Customer Reviews


49 Reviews
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Sayers.
I am glad to find so many favorable reviews of this, Dorothy L Sayers' final detective fiction novel, on the internet. It failed to find much favor with the public or the critics when it was written in the late 1930s. In actual need of the income that her earlier works in this genre had generated (she had to support not only herself but also a non-productive husband and...
Published on 7 Dec 2002 by John Austin

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs partitioning.
I do enjoy the Peter Wimsey stories. Ian Carmichael portrays Lord Peter flawlessly. Some of these radio serials as is this one, when transferred to CD are presented in gigantic chunks with no introduction and no ending credits. I realise that this stuff is on the jewel case but when the tapes were released it was altogether nicer as the individual episodes were preserved...
Published 18 months ago by D. Morley


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Sayers., 7 Dec 2002
By 
John Austin "austinjr@bigpond.net.au" (Kangaroo Ground, Australia) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
I am glad to find so many favorable reviews of this, Dorothy L Sayers' final detective fiction novel, on the internet. It failed to find much favor with the public or the critics when it was written in the late 1930s. In actual need of the income that her earlier works in this genre had generated (she had to support not only herself but also a non-productive husband and an illegitimate son), she negotiated with her publisher to "once again try my hand at detective fiction" after he had pointed out that the market seemed to have become saturated.
Just as a busman's holiday is a vacation where the busman is likely to be as involved with driving as he is throughout the rest of the year, a busman's honeymoon (a phrase which she coined) is one where the busman (in this case Lord Peter Wimsey) is likely to spend his honeymoon checking alibis, interviewing murder suspects, observing rigor mortis, and all the other tiresome activities of an amateur detective.
Lord Peter and Harriet Vane are the honeymooners. After their wedding (reported in a series of letters that begin the novel), they travel to "Talboys", a country house chosen by Harriet. Their reception is not as predicted. Eventually Lord Peter's butler, Bunter, discovers a corpse in the cellar.
The novel began life as a play, as you may infer from the many static scenes involving a large ensemble of characters entering and exiting. The prose is as rich in wit, classical illusions and sophistication as you will ever encounter in detective fiction. Dorothy L. Sayers was an honours graduate and capable of writing as well as George Eliot.
Don't expect the kind of fast food satisfaction that Agatha Christie provided so successfully. You will find instead the full silver service dining and wining experience here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books ever, 5 April 2002
By A Customer
Dorothy L Sayers is always a cut above your average crime novelist, especially in the Harriet Vane novels (Strong Poison, Have His Carcase, Gaudy Night and Busman's Honeymoon). Busman's Honeymoon can't quite decide if it is a love story or a detective story ... but that really doesn't matter, it's a great example of both, with characters that really live. Read it ... but you'll enjoy it all the more if you start with Strong Poison and work your way up to it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and ingenious murder mystery., 20 Dec 2000
By A Customer
This has to be my favourite Dorothy L. Sayers mystery! Lord Peter Wimsey has finally persuaded his beloved Harriet Vane to become his wife but married life does not run smoothly for them. Their honeymoon is marred by the discovery of a body in the cellar, and naturally they feel duty-bound to investigate. As with all Sayers' novels, the plot is both gripping and original. In addition the atmosphere of Britain in the 1930s is captured brilliantly, adding an extra dimension to the book. If you enjoy reading Agatha Christie you will love Dorothy L. Sayers (who in my opinion is a far better writer).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The final D L Sayer's Lord Peter Wimsey novel, 17 Oct 2011
I always regard Dorothy L Sayer's books as a bit of a challenge. Compared to Agatha Christie's novels they are not a light read, but I do feel that they are worth the effort as they are high quality, very literary books. Dorothy L Sayers was a well educated lady and attended Oxford having won a scholarship to Somerville College. When I first started to read her novels I found them difficult, stuffy almost rather "elite" books, not for ordinary people but over time I have come to enjoy them. I have to admit that I usually warm myself up to one of her books by listening to the BBC audio dramatisation of the book, this helps me to get a feel for the book and the characters before plunging myself into it. But I always stop listening before they get to the stage of revealing "who done it" as I like to preserve that pleasure for the actual book. Busman's Honeymoon is definitely not a good place to start if you have never read any of D L Sayer's books before. There is a character development that moves from book to book and I would advise any new reader to start with one of her earlier works. Her first novel was Whose Body? followed by Clouds of Witness and Unnatural Death. Busman's Honeymoon comes right at the end of the series. I would also recommend the books that were written by D L Sayers and Jill Paton Walsh, I actually found these to be more readable than the books written solely by D L Sayers, although again as these come very much later in the series they perhaps should be saved until you have read more of D L Sayer's earlier works. D L Sayer's is said to have remarked that she never writes down to her readers, she expects her readers to rise up to her expectations of them. A remark that almost put me off reading her books but I am pleased that I have persisted as they are very intelligent crime novels with enough unusual touches to make them unique. Busman's Honeymoon concentrates a little less on the actual crime itself compared to other books, but I think that it can still be fairly considered to be a crime novel. There are many literary references throughout the book, Lord Peter and one the detectives frequently exchange quotations from Shakespeare, this just stops short of being too much. However, there are quite a few passages that are written in French, and whilst I am sure that these are not hugely relevant to the important elements of the plot I did find it more than a little annoying and pretentious to assume that sufficient numbers of your readers would be sufficiently fluent in large passages of French to put them into a book. But these are relatively minor criticisms, Busman's Honeymoon is a book that D L Sayer's fans should probably read as it nicely rounds off elements of her books which began back in Strong Poison.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good characterisation, 1 Feb 2001
By A Customer
The actors who give their voices to the various characters in this audiobook are excellent, but the same cannot be said for the story. Whilst for most of the dramatisation it stays pretty faithful to the book (making allowances for the fact that it obviously cannot be the same since it is a dramatisation and not a reading of the book), the ending has changed.
The book has a much more sombre ending, and this tape ends in laughter, which is really not the point of this story.
However this is really only the last few words spoken, and apart from that it is a delight to listen to.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs partitioning., 1 Jan 2013
By 
D. Morley "DougMorley" (Chilliwack, BC, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I do enjoy the Peter Wimsey stories. Ian Carmichael portrays Lord Peter flawlessly. Some of these radio serials as is this one, when transferred to CD are presented in gigantic chunks with no introduction and no ending credits. I realise that this stuff is on the jewel case but when the tapes were released it was altogether nicer as the individual episodes were preserved just as broadcast with introductory music and credits.

Two CDs with no proper break makes for less than pleasant listening.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars great but some wooden acting, 1 July 2009
By 
John L. Baker "Trasgarian" (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought this as I had never seen the final book enacted on the TV with Mr Petherbridge as Wimsey. The story was the usual well thought out plot and conclusion. Having a visualisation of the players was also an assistance, to me anyway, although Bunter didn't quite match the minds eye.

The only criticism was of some rather wooden acting by the peripheral players. Overall however, it provided an entertaining long car journey.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 27 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Such a pleasure to hear the wonderful voice of Ian Carmichael in the lead role, terrific tale set in an era long, long since gone. One to keep and listen to again and again. Recommended
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Last completed novel containing Harriet Vane., 1 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Lord Peter Wimsey) (Paperback)
The title "Busman's Honeymoon" is sort of a play on words. Look up busman's holiday in the dictionary. In fact it was a play that was also made into a movie "Haunted Honeymoon" (1940) starring Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. There are still some short stories and a novel finished by someone else; however Busman's Honeymoon is the last of the novel series containing Harriet Vane. Some of the short stories are "The Haunted Policeman" and "Talboys."

The book starts off with a series of letters from well-known friends of the couple, described previous in Dorothy L. Sayers' novels. They bring you up to date while describing the wedding of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. Some of the charters are just referenced yes it ought on and you will have to have read the previous novels for fuller detail.

The primary thrust of this novel is the relationship between Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. With exquisite descriptions of their life and the English environment in which they live. Oh yes, there is also an intriguing mystery for the couple to solve. However the mystery does not overshadow the rest of the story.

One of the most important overlooked items in most descriptions of this book is the expanded explanation of the history and relationship of Bunter to Lord Peter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must-read for Wimsey and Vane fans, 30 Mar 2008
This is a much more intimate and passionate examination of Peter and Harriet's relationship than the other Wimsey stories. Now that they are married, Sayers is much more willing in particular to show Harriet's emotions to her husband and I had mixed feelings about it. In the previous books, Harriet has always been concerned about her independence but now that she's married, she falls into the traditional wifely role of supporting her husband. In many ways, she defers to her husband and his needs and whilst Sayers also features an emotional compromise on the part of Peter as he learns that there are aspects of his life that he has to share, including the bad parts of his character - I'm not sure that it's truly a marriage of equals.

There's also an examination of Bunter's role in the family and Sayers takes time to show the awkwardness that Harriet feels at effectively interloping in his relationship with his master. Sayers doesn't have it run smoothly and it's interesting to get Bunter's perspective on the love affair and how he views Harriet. In fact, Bunter suffers a great deal in this book as his love of control and having everything perfect is challenged by the spiteful and unthinking Mrs Ruddles. In fact, my least favourite part of the book is when Bunter (admittedly under great pressure) finally loses his temper with Mrs Ruddles after she disturbs some very expensive port and makes it undrinkable. For the first time, Bunter's veneer drops and he descends into Cockney abuse. For me, this seemed completely out-of-character for him and I felt very disappointed in him.

Sayers alludes to what happened to Peter during the war and how he and Bunter came to hook up, which is interesting. The final section of the book is where Peter's attitude to the death penalty really comes out, giving him a psychological depth that has not really been present in the other books in the series.

The book begins with the attitude of Peter's family to his marriage and when Harriet visits his ancestral home for the first time, Sayers sneaks in some paranormal activity, which would be distracting in less competent hands. The mystery element is rather perfunctory, but the book is interesting nonetheless and there are enough red herrings to keep readers guessing. For Wimsey fans, this is a must-read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Busman's Honeymoon (Lord Peter Wimsey)
Busman's Honeymoon (Lord Peter Wimsey) by Dorothy L. Sayers (Paperback - 16 Oct 2012)
8.74
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews