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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should Be Retitled: How To Win Raises and Promotions
I had a hard time rating this book. I gave it a 5 for its dedication to Leigh Knowles, deceased chairman of Beaulieu Vineyards, a truly terrific guy and talented CEO. I gave it a 1 for having a misleading title. The book has little to do with becoming CEO. I gave it a 4 for generally useful advice about workplace do's and don'ts. I gave it an 7 for self promotion. I...
Published on 28 May 2004 by Donald Mitchell

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What you need to do to succeed
This book is written as a short guide to achieving CEO level with very short and to the point advice. I expected this book to be a longer in content than it actually is. However if you are a budding executive you will find some useful, rules for success in the competitive, octane fuelled world of business. It's filled with advice and a short description of such things...
Published on 3 Jan 2001 by tigertattoo777


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should Be Retitled: How To Win Raises and Promotions, 28 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: How To Become CEO: The Rules for Rising to the Top of Any Organisation (Hardcover)
I had a hard time rating this book. I gave it a 5 for its dedication to Leigh Knowles, deceased chairman of Beaulieu Vineyards, a truly terrific guy and talented CEO. I gave it a 1 for having a misleading title. The book has little to do with becoming CEO. I gave it a 4 for generally useful advice about workplace do's and don'ts. I gave it an 7 for self promotion. I rounded that to a 4. Decide for yourself what rating to give this book.
I write an article for Chief Executive Magazine each year about the best practices of the most successful CEOs. As part of this work, I have met and interviewed hundreds of the most envied corporate leaders. The subject of how each became CEO and what the lessons are usually comes up. Based on their experiences, you would write a substantially different list than Mr. Fox has provided. Key elements would include learning to do important tasks that the company needs done that no one else is doing; having a great relationship with shareholders and the board of directors; having massive integrity that is frequently demonstrated to others; making and keeping your promises; and establishing an environment in which other people perform very effectively. There's a lot more. If you are interested in more, read my article in the May 1999 issue on The Helpful Habits of the CEO... -- click on the leadership file folder to find the article).
The second problem with this book is that Mr. Fox acknowledges that most CEOs in companies get their jobs by either starting or buying the company. He then goes on to provide no direct advice on how to do either one.
The third problem with the book is that it provides general advice rather than specific advice about you and your own organization. Many of the rules he describes will vary from company to company. In front of many of his pieces of advice should be a first step: Ask the successful people in your company what the right thing to do is. In front of many of his comments about working with others should be a first step of asking the people involved what they would like you to do. The book assumes a communications stalled approach that can lead to backfires in many cases. For example, many people would prefer that you give them immediate verbal feedback along with a pat on the back when they do a good job. They would not be as pleased with a hand-written note, as this book recommends.
The final problem with this book is that it really covers the same subject as How To Be A Star At Work. That is a terrific book, and well worth reading.
If you do decide to read this book, pay the most attention to the advice to set written goals, score yourself on them, and pay attention to the goals. Research has shown that only one percent of people do this, and they usually outperform the 99 percent who do not.
Good luck in your learning of how to become a CEO!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What you need to do to succeed, 3 Jan 2001
This review is from: How To Become CEO: The Rules for Rising to the Top of Any Organisation (Hardcover)
This book is written as a short guide to achieving CEO level with very short and to the point advice. I expected this book to be a longer in content than it actually is. However if you are a budding executive you will find some useful, rules for success in the competitive, octane fuelled world of business. It's filled with advice and a short description of such things as: think for one hour every day, never write a nasty memo, don't get buddy-buddy with your superiors, always take holidays, look sharp and be sharp and make allies of your peers' subordinates. Once you've read this then try the 'Psycology of Achievement' audio series by Brian Tracy. That should really get you moving on towards success.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should Be Retitled: "How To Win Raises and Promotions", 28 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Should Be Retitled: How To Win Raises and Promotions May 7, 2000
I had a hard time rating this book. I gave it a 5 for its dedication to Leigh Knowles, deceased chairman of Beaulieu Vineyards, a truly terrific guy and CEO. I gave it a 1 for having a misleading title. The book has little to do with becoming CEO. I gave it a 4 for generally useful advice about workplace do's and don'ts. I gave it an 7 for marketing. I rounded that to a 4. Decide for yourself what rating to give this book.
I write an article for Chief Executive Magazine each year about the best practices of the most successful CEOs. As part of this work, I have met and interviewed hundreds of the most envied corporate leaders. The subject of how each became CEO and what the lessons are usually comes up. Based on their experiences, you would write a substantially different list than Mr. Fox has provided. Key elements would include learning to do important tasks that the company needs done that no one else is doing; having a great relationship with shareholders and the board of directors; having massive integrity that is frequently demonstrated to others; making and keeping your promises; and establishing an environment in which other people perform very effectively. There's a lot more. If you are interested in more, read my article in the May 1999 issue on The Helpful Habits of the CEO... -- click on the leadership file folder to find the article).
The second problem with this book is that Mr. Fox acknowledges that most CEOs in companies get their jobs by either starting or buying the company. He then goes on to provide no direct advice on how to do either one.
The third problem with the book is that it provides general advice rather than specific advice about you and your own organization. Many of the rules he describes will vary from company to company. In front of many of his pieces of advice should be a first step: Ask the successful people in your company what the right thing to do is. In front of many of his comments about working with others should be a first step of asking the people involved what they would like you to do. The book assumes a communications stalled approach that can lead to backfires in many cases. For example, many people would prefer that you give them immediate verbal feedback along with a pat on the back when they do a good job. They would not be as pleased with a hand-written note, as this book recommends.
The final problem with this book is that it really covers the same subject as How To Be A Star At Work. That is a terrific book, and well worth reading.
If you do decide to read this book, pay the most attention to the advice to set written goals, score yourself on them, and pay attention to the goals. Research has shown that only one percent of people do this, and they usually outperform the 99 percent who do not.
Good luck in your learning of how to become a CEO!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quick, easy reading tips on how to get to the top!!, 13 Oct 1998
By A Customer
I found this book to be very good! It is quick and easy to read. I finished it on one plane trip. It is motivating and presents its ideas in 75 tips. I passed it along as a "must read" to peers in an executive roundtable group. Although all 75 tips are great, I had my own top six favorites including: 1. Do not get discouraged by the idea killers. 2. Never panic or lose your temper. 3. Always take a vacation. 4. Do something hard and lonely. 5. Think for 1 hour a day. 6. Arrive 45 minutes early and leave 15 minutes late. The author's validity in compiling this list added to my satisfaction of the book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars There are only 75 steps to (corporate) heaven!, 6 April 1999
By A Customer
A little gem of a book. Very easy to read and full of interesting ideas. Unfortunately a bit American-centric and I am not sure about the reading list. Also this is based on past research. With all the changes happening as a result of the internet, are all these 75 'solutions' future proofed? Anyway the thoughts that grabbed me include: In business, money is the scoreboard. The more you make, the better you are doing. Jobs that do not get and keep customers are redundant. Your responsibility is to acquire that experience needed at the top of your industry. There are no barriers between anyone in the company and the customer. To know your customer is to know your future. Do something few others are willing to do. Make one good ally in your company every month. To run the company, you must be invited in. Elephants grow larger on the hormones of panic and deception. Creativity without implementation is irresponsibility. Demonstrate your ability to grow by adding one big new thing to your life every year. Practice being presidential all the time. Overinvest in people. Cynicism about one's own company is the hallmark of a loser. Success in projects is anticlimactic. Homework preordains it. "Nothing gives one person so much advantage over another as to remain cool and unruffled under all circumstances." (Jefferson.) If you have ten seconds to make a decision, think for nine. Think for three hours, write for one. It does not matter who thought of the idea. What matters is who implemented it. Teach without preaching. Tight budgets promote creativity. Mistakes are milestones. They indicate action in new areas. Mistakes are the exhaust of active people. Your family must be an ally in your future plans. Goals beget goals. A spouse is either an important ally for a company or a virulent enemy. It is the manager that does more with less that is most needed by the company. Monthly reports are stupid. Idea killers help you work harder.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Some Good Trivial Advice in a Skinny Book, 9 Jun 1999
By A Customer
To become a CEO, I think you'll need more than what is in this book. There are some interesting tidbits here and there, but a CEO will not emerge once this book is read.
Has Mr. Fox ever traveled on business? Some of his advice (don't have a drink with coworkers, work instead in your hotel room, order room service, etc.) could be a slap in the face to the salespeople/customers/coworkers who are hosting your trip.
After reading this book, it would seem anyone could make up a few lists and publish a book about anything, and not really have to be a writer. There are some interesting parts of this small book, and I would still recommend reading it and reading it periodically again and again to get the most out of it, but wait for the paperback version.
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2.0 out of 5 stars You can do better, 11 April 1999
By A Customer
I bought this book in a rush to have something to read on the plane. I am CEO of my company so I think I might have some insight into what it takes.
While some of the points were right on (like doing work on a plane or not having a drink with the gang), some of the points were silly and wouldn't project well on a would-be CEO. For example, take any job that is handed down by the boss. Well maybe, but Fox says to take ANY job even of it's watering the plants. Perhaps a better rule should be to find someone to water the plants, not to actually water them yourself as Mr. Fox suggests.
All in all the book was too short and too expensive.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Advice worth weighing, in a refreshingly light style, 5 Nov 1998
By A Customer
Mr. Fox's 75 insights into career advancement are fascinating in that they each follow a logic trail that is indisputable, and yet lead to a conclusion that is usually provocatively counterintuitive. For example, while middle managers like me jump at the chance to sit next to the CEO on the plane, Mr. Fox warns against it, with a bulletproof argument. And based on Fox's advice not to socialize excessively with clients, I will never again feel guilty about going back to the hotel and watching a movie on SpectraVision. "How to Become CEO" is an easy read with some hard hitting advice. A great Christmas Party grab-bag gift!
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5.0 out of 5 stars More business books and software should be this good!, 23 Jan 1999
By A Customer
I found this book to be very good! It is quick and easy to read. I finished it on one plane trip. It is motivating and presents its ideas in 75 tips. I passed it along as a "must read" to peers in an executive roundtable group. All 75 tips are great, I have my own top six favorites including: 1. Do not get discouraged by the idea killers. 2. Never panic or lose your temper. 3. Always take a vacation. 4. Do something hard and lonely. 5. Think for 1 hour a day. 6. Try something new; like Neurosync behavior modification software. The author's validity in compiling this list added to my satisfaction of the book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Simple is the best, 16 July 1999
By A Customer
Coming from an Asian culture, I found this book's approach similar to Zen. No details, but simple, clear, and deep suggestions are found in this book. How to interpret these ideas is up to the reader. If some ideas are not for you, still you can learn a lot of other basic, universal ideas that are crucial to you as a leader. This book is definitely not for those who want step-by-step instructions but for those who are wise enough to get an essence.
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