "fully secure in herself" for the first time in her life.
I spent a similar number of years as a single woman living and working in London. Then, at Lucy's age, I too moved out to the countryside to become what she would describe as "an earth mother".
But Lucy longed for children. And this, ultimately, after an agonizing hunt through fertility options, was to be denied her. Some parts of her story, where she accepts that this is one dream that is not going to come true for her, moved me to tears.
In sharing her experiences, Lucy not only made me laugh, in recognition and empathy; but also she inspired me. At her wedding, she thanked her father because "he taught me the importance of holding out for what I wanted - even if it took me more than forty years to find it."
Lucy's accounts of female friendship (her après yoga sessions over the Pinot Grigio with `the Cappuccino Gurus' - her London yoga friends - and `the Bad Ladies' of Norfolk) are a joy - and in part reminded me of "The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood" by Rebecca Wells.
As she advises her yoga teacher friend Kate: " `I suggest you do a Four Corners Collage - each corner represents an aspect of your life - relationship, home, family, work. I did one the year before I met David... and guess what,' I said triumphantly, `I got everything I wanted'. I stared into my glass of Rioja. `Well, almost everything....'"
Lucy's honesty and gentle humour make her story one to love.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An inspiring read, 16 Feb. 2011
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This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
Lucy Edge writes honestly, bravely and wittily about herself and her real- life experiences. Her first novel, Yoga School Dropout,was also great but felt more niche due to how yoga oriented it is. This book however should be a must read for women everywhere whose career is their priority. For as Lucy makes it very clear, one's fertility isn't concerned about waiting for you to 'make it'. Times have changed but our eggs haven't! An inspiring, heartbreaking but equally uplifting read.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life beyond the yoga mat..., 5 Aug. 2010
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
The Handbag and Wellies Yoga club continues Lucy's adventures from her last book Yoga School Dropout. It's a heart warming story about embracing a slower pace of life in Norfolk, making new friends, being in love and her struggle to have a baby. What I love about Lucy's writing is her openness, honesty and humour.

From an epiphany doing a headstand to enlightenment after a glass or two of Pinot Grigio with the Bad Ladies, this book draws you in as you share in the ups and downs of Lucy's life. She proves that no matter what intentions we set and how many chants we sing or pretzel-like poses we master, the outcomes of our lives are often not in our control.

I thoroughly enjoyed both of Lucy's books and this one in particular as it shows life beyond the mat but for a yoga fan like myself, there's also a good dollop of cosmic mergers, chakra openings and Sanskrit chanting to keep you smiling all the way to the end.
The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More than just a story about yoga, 19 Sept. 2009
This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
Lucy's latest book is more than just a continuation of her adventures as a yoga student. This book covers some of the things that life throws up in front of you - from the joy of meeting her partner to the pain of realising they can't have a family together. You follow Lucy's journey not just in her move from London, finding new yoga classes and friends along the way, but also follow how she deals with the news of not becoming a mother.

Anyone looking for a book on yoga practice or philosophy should look elsewhere but as an example of how yoga fits into our lives and the difference it makes, this is a great read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 7 Aug. 2009
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This review is from: The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club (Paperback)
In recording her life experiences, the author confides the consequences of her high-pressure work in advertising and her subsequent disillusionment. She describes how she left in search of a more "grounded" base and found it in a return to a life bounded by closeness, simplicity and good-will. Her new life confirms her as an honest woman with guts and tenacity coupled with a huge sense of humour and sense of the ridiculous.

This is not a "marshmallow" book, but her disappointments don't cling to her as a tragedy, they give her insights with she she resonates. The book is a page-turner and reveals the author as the kind of wise friend we would all like to know and enjoy.
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The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club
The Handbag and Wellies Yoga Club by Lucy Edge (Paperback - 6 Aug. 2009)
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