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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating memoir
I have always had a real soft spot for Madhur Jaffrey, so I bought this book as soon as it came out, despite the fact that I don't usually buy hardback books.

This is a beautiful memoir of Madhur Jaffrey's childhood in India. I think it is fair to say that she had a rather priveleged life. You only have to look at the descriptions of the house she lived in and...
Published on 13 April 2010 by Jennifer Malsingh

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars should have been more engaging than it was
I suppose because Madhur Jaffrey is so engaging in her cookery shows I had high expectations of the same form her book. Unfortunately, with so many tales of childhood and challenges of growing up in developing countries, this one pales into insignificance compared to those written by people whose primary role is writing. It was interesting but nothing too out of...
Published on 26 July 2010 by J. Southern


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating memoir, 13 April 2010
By 
Jennifer Malsingh (Bristol, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have always had a real soft spot for Madhur Jaffrey, so I bought this book as soon as it came out, despite the fact that I don't usually buy hardback books.

This is a beautiful memoir of Madhur Jaffrey's childhood in India. I think it is fair to say that she had a rather priveleged life. You only have to look at the descriptions of the house she lived in and her family's various outings and events to see that she was not exactly poorly off. However, she still manages to fit in a little bit of angst and unhappiness, though it's never really explicitly said what the root of it was. I suppose living in a large extended family must certainly produce some feelings of wanting to find your own place in the world, and I think this is what MJ was trying to get at.

As you might expect from any book by Jaffrey, there are plenty of mentions of food in this book, plus a few recipes. It's become a bit of a cliche for Indian writers to include recipes in their books, but it fits well in this one. It's also good to know that the recipes are by an accomplished chef, and are therefore likely to be very good!

If you have any interest in Madhur Jaffrey, then this book is a must. It is very enjoyable to read, and you can cook from it too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Write more please Madhur, 15 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India (Paperback)
Madhur Jaffrey is a woman of many talents - a talented actress much loved by Merchant and Ivory, the woman perhaps most responsible for bringing Indian cookery to the masses and if this book is anything to go by, also an excellent writer. The moment I finished reading her account of growing up in a large, well-to-do family, I was straight off to Amazon to see if she'd written about her adult life. Surely if her childhood is this interesting, how great would a book about her days of acting and cooking be? Sadly her venture into the world of autobiography seems to have stopped almost as soon as it started and I very much lament that this covers only her childhood.

"I was born in my grandparents' sprawling house by the Yamuna River in Delhi. Grandmother welcomed me into this world by writing `Om' , which means `I am' in Sanskrit, on my tongue with a finger dipped in honey"

Hers is not the poor peasant life - far from it. Her grandfather the barrister had their large house built on a plot in South Delhi and housed his eight children and all their offspring (though admittedly not all at the same time). This is a book about being part of a quite affluent family during a time of change and upheaval during the final years of British rule. She also tells us about the impact of the Partition of India on her life, noting the disappearance of her muslim school friends, off to find new lives in the new Pakistan. It's all rather sedate and dainty but there's no harm in that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sght smells and sounds, 30 Jun. 2013
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i loved the way the description of the food and family made you feel as though you were experiencing it with her.
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5.0 out of 5 stars charming memoir, 2 Feb. 2015
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charming memoir of a childhood in a Delhi that has now all but vanished
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars should have been more engaging than it was, 26 July 2010
By 
J. Southern (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India (Paperback)
I suppose because Madhur Jaffrey is so engaging in her cookery shows I had high expectations of the same form her book. Unfortunately, with so many tales of childhood and challenges of growing up in developing countries, this one pales into insignificance compared to those written by people whose primary role is writing. It was interesting but nothing too out of theordinary - if you want a great book about India then see Will Randall Indian Summer!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 8 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India (Paperback)
A present for a relative, so I can't comment.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars smelly, 31 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India (Paperback)
The content of the book is excellent as I expected. The book was later arriving than estimated, about 5 days late. The book was stained but this does not affected reading. But it has quite a strong musty smell which does affect enjoyment.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars God food, 25 Sept. 2011
It's a very god book and the food tht you can make from it is even better and it not expenpcive and it arrived here quikly...
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Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India
Climbing the Mango Trees: A Memoir of a Childhood in India by Madhur Jaffrey (Paperback - 1 Jun. 2006)
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