Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (8)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "It all went Pete Tong.....BIG STYLE!"
Only being 21 i missed the 90's dance scene by about 5 years but the 80's and 90's acid house scene has always intressed me, this book is a great insight into the madness,parties,and how the scene went from illegal raves to a global clubbbing brands.

If you where a clubber in the late 80's and through the 90's this book will be a great read, all the clubs all...
Published on 13 Mar 2009 by J. E. Norman

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Glaring gaps and contradictions...
Firstly, I thought the book was a great read. Dom Philips style was ambitious and engaging.. skilfully beat mixing history with updated interviews with the main protagonists. My heart was pounding with excitement as I turned each page, the curtain was pulled back and I learned more about the inner working of 90s clubland.

There are however many major...
Published on 26 Jun 2011 by M. R. Montgomery


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "It all went Pete Tong.....BIG STYLE!", 13 Mar 2009
By 
J. E. Norman "normanuk02" (northamptonshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
Only being 21 i missed the 90's dance scene by about 5 years but the 80's and 90's acid house scene has always intressed me, this book is a great insight into the madness,parties,and how the scene went from illegal raves to a global clubbbing brands.

If you where a clubber in the late 80's and through the 90's this book will be a great read, all the clubs all the DJ's get a shout. For clubbers that came into the scene in the 2000's like me some of the people and places will be a little bit lost on you but its still great to read about.

The book is heavyly based around the DJ "Sasha", i no he is a great dj and pretty much was the first dj to gain "superstar" status but it does get a little bit annoying after a while how often his name comes up. I think maybe the only way sasha would agree to an interview for the book is if he had a chapter about "himself"

The book also has a annoying habit of starting a story in say 1999 and then the next paragraph goes back to 1994 can get a little confusing.

this is a great book and deffo worth a read. 4/5
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Glaring gaps and contradictions..., 26 Jun 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
Firstly, I thought the book was a great read. Dom Philips style was ambitious and engaging.. skilfully beat mixing history with updated interviews with the main protagonists. My heart was pounding with excitement as I turned each page, the curtain was pulled back and I learned more about the inner working of 90s clubland.

There are however many major gaps...

1. Apart from 2 passing references to Northern Ireland it is completely omitted from the book. This is odd especially as Sasha (who features large in the book)has such loyalty to the place. Also clubs like SugarSweet run by David Holmes (of Ocean's 11-13 fame etc.) and McCready, changed the lives and fabric of Belfast society arguably contributing to the current peace process. Orbital wrote a famous track after one legendary nights attendance.

2. There is no index??? I thought only cheap pulpy true crime books from the USA couldn't be bothered adding an index. A book that clearly covers so much history needs an index. Especially for people with memory problems!

3. It is certainly impossible to include every noteworthy DJ but certain DJs contributed to advancing certain elements - standing on the shoulders of giants and all that. Brandon Block would be one example in terms of how he helped built the now multimillion pound Ibiza scene.

The book certainly ends on a sour not which in my humble opinion was a bad comedown.

Dom appears to have a Freudian esk relationship with Sasha building him up excessively only to tear him down at the end (he did the same with Cook but in a more factual way).

Sasha is a genre all to himself - if you want to know if that genre is alive and well go and see him over the summer. Indeed if the book gets a second publishing the current trend section needs updated to included how people like Tong are still world class and that dance has only truly come of age in america with Hip Hop stars falling over themselves to work with Morillo and the like.

All in all despite the above critique a must read for anyone who wants to know more about what they don't remember from the 90s.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best dance/electronic music book I've read!, 29 April 2009
By 
Stephen Brown (Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
For anybody who has been clubbing at any point over the last 20 yrs, this is a must read.

Dom Phillips unravels the crazy story's and urban myths that followed the phenomenon that was 'Superstar DJ's', thanks to his previous role as editor of the worlds most famous dance music magazine, Mixmag. He speaks candidly to all the big movers such as Sasha, Carl Cox, Norman Cook. As well as all the promoters of the superclubs such as Cream, Home, and Gatecrasher about the ridiculous money that was made and the drugs that were on tap.

This obviously makes very entertaining reading, but what the book also explores is the politic situation in the UK through the late 80's / early 90's and how the criminal justice act was adjusted to ban repetitive music!

Although I am quite knowledgeable of house / acid house music's roots I found the opening chapters of the book explained this very well, and put an interesting slant on things.

Finally, there is some excellent nuggets of well-known celebrity gossip throw in for good measure, which might explain why some BBC breakfast show presenters were so 'perky' in the mornings!

10 / 10 for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Cobbled together bunch of old mixmag stories, 28 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
This is a slightly boring review of 1990's club culture. I went along with the read as I grew up in the nineties and am still a big fan of house music to this day and I will be for life! I don't understand the point of the book. I had respect for Dom Phillips as he wrote some good sleeve notes on global underground mixes and I believe he named the genre 'progressive house' - I loved progressive house and the global underground series. The problem I found was that at the end of the book he slates Sasha for no apparent reason and I felt a bit ill when I read it.This left me with 3 options... 1) resell the book on Amazon, 2) give the book to a charity shop, 3) squirt hp sauce over it and lob it in the bin! I chose option 3!! My advice is to have a look elsewhere as there must be a better club culture books knocking around. (And also Sasha is still an ace DJ/music producer).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A cracking read, 14 Jun 2009
By 
Michael Smyth (Brazil) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
This book was going to have to be very good to deliver what it promised. And it did. Charts the rise of dance music and its DJs against backdrop of social and cultural changes of the 80s and 90s. Some great stories in there...and brought back a load of memories.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun read but disappointing, 13 April 2009
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
This is an enjoyable book to read and helped fill many gaps in my history of key figures in UK club culture. Unfortunately tho it suffers from some pretty shabby writing and a somewhat negative view of it all...which is odd given the author made a living from talking up so many of the people involved. Dom Phillip's album sleeve to Paul Oakenfold's Global Underground 007 CD is stuff of legend, this book doesn't match it. Dance music and all that went with it changed the face of our society significantly for the better and it's something to be celebrated, not lamented.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Superstar Office DJ, 19 July 2012
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
I work with several great office DJ's who all rate their own skills highly. This book makes an excellent gift for the superstar office DJ in your life.

This is the site of my favourite office DJ, Russ. [...] He will love this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An eye-opening and always interesting read about an important period of Britain's counter-culture, 9 Feb 2012
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
I embraced the 90's dance music scene with gusto. Obviously I didn't realise at the time just how significant a decade the 90's would turn out to be. In 1993, I was a 16 year old boy, having left the strict discipline of a private boys schools for a lenient state college and, in turn, discovering and doing lots of things that would likely make my parents ill if they ever knew.

I couldn't always be bothered with the dressy aspect of the superclubs so I generally stuck to the more alternative techno/electronica club nights. The straightforward house music of the superclubs never particularly inspired me but I had another group of friends who frequented Wobble, Fun and Miss Moneypenny's in Birmingham so, on occasion, I would slip on the tartan trousers, the white shirt, the tank top and shiny shoes and join them.

As the 90's drew to a close, however, my interest in clubbing waned, along with all the things that went with it. A full time job, my now-wife and the diminishing quality of the merchandise meant I slowly but surely turned my back on clubbing, with me giving it up as an almost weekly activity in 1999. I've been raving since then, but never again did it consume my life like it had previously.

Reading this book has made realise I got out at just the right time. If I'd have been a year or two younger then I could have also been one of those poor sods who forked out £100 or more for a ticket on Millennium Eve, only to be massively let down. The Millennium signalled the end of an era for British clubbing. It was dance music's equivalent to Altamont and the Manson Murders, which some say signalled the end of the 60's, the hippy ideals, peace and free love. Both of these events were far more serious than a bunch of ravers being ripped off obviously, but a lot of punters lost faith after the Millennium debacle and so the bubble burst and things would never be the same.

I never really appreciated the colossal business it had become and the inevitable compliments to this - ruthlessness, back-stabbing and narcissism - were prevalent. Greed was the obvious stimulus, but cocaine has a lot to answer for. As soon as it swamped the dance floor, the smiles lessened, along with the fun. As time went on, the happy-go-lucky clubbers, some of which who'd turned their hand to promotion, were in the minority and the materialistic, shallow @rseholes who thought far too much of themselves were taking over.

Clubbing will always be part of British culture. But it will never be nearly as important as it was during the 90's. Like it says in the book (not word for word) - dance music is no longer the tsunami it once was, more just a ripple, like any other genre of music.

On the whole, this was an always entertaining read and at times a fascinating one. There are also some funny anecdotes, some candid, warts and all interviews with some key players and buckets of nostalgia from the golden era of the UK dance music scene.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superstar DJs, 1 Nov 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
Great book, lots of interesting stuff. Definitely recommended for anyone who went clubbing in the early nineties onwards, read mixmag, and is interested in a recap.

Reading this book reminded me of the exact issue of Mixmag where I realised it was going wrong - "DJs go fishing". Dave Seaman, Nick Warren and (probably) Sasha/Digweed. They went fishing and mixmag did a feature. Oh dear.

How glad I am, that I was going to free parties instead of these superclubs.

Highly recommended book though.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Social history, 22 April 2009
By 
T. A. Lay "bookworm" (uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ (Paperback)
A great bit of social history from Dom Phillips that documents the dance music movement. Forget Britpop, the UK exported club culture to the world during the 90's and the vibrations rumble on today. Phillips holds up a mirror to the excesses of the Superstar DJs who, after all, were just blokes who spun records, and really should never have been allowed to collect six figure sums for doing so. This book sits snugly beside Matthew Collings' Altered States and Sheryl Garrett's Adventures in Wonderland as a detailed reference manual of just what went on during the era of dance. Very enjoyable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Superstar DJs Here We Go!: The Rise and Fall of the Superstar DJ
£11.19
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews