Customer Reviews


26 Reviews
5 star:
 (19)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A look at the real Captain Birds Eye
I first heard about this book on BBC Radio 4's 'Start The Week' where Andrew Marr described it as one of the few recent books that had left him feeling furious. Marr was spot on. This book sets out clearly the full ruthless horror that is industrial fishing and the irreversible damage it has been inflicting on the world's seas. How many of us know anything of modern...
Published on 2 Aug 2004

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad
I agree with the message of this book,and it did provide a lot of relevant facts regarding the state of the oceans today. However I agree with other reviewers that the writing style (particularly at the beginning of the book before the author is in 'the swing of it') is a little rambling and repetitive. I don't want to be told 46 times that cod stocks in the North sea are...
Published 6 months ago by Kitty


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A look at the real Captain Birds Eye, 2 Aug 2004
By A Customer
I first heard about this book on BBC Radio 4's 'Start The Week' where Andrew Marr described it as one of the few recent books that had left him feeling furious. Marr was spot on. This book sets out clearly the full ruthless horror that is industrial fishing and the irreversible damage it has been inflicting on the world's seas. How many of us know anything of modern fishing and still think of fishermen as quaint and harmless Captain Birds Eye? The seas and their increasingly desperate situation have gone largely unnoticed compared to land based farming and the state of our countryside. Hopefully this book will be a marine version of 'Silent Spring' and help bring about some form of solution. But as the book shows, solving this situation will be no easy task when faced with the comic nightmare that is the political, bureaucratic, commercial and scientific system trying to manage the seas and fishing. The book ends with a helpful guide to choosing which fish are okay to eat and those fish for which the situation is increasingly bleak and should therefore be avoided at all costs. The book is very accessible and written by the Daily Telegraph's environment editor. A must for anybody concerned with the state of our world's environment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read with caution!, 10 Mar 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
Working for a fisheries enforcement agency, I found myself agreeing with most of what Mr Clover has written and would heartedly recommend it to those with an interest in the marine environment. Sadly, the narrative does wander and looses focus near the end. There are a few errors that pedants could pick up (claiming that Greenland Halibut is also known as Turbot for example) but there were two big points I disagreed with the author on. Firstly, he is very negative on the use of Satellite Monitoring in Fisheries Control, which has really become an effective tool over the last few years - sadly, UK courts will often disregard this and the views of expert witnesses. Secondly, he touts the use of Blue Whiting as a replacement for Cod. With ICES now calling for a ban on Blue Whiting fishing to the ludicrously high weights of fish caught (Norway alone have an individual quota of 1 million tons which is the total quota ICES have recommended!) This is another fishery we could well leave alone.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, moving book! Incredible eye-opener!, 7 May 2005
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
The title does not look firstly as tantalizing as what all these pages really contain. You should really take a look inside and you will very probably realize how good this book is.
The End Of Line is definitely one of the best non-fiction books I have bought in the last couple of years. Here you can read what is really happening in the oceans worldwide. People often do not care much for what they don't see, but the consequences of what they (we) are letting happen to the fish resources are terrible.
Mr. Clover explains in a very professional and passionate way the crimes (the word is not an exageration) commited by such countries as Spain and the rest of the European Union, by Japan and many others, in their pursuit of profit: depleting the fish resources of many poor countries, bribing and coercing the government of those countries to let them do what they want with the fish, hiding reports to the public opinion. What the EU is doing about controls is really a bad joke.
We consumers need to wake up. Yes, eating fish is good for your health. Now, if no radical change takes place in the way we are destroying the oceans' biological resources, we are going to be in real trouble in the future and the next generations more so.
This all sounds pretty dramatic and it really is.
Thanks, Mr. Clover
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book made me cry, 5 Feb 2009
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
After reading all the terrible waste and destruction so eloquently put I got to chapter 14 and actually wept proper full on man tears - what other non fiction book, especially one about fish would do that?

Amazing, an essential read for everyone on this planet.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written and informative, 27 Jun 2010
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
I thought that Clover really got his teeth into the topic of the crisis of our fisheries. The book is packed full of hard hitting facts that are eloquently presented by a thoughtful writer.
I have to admit a certain bias that I work in fisheries management myself, and so already had a standing interest in the subject. However, even though the book is aimed at the general public I found plenty inside to keep me interested, despite the fact that I disagree strongly with his commendations that the European Union needs to privatise the sea if they are to be properly managed.

This aside I thought it was an excellent work of non-fiction. If you want to know more about the disastrous plight of wild marine life then look no further.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A convincing read, 8 Jun 2010
By 
V. Formosa-hamilton "Veronica" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
I purchased this book last year and found it to be an excellent read. As a wannabe vegetarian who still eats seafood I found this book very good in helping me to identify those seafood products I should avoid from a sustainability perspective.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scarier than Stephen King. Changed my life, 11 May 2010
By 
B. Stark - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
... well at least my shopping habits. Every politician should read this. Hats off to an author who has managed to make a book on fishing exciting and illuminating rather than preachy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 25 July 2009
By 
vh1967 (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I cannot fault this book. I was a captive audience having already sympathised with the subject area, and I was not disappointed. It is well researched and not emotive. The author skill fully 'trawls' (pardon the pun) through the data without a fluffy bunny brigade mentality, and gives suggestions for how we can put the wrongs right. I came away feeling more knowledgeable whilst being more disillusioned about the future of fish. It made me think more about what fish I buy; I will be buying less fish like salmon which may be farmed but is fed with fish from the sea (read the book for more about this) and I will be looking on packs of fish for MSC status before giving sellers my money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "The End of the Line" - an enlightening must-read, 14 Oct 2005
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
This book is a revelation. There is so much here that I did not know.
Every chapter is full of interest and examples of day-to-day fishing malpractices that illustrate so well the environmental madness that dominates this industry and the self-interest of those who form fishing policy. We are left in no doubt that the EU is one of the worst offenders. Did you know that it is estimated that about half the cod and haddock landed in the UK falls outside the fishing quotas, i.e. is stolen from you and me?
Charles Clover also puts forward well-argued case for allocating fishing rights for areas of ocean to escape from the "Tragedy of the Commons".
If you have an environmental conscience, you should read this book - and you'll probably adjust your fish buying habits. (See Andrew Marr's review quotes on the cover)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How Free Market Economics Leads To Famine!, 15 April 2005
This review is from: The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat (Paperback)
Clover does the research and makes an eloquent appeal to limit the rape of the world's oceans - trawling fleets cause destruction on a scale that beggars belief and with an effect that would be immediately banned if the techniques were used on land.
Mankind has a last opportunity to prove that he is not so stupid that he will destroy his own chance of a future - reading Clover's account of how EU bureaucrats and government "scientists" and politicians go about ensuring that we have sustainable stocks of fish does not give me any grounds for optimism. Clover has done a splendid job in appealing for common sense and action, but I fear that his warning will not be heeded.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The End Of The Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat
7.37
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews