Customer Reviews


5 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The (W)Right Authority
Wright has written at great length about his views on the authority of Scripture, especially in NTPG. You get the impression that when he dedicates the book to Stephen Sykes and Robin Eames, the chairs of two boards Wright sits on, it is more than just a polite nod in their direction. This book seems to be a rapid response to a particular set of issues facing him in his...
Published on 5 Feb 2007 by Mr. Kevin Hargaden

versus
11 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Yes, but in what sense is Scripture the word of God?
This book is a mixed bag as far as I'm concerned. I was helped by much of what was said, puzzled about what was left unsaid.

It an attempt to get `beyond the Bible wars' (from the subtitle of the American edition), Wright (deliberately?) omits any meaningful affirmation and explication of Scripture as the inspired word of God.

Wright defines...
Published on 9 Oct 2008 by Jonathan Mason


Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The (W)Right Authority, 5 Feb 2007
By 
Mr. Kevin Hargaden (Maynooth, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Wright has written at great length about his views on the authority of Scripture, especially in NTPG. You get the impression that when he dedicates the book to Stephen Sykes and Robin Eames, the chairs of two boards Wright sits on, it is more than just a polite nod in their direction. This book seems to be a rapid response to a particular set of issues facing him in his ministry.

As such, it is a brilliant little book. In 100 pages it is never going to resolve the labyrinthine issues that face anyone asking the question "How can the Bible be authoritative" but Wright posts up a few signs in the right direction.

Superb illustrations and turns of phrase abound leaving you very clear as to what the author intends as he steps into a morass of contested terms. It is a superb little book to get one thinking anew on this crucial topic. Accessible to any interested reader. I cannot lay any major faults at its door.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Yes, but in what sense is Scripture the word of God?, 9 Oct 2008
By 
Jonathan Mason "Walking With Giants" (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is a mixed bag as far as I'm concerned. I was helped by much of what was said, puzzled about what was left unsaid.

It an attempt to get `beyond the Bible wars' (from the subtitle of the American edition), Wright (deliberately?) omits any meaningful affirmation and explication of Scripture as the inspired word of God.

Wright defines `inspiration' in the following terms:-

"By his Spirit God guided the very different writers and editors, so that the books they produced were the books God intended his people to have."

Well, yes. But in the providence of God something similar could be said of any collection of books. For Wright, divine inspiration seems to imply divine providence, but the real question is whether inspiration implies divine endorsement.

It's OK to list some of the more troublesome misreadings of the `Right' and of the `Left' (78-81). It's helpful to be urged to see our role within the "five acts" of the narrative (creation, fall, Israel, Christ, the church). It's fine to be reminded that our reading of Scripture should be "totally contextual," "liturgically guided, "privately studied," "refreshed by appropriate scholarship," and "taught by the church's accredited leaders" (84-104).

But Wright simply does not discuss the most pressing question about the authority of Scripture. In Scripture, `the Word of God' implies, among other things, divine speech. We need to know, then, in what sense and to what extent the words of the Bible can be regarded as the words of God. On this point, he is unhelpfully silent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Scripture as story: one narrative or many ?, 28 Oct 2006
By 
Jeremy Bevan (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I found much to appreciate in this recent and very readable offering from Tom Wright, but was ultimately left somewhat disappointed. I initially found attractive his notion of the authority of Scripture as being situated within, and therefore part of, the broader story of God's dealing with humankind. However, it becomes increasingly apparent through the book that this story - or at least Wright's perspective on it - is quite a narrow one: what starts off looking like a postmodern attempt to throw off the modernist clothing of an 'it's-either-true-or-it's-not' approach ends up being just as much of a narrative straitjacket as what it seeks to replace. Nowhere is this more apparent than when the author is dealing with early 'challenges' (a framing which is in itself instructive), such as the interpretations of Marcion and the so-called 'gnostics' as they attempt to engage with Scripture. A growing body of scholarship places at least parts of these stories, too, within the broad story of early Christianity. I take the point of Wright's well-made and timely pleas for greater engagement with Scripture. At the same time, I couldn't help feeling that weaving in more of the strands would have made for a richer, fairer and more honest account that would do justice to the sheer narrative diversity of Christian experience of Scripture.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 44 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Could be clearer, 13 Oct 2005
By 
G. J. Weeks (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Refreshing and perplexing is how I found my first experience of reading the new Bishop of Durham. God's authority is excercised through Scripture is his thesis. I do not think he would add a Reformation sola, alone there, or would he? No, I think not. Wright gives us a good survey of how Scripture has been used and misused in church history. His ctitique of Enlightenment rationalism is a joy to read but I am not clear how he gets both liberals and fundamentalists to be heirs of Enlightenment.
He gives examples of what he considers misreadings of Scripture from both left and right. I only fall foul of one of his condemnations, believing capital punishment by the state is required by Scripture. Wright rules it out because he says many Church Fathers did. An appeal to tradition?
I understand from this what the good bishop does not believe but I think he could have clarified to us just what his belief really does mean. Perhaps the post-modernism he critiques so well has left him averse to giving a new creedal formulation for today concerning the authority of Scripture? Perhaps I need to read him again and more slowly. One thing I would have to look for is whether or not he ever uses the term evangelical in his work.
Revealed truth does need to be restated to meet the needs of the 21st century but is it to much too ask for a concise formula on Scripture, and the authority of God, preferrably one that could be used liturgically to confess the faith once delivered before the watching world?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 8 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Scripture and the Authority of God: How to Read the Bible Today (Paperback)
Very very important read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Scripture and the Authority of God: How to Read the Bible Today
Scripture and the Authority of God: How to Read the Bible Today by N. T. Wright (Paperback - 19 Mar 2013)
8.98
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews