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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you haven't got it yet - get it quickly!!
When my computer freezes, my lack of technical expertise means that I sometimes have to undertake a hard re-boot -which means turning off the power and starting the infernal thing once again. At that time I need it to get working quickly, I don't want to read an indepth operators manual or get bogged down in unnecessary detail - I simply need a quick, straightforward and...
Published on 2 Feb. 2010 by B. I. D. Pearce

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Straight shooting & point blank
This is a straightforward compilation of good and sensible advice that anyone can apply regardless of which phase of their job they are in. And though some of the rationale is insightful, most of it is actually nothing new! Though it sometimes helps to have someone reiterate the obvious, and being reminded of the basics is also necessary, I however struggle to identify...
Published on 28 Jan. 2010 by Amazon Customer


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you haven't got it yet - get it quickly!!, 2 Feb. 2010
By 
B. I. D. Pearce "Bernard Pearce - Executive C... (Cheshire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
When my computer freezes, my lack of technical expertise means that I sometimes have to undertake a hard re-boot -which means turning off the power and starting the infernal thing once again. At that time I need it to get working quickly, I don't want to read an indepth operators manual or get bogged down in unnecessary detail - I simply need a quick, straightforward and uncluttered process to get me started again!

So if your Career has stalled, been interrupted by external or unforeseen challenges, or some company has turned the power off on your career as they turned out their own lights, then you need this book to help restart things for you -and quickly.

John Lees' ability to capture the key points of career transition and structure them in a very clear and straightforward way is to be admired and he should also be congratulated for keeping things tight, which is not easy when you have his level of knowledge and experience in career transition.

Yes there may be a thousand other questions you want to ask, but take the simple route - follow John's 24 top tips and then start looking at the finer points after you've got things back on track!

This book is a must and whole-heartedly recommend it. Probably the best value careers book on the market!

Bernard Pearce - Executive Career Transition Coach
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Straight shooting & point blank, 28 Jan. 2010
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
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This is a straightforward compilation of good and sensible advice that anyone can apply regardless of which phase of their job they are in. And though some of the rationale is insightful, most of it is actually nothing new! Though it sometimes helps to have someone reiterate the obvious, and being reminded of the basics is also necessary, I however struggle to identify whether it provides anything unique or presents anything in a different way or with more impact. It is though an easy and enjoyable read, and does serve as a helpful reminder not to get too set in our ways and that there is always something that we could do better.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cheaper than a recruitment advisor, 24 Mar. 2010
By 
Andy O'Boogie (Widnes, Cheshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
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This book is clear and straight to the point. You can pay a fortune for this sort of advice (and I bet there are a few who are using this book as the basis for their courses!). The book doesn't take long to read, which is good because it's one that needs reading several times. It needs reading before every job application and every job interview.

The first thing I did was remove the words CURRICULUM VITAE from the top of my CV, 'it makes the document look very old fashioned'...true!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Straight Forward Practical Advice, 4 Jan. 2010
By 
Mrs. A. Watt (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
This is a no-nonsense, user-friendly and highly accessible book. It is full of practical advice with a down to earth approach. It is easy and quick to read. Each chapter focuses on a specific topic and then gives a list of bullet points outlining things to do, think about or consider. Due to the way the topics are succinctly portrayed, it makes a useful reference book and will be a helpful tool for people embarking on a job search.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the short while needed to read it., 20 Jan. 2010
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I read this book first in just over an hour whilst on a train journey. At first I thought it was not going to teach me anything I did not already know and, I confess, I was disappointed because I have been out of the job market since 1999. My reason for ordering this book is because I had assumed that my past experience needed updating but I must admit that I have conducted interviews, sifted CVs and selected candidates for positions as part of my former career.

The good news is that not that much has changed after all but it was still a useful refresher and boosted my confidence to know this at least. It does seem to refer a lot to those who have been made redundant but, with the exception of things like getting advice on investing your pay off and careful budgeting, this does not preclude from being of assistance to anyone looking for work.

Most helpful chapters for me include:

Chapter 4 - what gets in the way? The message is that the most powerful barriers are the ones we create in our thoughts and the need to accept responsibility ourselves to make it happen.

Chapter 8 - work with the market, don't blame it. How to find out about the hidden job market (majority of jobs are not advertised). You begin with your network of contacts from work and anyone with professional experience in your family & friends. Also try social networking sites to broaden your horizons - see Chapter 9 - understanding the new rules of work. Tell them briefly, clearly and positively what you want and ask for help with research into sectors and organisations, rather than for vacancies. Conclude by asking for recommendations of other people to talk to. Accept that work experience now includes freelancing, temporary, contract, seasonal and unpaid work. Senior posts are often filled by freelancers brought in to deal with specific problems and, sometimes, kept on afterwards.

Chapter 11 - getting past the age barrier. At 47 I guess this is something I need to be aware of and, as the book says, I mustn't let it take centre stage. I should be focussing on the plus points, knowledge, maturity & reliability. Tips include removing references to out of fate technology or no longer existing employers and provide recent evidence of my willingness to learn new skills, e.g. in my case voluntary work as a CAB adviser and doing a degree with the Open University. Include an email address to show I am IT literate and demonstrate an active interest in new technology and ways of working.

Chapter 14 - don't rewrite your CV, rethink it. Use a great opening profile for a great first impression (think radio ad as decisions made in first 20 seconds), avoid empty adjectives and claims unsupported by evidence. Don't pigeon hole yourself into too narrow a field; avoid stating the obvious if job titles say it all. Include a target job statement or indication of the right ingredients in your next role. Put the strongest statement at the beginning of each paragraph and the strongest bullet point at the top of each list.

Chapter 15 explains why CVs tend to get ignored and offers tips on presentation and things to include as well as to avoid e.g. no photographs, jobs over 15 years ago, salary requirements, referees etc and yes to active verbs, short words and phrases. Include keywords or phrases that would be flagged up if CV text was to be searched electronically.

Chapter 18 - standing square to interview questions. Preparing yourself with good, short answers to the standard questions (e.g. "where do you see yourself in 5 years time ?" and how to get across that you have what is required for this job and why you are a better bet than everyone else being interviewed. In Chapter 19 this is expanded to looking for examples of things like when you overcame a difficulty or influenced someone positively. The book suggests expressing some achievements in measureable terms if possible.

Perhaps my favourite chapter is Chapter 23 - how do I find the right role? A checklist for working out what you'd ideally like to do including the final question "If you won the lottery, played with the money for two years and then got bored, what would you do to occupy your time?"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Full of common sense ideas most of us neglect, 17 Jan. 2010
By 
Mo "mo79uk" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
This book by John Lees came at just the right time. I'm employed, but certainly needed rebooting and so have been half-heartedly searching after failed applications.
This book gives great advice on how to set yourself up and tackle either job hunting after redundancy, or finding a new career.
At times it seems obvious, giving advice on not to give up, or to get out there and talk to people..... but however obvious, it's amazing how quickly it can be omitted in everyday life. How many hours are spent searching through job sites, sending off generic emails and set CVs without really taking a step back and thinking about the process.
This book reminds you that a lot of it is networking, talking to people, even reminding your friends about your job and staying positive throughout as you never know when the next conversation will lead to a new opportunity.
It gave a new outlook on it all, and stresses the need to take a step back at times and not to be afraid to ask for help by getting support from friends.

Initially a bit sceptical about any type of "self help" books, I found this one to be really down to earth, straightforward and informative. The chapters are short and to the point giving advice in bullet points, and doesn't talk down at the reader, and although it may not seem groundbreaking to read it does teach the reader something new about job hunting.
I certainly found it to be food for thought and am using tips from within it to encourage myself not to give up or give in.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fresh Ammunition for the Job Hunter, 25 Dec. 2009
By 
R. F. Stevens "richard23491" (Ickenham UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This small book is a collection of bullets summarising the necessary sets of points one should address when considering job or career changes. It covers all the right ideas, outlines good practice and promotes the merits of enthusiasm and being positive.

I wish I had been given this when I was going through all my career changes; six different jobs with a short spell of redundancy in the middle, but now retired and doing light consultancy and more importantly - what I want to do. It could have made life so much simpler and less stressful if I had been able to summarize so succinctly, as in here, what I needed to do when looking at the next job.

There are twenty four chapters plus some brief introductory material. Each chapter averages about a two and a half pages with some text and about ten bullet-paragraphs. This might seem very brief, and so it is, but each point is relevant and concise, and I only noticed a few repetitions of points across different chapters. There is also a taster chapter from another of the author's related books tacked on the end.

It strongly reminds me of the collection of presentation slides one is given in a handout after attending a course; the bullet points rounding off the chapter are the slide, and the few paragraphs at the beginning of the chapter are gleaned from the text the presenter relates to his audience .

The main problem I see with this book is that while it is necessary, it is not sufficient. It lacks any specific examples of good practice, perhaps a few sample CVs, a few sample covering letters, relevant rules for composing emails, I could go on. The bullet-paras say what not to do, and what to do, and if one already knows then this is a very handy aide-memoire. But, but, but, if this is the first time back on the job search, after maybe having been handed the first job on a plate, then all the missing examples make a difficult chasm to cross. If there was a set of references for further reading, or a link to a website carrying such examples then I would give it five stars. Lacking these, sadly I can only award four stars.

Having been there myself, and now seeing it with others around me, I think that perhaps the other significant problem is that many of those cast into unemployment or dead-end jobs are also deeply depressed and trapped in shut-down denial, or are running-standing-still in the headless-chicken mode of frantic displacement activity, and therefore unable to focus on what really needs to be done. And these unfortunates are the least likely ones to read this book, even though they stand to gain the most.

So is it any good? Yes. But it could be a lot better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clear and to the point, well worth reading, 24 Dec. 2009
By 
Jason Jesson "Jason J" (Yorkshire, United Kingdom.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I was fortunate enough to receive an advance copy of this guide. It is written by a well known author and speaker on career matters.

The guide is well structured and follows a logical path from thought provoking across cv tips, dealing with agencies, networking and interviews.

Interestingly, the guide expands upon external factors such as declining industries and transferrable skills - both major considerations in todays marketplace.

A handy feature includes dealing with dead ends, agency excuses and other pitfalls along the pathway to rebooting a career.

On dealing with issues such as age, the guide does lean on positive angles such as relevant experience. It also goes into some detail around career consultants and adaptability into a similar role.

I would have liked to have seen more about career tools such as beating the competition, effective selling over the phone and also looking the part for interviews. However, this guide is a basic and practical starting block - very handy for those new to career issues and only feel they have local agencies and government departments for support.

Overall, I would definately add this to my collection and re-read certain chapters before interviews and critical conversations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly Short, Sharp and to the Point - the injection you need to reboot your career, 18 Jan. 2010
By 
Sara Dewar "Gotta Love Learning" (Edinburgh, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times

This book is the perfect start for anyone looking to inject their career with a fresh perspective quickly and without reading pages and pages of business speak.

John Lees has written a number of hugely practical, easily readable books on career awareness, CV writing and interview success but this one is the 'study guide' or 'crib sheet' of these.

If you are are facing redundancy, want to rethink your career, or maybe want to explore your options, this is the book that will enable you to get started quickly.

It doesn't have all the answers - it's a guide, hence the strap line '24 tips for tough times' - but the couple of hours (maximum) that it will take you to read this will leave you energised, focused and very clear on what you personally need to do next.

Lees has all the indepth guidance and support you will need in his other books - the beauty of buying this one is that you will know which of the others are right for you to invest your precious cash and time in.

Buy this one before you buy the others - and then keep it handy to help you stay motivated and focused.

Enjoy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Simple quick read to keep you on track, 19 Feb. 2010
By 
This review is from: Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times (Paperback)
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I cannot fault John Lees, the number of books of his I have read and each one was spot on, and this one is no different despite it being shorter than many others.

I think given the subject it is actually a benefit that this book is as short as it is a quick and simple read, it's perfect to give you a little boost if your job search has gone a little off course since the jobs market went into chaos. It has key tips that apply to a wide range of people and is clear enough that it can be of real benefit to many different people too. The whole book is very to the point and covers all the basis, it doesn't waffle on like many self-help career guides, it's targeted it's audience well as you don't feel like jumping off a bridge reading through it if you're unemployed as you do with many career self-help books. You can get through the whole thing and start putting the ideas into action very quickly, with the jobs market changing so often and jobs being snapped up fast this book gives you not only great advice and tips, but things that are going to help you immediately.
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Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times
Career Reboot: 24 Tips for Tough Times by John Lees (Paperback - 1 Dec. 2009)
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