Customer Reviews

471
4.1 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 24 September 2013
This little book is as some reviews indicated a simple message but it's a powerful message about how to deal with change in any aspect of your life.

It's very easy to read, and has a very core clear message about how to deal with change, and there are four characters in the story who deal with change differently, it follows their experiences.

Sniff & Scurry - who react fast to any changes
Hem - who is resistant to change and in denial
Haw - who is hesitant at first but then does adapt to change when he sees there can be something better from that

Buy the book, it gives you a clear story, you can see which characters you have been in your life, and learn to choose actively which you want to be in the future in any given situation. Some situations are awful and our responses fall into one of these categories, and how you react, will determine the outcome you get in your life, e.g. Hem can get into depression, and miss opportunities, Sniff can get new opportunities and quickly move on with his life, Haw is more cautious doesn't act at first, but then realizes he needs to also and ends up in a better place. It's also about your fears, changes, the unknown, and possibly that things can be much better, but without trying you don't know and can remain stuck like Hem, while life passes you by.

I see I have been Hem, Haw, and Scurry at various points in my life. This simple message gives you clarity on what and how you could be reacting, how you then choose to is up to you, and you can see the types of outcomes for each option. Great book, very effective imagery and messages.

Each person is different, and where you are in your life will impact what you take from this book's story. If you are fairly settled and on track in your life and goals, this is probably of less benefit to you but still worth a read. If you are dealing with change in any way, this is a useful book of clear simple messages and advice.

Buy it!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 22 June 2010
Who likes change? Not many of us, but life changes all around us, all the time, and it is how we deal with this change that makes the difference between going stagnant or flourishing.
The witty little addendum to the title sets the tone of the book. Dr Johnson uses a simple, child-like (note, not childish) analogy to provoke discussion on how to deal with change, in the workplace, home, school, church or anywhere, where change is needed, to not only survive, but to prosper.
Two small men and two mice live in a maze and have to go searching for cheese on a an almost daily basis in order to survive. However, the cheese 'stations' sometimes have lots of cheese and sometimes just a little. When the cheese runs out in one 'station' they have to go out searching for cheese elsewhere. The mice, Sniff and Scurry, seem to take this in their stride and go on searching whenever necessary. The men, Hem and Haw, as their names suggest have a bit of difficulty in accepting the continual changes in their supply of cheese, and their reactions to the situation prove an interesting source of discussion. (I will say no more here, so you will have to read it for yourself.)
This book has been used in many work situations and I have also recommended it to a local vicar who has found it very useful in the church setting.
An easy read, but if you are prepared to read past the simplistic style and setting, there is a lot of food (cheese!) for thought on how to deal positively to change in any aspect of your life.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
40 of 48 people found the following review helpful
on 22 November 2004
I thought I had seen it all with the One-Minute Manager School of BS Management but 'Who Moved my Cheese' sets new levels. A reality is created where mice/rats represent people and cheese represents salary and wages. Management feed on the anxiety of the rats by taking away their cheese (No wonder the Dilbert HR character is represented by a cat) but the rats who respond most positively to managements psychological 'game', are rewarded with chesse. It's very cheesy, very American, very condescending and very well stacked in favor of management. Dreadful, American, overhyped but well marketed BS - AVOID
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 April 2013
I can understand those who have said this book can seem incredibly patronising and insulting to the reader, but it really depends on the situation of said reader as well as their ability (or willingness) to take on board what is being said.

The individual has to use their own comparative method; read the scenarios and blend them with their own.

For a very small price, it's helpful if you're stuck in a psychological rut, but rid yourself of any ignorance towards it beforehand to truly feel the benefit.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 10 December 2012
After a clever bit of preconditioning, which uses a story about how someone really stupid doesn't get the book (you're not stupid are you?!) the over-stretched cheese metaphor begins.

I'm not saying that the basic principle that change will happen and you need to anticipate it and move with it is wrong - but if you have ready this sentence, you now know everything the book has to offer. The intelligent among you will not need a story about mice and tiny people to understand this.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on 9 September 2002
This book takes simple, common sense principles on dealing with change and turns them into a silly children's story. The useful concepts on dealing with change are totally overshadowed by the patronising, childish style. There is nothing new in this book, all the principles on dealing with change can be found in far better books which treat the reader as an adult. It is also very self-congratulatory, the authors coming across as thinking themselves very clever. I can't argue with that since they have inexplicably managed to hype this book into major success.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 24 November 2013
Like all these styles of books, we carry all the different character types in us however once identified it is how we use the knowledge.

The book is written as a story within a story; school friends get together and compare lives, where one has a simple but very true story to tell. 2 Mice (represent a more simple and basic approach to life) and 2 little creatures (the size of mice but a representative of us, more for the analytical brains than physical). The cheese is representative of any goal, achievement outcome.

I could see the characters represented in the workplace / home and how we are 1 in one situation and another in another

What I particularly liked was discussion between the friends after the story was given. All from different situations, the story was disucssed in relation to their background to this point and how the ideas in the story might be personally applied. I do this for a living and though in real life I've not seen many groups reflect in such an open way (some people may not like the style), I found it engaging.

I read the book on 4 hr flight. Actually I finished it in about 2.5 to 3 hours. A simple read!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
33 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on 6 May 2002
This is the kind of book that aims to teach and enlighten it's reader through a supposedly charming analogy... A tale of Mice and Men that illustrates different attitudes toward change. To be fair, my boss loved it. Personally, I found it tacky, insipid and grating. Agreed, there is a market for this, but since there have been four other reviews, I would suggest there are at least five of us who would have done better to carry on looking...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 4 June 2011
Who Moved My Cheese is a delightful little book which uses a group of mice chasing after cheese to explain how one has to be proactive and accept change and move with it, grow with it and allow change to affect our future for the better.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
When I read this book I thought it was a bit daft, having being told to read it along with a number of colleagues. I was more cynical when I noticed that one of the mice in the book (the one which didn't deal with change) was a bit like an ex-colleague and I suspected that's why we were reading it.

On reflection though, this is a clever little book using an abstract scenario (a bunch of mice looking for cheese) to relate to how we all have to handle change, and how the successful ones amongst us are those who deal with change best. It's written in a rather american-style with a font that's just too big (and even then it barely reaches 90 pages). However, if you think this book is going to change your life... don't be silly - what it really does is via the example of mice with different personalities it lets the reader consider what sort of mouse they would be and perhaps what sort you would like to be... a sort of self-help character improvement book.

Definitely recommended - not so much to be enlightened but to hopefully check you're on the right path in your career and life.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.