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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read
Being a Medical student, this book was a nice little treat for me. The book aims to explore the relationship between the patient and the medic, with particular emphasis placed on the interactive environment.

This is essentially a book written very much for practicing medics or those looking to get into the field. That should not deter the general public to...
Published on 18 Jan 2010 by Fireball Dragon

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful book, but perhaps not the best of its kind
Like one of the other reviewers here, this was the first time I had been offered this type of book. I am not medically qualified, but do work in healthcare and the overall aims of the book seemed to have more than a few areas of overlap with my job.

I have read similar books to this in our hospital library, and from my limited experience would say that this is...
Published on 12 Jan 2010 by DJ Bez


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful book, but perhaps not the best of its kind, 12 Jan 2010
By 
DJ Bez (Weston-super-Mare) - See all my reviews
This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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Like one of the other reviewers here, this was the first time I had been offered this type of book. I am not medically qualified, but do work in healthcare and the overall aims of the book seemed to have more than a few areas of overlap with my job.

I have read similar books to this in our hospital library, and from my limited experience would say that this is probably not the best book of its kind on the topic; nor is it the best value for money at only 142 pages and being new, with few second hand copies available.

It is however well laid out, I might go so far as to say uniquely when compared to the others I have read, and many of the ideas within seem both original and practical. There is certainly nothing within that strikes me as being bad or ill advised (only from my viewpoint, of course) but as always this means a great deal of the text is dedicated to common sense which we (should!) all have in our respective fields!

However, I did not find reading this book to be a chore, and for the very newly qualified doctor or indeed anyone else who is or aspires to work in healthcare, it could be a good investment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Trite self help manual, 31 Mar 2010
By 
R. M. Lindley - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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The intentions of this book are honorable, but it tries to do too much, offering advice on topics as diverse as stress management to successful parenting. It fails to do more than offer platitudes and trite advice (on parenting - don't smother your children, but don't be too remote either. Find a balance... etc, etc).

As a doctor with 10 years of experience, I cannot see how someone genuinely having problems could find this book useful.

It lacks detail.

Avoid.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 18 Jan 2010
By 
Fireball Dragon (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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Being a Medical student, this book was a nice little treat for me. The book aims to explore the relationship between the patient and the medic, with particular emphasis placed on the interactive environment.

This is essentially a book written very much for practicing medics or those looking to get into the field. That should not deter the general public to read this, as it provides an insight into the working environment of the dilemas that health professionals face.

The book is divided into the following chapters:-

A new meaning for 'first do no harm' in the 21st century
Make your own contribution to a great legacy
On being a Doctor
Our relationship with ourselves
Our relationship with our own Doctor
Our relationship with our families and friends
Our relationship with our colleagues
Our relationship with our patients
Our relationship with our physical environment
Our relationship with our medical organisations
Dealing with a major personal crisis
Eight principles for being a resilient doctor

As indicated by the individual chapters, the book very much strives to question the relationships that a practicing Dr. faces and related coping mechanisms. This come across to be a very 'Dr's' book, but can be enjoyed by everyone. I would strongly urge practicing medics to pick up a copy, as so much can be learnt from here.

Being a good Dr. means more than just having medical knowledge and experience. It is about having excellent communication skills and the ability to understand your own strengths and limitations, something many Drs. fail to acknowledge. Medicine as a career is very, very stressful and makes one look at 'life' in a completely different manner.

Away from the content, the book is aesthetically very pleasing and is well constructed, despite being a paperback. I particularly liked the unique font on the front (please see picture) and the artwork which does a fantastic job of catching your eye.

The book does however try to cram a lot of information into a small package of around 130 pages of text. Additionally, some chapters are a little repetitive and go on to explore (briefly) issues about racial discrimination and bullying in the work place, etc. Of course such issues are important, but I just felt that this book was not the place to discuss them.

All-in-all, a pleasant read that I enjoyed. This one stays on my book shelf throughout my coming career! 4/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not just for doctors, but allow for the authors being Australian, 20 Feb 2010
By 
Joanne K. Pilsworth (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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Working in the pharmaceutical industry for the past thirteen years, I have encountered a fair number of doctors and medical professionals, some of whom were, unfortunately, unable to cope with the stress of the changing medical world. Gone are the days when the doctor's word was law. Now they must contend with guidelines, financial constraints, expectations of patients and a whole raft of other things. Yes, they might earn a good salary, but so does an airline pilot and for a similar reason: they are trusted with lives.

So enough soapboxing. Why is this book worth four stars? Written by a pair of Australian GPs, and I have nothing against Australians, the book offers good solid advice to doctors on surviving the medical world as it is today. I was surprised that a proportion of doctors don't actually have their own doctor (is that an Australian thing?), but the fact remains that they work in a stressful profession, and sometimes need help. There is advice on avoiding the cycle of negative thinking, simple meditation and breathing exercises which can fit into a busy day. There is a reminder of health checks that should be considered by everyone and the point is emphasised that it should not be seen as a sign of weakness that one needs to seek help.

Whilst the book is aimed at the medical profession, the advice contained makes sense to anyone in a high-pressure profession, which may be open to feelings of fatigue and negativity.

If I have one criticism, it is that there are frequent references to the Australian College of General Practitioners and their rules. Thus, if a UK based medical professional were looking at this book, they would need to take this into account.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A helpful quick read, 15 Feb 2010
This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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In First Do No Harm, general practitioners Leanne Rowe and Michael Kidd offer advice to doctors about protecting their own wellbeing. The book starts with some inspirational stories of Australian doctors who overcame adversity and left lasting legacies in their clinical work. The rest of the book offers advice and strategies for doctors on how to maintain their health, wellbeing and relationships.

First Do No Harm is very accessible and quick to read. Although the book does not delve deeply or comprehensively, it does offer useful supportive advice, guidance and reassurance in an easily swallowed dose.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars First do no Harm, 12 Feb 2010
By 
S. Thomas - See all my reviews
(No. 1 Hall OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
`First do no harm' is primarily aimed at those working in medicine but is described as also being a comfortable read for anyone. In other words, the underlying message of the book has relevance to human beings as a whole. It deals with life issues that everyone has to face from time to time and the fact that only a paragraph or two is dedicated to each topic makes it user-friendly.

The book contains a number of self help/awareness exercises, as well as information and advice in relation to topics such as stress management (as well as understanding the signs of stress), time management and how to look after yourself in general. Information is presented in bullet-form or short paragraphs, a bit like a taster menu rather than a full three-course meal.

I found the book was approachable - by that I mean that it is well written, informative, the print size was not off-putting and it is not overly long at 142 pages. In addition, the cover for the book is designed to make it feel like it has been well-thumbed and loved.

Don't be put off by the sub title `being a resilient doctor in the 21st century'. If you are a lay person like me, you have the potential to get something out of the book. Topics are not overly dwelt on and a lot is covered in the space available in the book. I would describe it as a book that will serve to heighten self-awareness in relation to life issues that many of us will face from time to time and act as a prompt for exploring subjects of interest in greater detail.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nice Idea, Shame About Execution, 5 Feb 2010
By 
Ben Saunders (Stirling, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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Firstly, I should say that I'm no doctor - rather I'm a university lecturer in philosophy and ordered this book because I thought it might be about medical ethics. In fact, that's not exactly the case - rather, its main argument is that doctors ought not to neglect their own interests or they risk burnout from stress and fatigue.

While doctors have long striven not to harm their patients, they also need to show more regard for themselves, their families and their colleagues - thus the maxim 'do no harm' needs to be interpreted more broadly than has traditionally been the case. (It's not entirely clear whether the reason for this claim is purely instrumental - since the authors claim it will allow doctors to take better care of their patients - or whether they would accept some loss in patient care for the good of doctors.)

I think that this is a worthwhile message. It's certainly one I can sympathise with, despite not being a doctor, since academics are subject to many similar pressures, to balance research and teaching, to deal with ever-increasing administration and assessment, and with uncertain job security. Anyone who struggles to balance a demanding professional career, 'driven' personality and healthy relationships or private life could potentially benefit from this lesson, despite the medical focus.

However, I don't think there's really enough here to justify a book of even this short length. Much of it is crammed full of unnecessary lists, quotations, and grey fact boxes, when surely doctors shouldn't need to be told the symptoms of common diseases or stress - merely reminded to look out for themselves too. Much of it is rather obvious or familiar from self-help books like Pursuit of Perfect UK edition (PB) and The Resiliency Advantage: Master Change, Thrive Under Pressure, and Bounce Back from Setbacks, so while it underlines challenges facing doctors and focuses our attention on meeting them, it's not brimming with practical solutions.

Consequently, while I applaud the intent, what we have here is I think a good idea executed badly - the book is over-long, repetitive, and full of relatively useless information.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Strategies for medics to relax..., 28 Jan 2010
By 
Romayne Wright "Ha Tikvah" (N. Ireland U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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This is an interesting book aimed at enabling doctors to find ways in which to better cope with the stresses of their job. The author proposes 8 principles towards being a resilient doctor such as making home a sanctuary, controlling stress, and recognising conflict as an opportunity. Fairly radical themes in some respects, but she discusses them in a meaningful manner. Much of what is written is common sense but many doctors may appreciate the structured approach to better dealing with certain aspects of their job which may not be openly discussed such as how to cope with their own ill health when it happens.

This book is likely to be best appreciated by the younger first or second year doctors, who want to figure out fast how to manage their work and home life so as not to become a casualty of their career.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Stress Bucket List., 19 Jan 2010
This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
In other words, a self-help book designed for doctors and related health professionals. Much contained is applicable to most people under stress and at risk of burnout.

The design is rather fussy, with several typefaces cluttering up the page. Otherwise it's easily accessible. The message is simple and often 'common sense' approach to keeping healthy. It may seem to simple and patronising to some doctors ("I already know this stuff"), but go with it: You'll do those things you know you should do, but don't.
It's the obvious things that get overlooked when complexity at work seems insurmountable. This book offers ways of changing your view and finding ways to correct what's gone wrong. By making those lists and examining your intentions and what needs to be achieved, it gives a fresh perspective. So keep going, even when it asks you to drain your "Stress buckets", it can be worthwhile. And it's a small book, quickly readable (if a tad padded in places); you can fit it in your busy schedule. Doctors may know all this, but sometimes you need a book to nudge you in the right direction.

It seems strange to question a doctors welfare as being important to good service. Obviously it does, long hours and constant pressures will cause good care standards to slip. So doctors must pay close attention to just being human from time to time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars useful book for doctors old and new, 29 Dec 2009
By 
L. Bretherton "dempie" (Tiverton, Devon) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: First Do No Harm: Being a Resilient Doctor in the 21st Century: Being a Resilent Doctor in the 21st Century (Paperback)
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This book is written to help doctors cope with the demands of their jobs. It explains the different stresses associated with the profession, how to recognise the symptoms of that stress, and how to deal with them. However, unlike other self-help books, this one covers the specifics of working in medicine, from handling psychotic patients in the GP's surgery to dealing with stalker patients. It also covers the duty of care to colleagues which all doctors have, ie what to do when someone in your firm is resorting to the bottle too much, or making errors of judgement which could affect patients' wellbeing. Keeping a healthy balance between home life and work is emphasised, and there are lots of useful recommendations on how to achieve that. I would definitely recommend this as an addition for any doctor's bookshelf.
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