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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An All-Time Crime Classic
This classic Christie whodunit has borne three different titles, which has been the source of some confusion. Originally published in England under the title "Ten Little Niggers" in 1939, it was retitled "And Then There Were None" for its 1940 American edition for obvious reasons. However, the English stage version of 1943 retained the "Niggers" title while the American...
Published on 1 Mar. 2003 by A. Ross

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars didn't enjoy it as much as Poirot
Really wanted to re-read this story, it's OK, probably showing it's age now, didn't enjoy it as much as Poirot.
Published 9 months ago by Pam Rose


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An All-Time Crime Classic, 1 Mar. 2003
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This classic Christie whodunit has borne three different titles, which has been the source of some confusion. Originally published in England under the title "Ten Little Niggers" in 1939, it was retitled "And Then There Were None" for its 1940 American edition for obvious reasons. However, the English stage version of 1943 retained the "Niggers" title while the American stage version ran as "Ten Little Indians." Even more confusingly, the first film version, released in 1945, bore the American "And Then There Were None" title, while the three subsequent adaptations (1965, 1975, and 1989) took the "Ten Little Indians" title! The original offensive title comes from a Victorian-era music-hall song, which itself was a rip-off of an American song by Septimus Winner, circa 1868. All of which is neither here nor there, but only to help clear up any confusion. I would note that the most recent French edition bears the title "Dix petit negres", which somehow does not surprise me...
As for the actual novel, it's perhaps the ultimate whodunit of the "locked house" variety. Ten people are summoned to an island off the Devon coast, none of them know each other or their ostensible host. The story starts by showing the ten en route to the island and provides a brief character sketch of each as background. I have to confess that at first, some of the men kind of blend together, and it takes little time to keep straight who is who. Once on the island, the eight guests and two servants wait for their host, who never shows up. Completely cut off from the mainland, they grow restless until one of them dies. When another dies, it can be no mere coincidence, and they realize that one amongst them must be a killer. The rest of the book plays this cat and mouse game all the way out, leaving the reader guessing until the very end. Because of the number of characters, there's not a whole lot of depth to any of them, but the story is obviously plot-driven as opposed to character-driven, so that should come as no surprise. It's an incredibly elaborate (and thus slightly contrived) web that is woven, but great fun, especially in bleak, stormy weather!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, 14 April 2010
By 
H. Barnett (Oxford, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Ok, first things first, I love Agatha Christie.
I literally can't get enough of her novels (specifically that wonderful little Belgian)
So when I say this quite simply trumps them all (yes, even Poirot's finest) you get an idea of just how incredible this book is.
It is, in my mind, the perfect set up for a murder mystery: ten people trapped on an island being killed off one by one! Let the games begin!
The solution is beyond belief, but whats more, the journey itself is full of shock and awe and will keep you reading long after you intended to put it down to do other things.

My only grievance with this is that having read it already, I can never again experience its sense of overwhelming mystery and suspense with fresh, unknowing, eyes.
I will never again read a mystery novel that can surpass its sheer perfection, and that is the great sadness that comes hand in hand with the joy of this book.
Prepare yourself before reading, you are in for a treat.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some information, 20 Oct. 2011
I just received an e-mail from Harper Collins in which they announced that the publication of "and then there were none" in facsimile has been cancelled. So for all the Agatha Christie fans who were hoping to have the entire collection this is bad news:-(

Just thought that this information might be helpfull to some of you
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And then there was the facsimile edition... at long last, 9 Sept. 2013
By 
Kevin Gascoyne (Northampton, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
After many years of this facsimile edition being promised, then withdrawn, it has finally been published by Harper Collins with a mixed US and UK facsimile of the original dust jacket, the front cover being the original 1940 US version. Whilst I would have liked a version with the original 1939 UK dust jacket, just to complete my collection, this was never going to happen due to the original UK title (Ten Little N*****s) being too controversial. Having said that, the cover for this version is beautifully reproduced and looks stunning.

The book itself has always been one of my favourites, with a cracking story involving ten strangers, invited by the mysterious U. N Owen to either holiday, visit or work at a mansion on the remote Soldier Island, off the Devon coast. Each of the visitors has a deadly secret... murder! Then their pasts finally catch up with them as a serial killer strikes and, one by one, ten become nine, then eight, then seven.... Just who is the killer in their midst and who will be the next victim???

The one main difference in this book is the renaming of the island and the classic children's rhyme; my paperback copy of the book was printed in 1990, and the island was called, even in those enlightened times, N****r Island. Someone has clearly gone through this edition with a fine toothed comb to ensure that no reader, however broadminded, is offended by politically incorrect language or sentiment.

If you are a fan of Agatha Christie, then you've either already read And Then There Were None or know what to expect; but, if you are new to Agatha Christie, then this would be a cracking way to start reading her classic murder mystery novels and short stories.

Either way, enjoy.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding thriller writing, 4 Jan. 2011
'And Then There Were None' is an outstanding example both of a closed-circle crime, of Christie's use of nursery rhymes to plot a story and of the stories featuring neither Hercule Poirot nor Miss Marple. It is one of her best-known stories with a stunningly original plot and motivation for the crimes committed.

Ten people from various social backgrounds are lured to a mansion on an island off the Devon coast and killed off one-by-one. Each one dies in a manner related to the appropriate verse of the nursery rhyme which hangs over the fireplace in every bedroom in the mansion.

The story includes varied and believable characters, an island setting based on Burgh Island off the South Devon coast and an increasingly claustrophobic suspense generated as the action moves towards its climax.

Christie is not generally thought of as a thriller writer but this story really does prove that she could write a real thriller as well as the more conventional detective story. Christie herself went on record as being very pleased with the end product, especially since it was, in her words, extremely difficult to plan.

One of her best and a must for a crime fiction collection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Agatha Christie is known as the Queen of Mystery, 25 April 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The setup is delicious: ten strangers are lured to an island on the promise of various things, employment, fun, etc. only to find that the hosts are not there and that the large, empty house only contains the guests and a couple of servants. After dinner on the first night, a recorded voice on a record player proclaims each one of them a murderer who has escaped their crimes - but no more! And then people start dying, one by one...

I've never read an Agatha Christie novel before, thinking that they would be corny or somehow like another popular writer whose work I disliked, Ellis Peters, but I was very, very wrong. This book was published in 1939 and is labelled "thriller" and yet 80+ years later I can attest to it remaining a thrilling read.

The elements of the story: that the guests have no way of leaving the island; that they slowly realise that one of them is the deranged killer with a warped sense of justice; the nursery rhyme which tells them how they're going to die but not the order - it's all so masterfully plotted by Christie, I was barrelling through the book, devouring the chapters eager to see who would survive, who was the killer, and why.

What's also surprising is the overarching sense of dread you have when reading. I read it at night, alone, with the rain pounding the windows and I found myself more terrified reading this than I'd been in years. This isn't just an amazing thriller, it's a truly scary horror novel too. As the number of guests dwindle, the claustrophobic atmosphere is palpable and the paranoia ramped up to such an extent that you can't help but keep reading at a ever-increasing pace until the final page.

The only real critique I have is the way the final guest snuffs it, before the big reveal. It seemed a bit contrived. But I suppose it was possible for it to happen that way... a long shot, but possible.

This is one of the finest mystery thrillers I've ever read which still manages to have an enormous pull on the reader decades after being published, an astonishing feat in itself. I wish I hadn't waited so long to read a Christie novel, this one was so good. I'll definitely read more and highly recommend this to all fans of great fiction.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And then there were few better than this., 24 Dec. 2004
By 
John Austin "austinjr@bigpond.net.au" (Kangaroo Ground, Australia) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Surely everyone in the world has read this book by now! Surely it tops the best-selling list of a best-selling author! Older readers may not recognize it by its current title, its original and a later replacement having been deemed too racist. Nothing racist, I hope, was picked in my school English classes, where I used it to help develop pupils' appetite for reading.
Agatha Christie's achievement is remarkable. She creates ten characters, all suspected of murder, who are lured to an island. She has them meet their deaths one by one as nominated in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians" which is displayed in their rooms. She has each murder occur in a situation where almost all the other island guests might have had opportunity to commit it. As if devising all this were not enough, she also frequently takes us into the minds of the various characters - something that the whole nature of detective fiction usually prohibits. This construction is not only intricate but also compact; it is one of her shorter novels. Built on this scheme, the book must exclude Mrs Christie's regular sleuths, Poirot and Miss Marple. Instead, the dwindling number of island guests generate their own investigation.
So here is a book that offers double the pleasure that murder mysteries provide. As well as challenging you to solve the mystery, it also amazes you that so ingenious a mystery could be contrived.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely un-put-downable!, 20 Aug. 2002
By A Customer
A group of people find themselves invited to an island off the English coast. Their host is not present and a storm is fast approaching. After two people die, the guests quickly realise that what seemed like two accidents in succession is in fact the work of a killer on the island. I found this to be one of the most enjoyable and genuinely chilling mysteries I have ever read. Christie's handling of the narrative and the suspense scenes is nothing short of masterly, and she manages to conjure up an amazingly tense atmosphere. Thoroughly engrossing and beautifully written, this classic novel will leave you guessing literally until the end.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars And Then There Was The Best Murder Mystery Story Ever !!, 6 Feb. 2007
By 
Having been an avid Miss Marple and Poirot follower I was reluctant to read any Agatha Christie novel that did not 'star' the ingenius detectives. I decided to pick up this book on a car boot sale - not expecting to enjoy it. BUT HOW WRONG WAS I ???!!!

THIS BOOK IS AN ABSOLUTE MASTERPIECE ! The plot is incredibly simple, based around a childrens nursery rhyme, on a deserted island off the coast of England. There are no distractions to the story, the characters are credible and the way the deaths are strung together is perfection itself !! The usual twists, turns and surprise ending are evident here - but this one is a complete original ! Totally unpredictable !

This really is my favourite book !I have converted all of my friends and family over to Agatha Christie by introducing them to this book. How I wish I could forget the conclusion, however, so that I may read this book time and time again !?

No other Agatha Christie - in my mind - can compare. Move over Marple & Poirot........
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Whodunnit Of All Time, 17 July 2006
By 
Mr. D. J. Read (Alnwick, Northumberland United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
The title says it all. Agatha Christie is THE greatest writer, and this is her greatest book of all. If ever I could recommend a book to bring a reader into the crime genre, this would be it.

I wont go into the story, as many have already done that for me, suffice to say that, improbable as the story sounds, it is utterly baffling, and yet, when the truth comes out, the true genius is revealed.

But it is not just the sheer genius of the story. As a crime novel, this work holds something else, a dark, sinister, brooding atmosphere, as people begin to expire. We are treated to some internal reflections of the characters, though we have no idea from whom the musings come.

Another factor is the way she writes, so simply, with such simple descriptions as to encourage our own mental image, so each will have their own picture of the scenes. This allows one to consume this marvellous novel in a single sitting, and yet, also you do not want it to end, even as the death toll rises. Everything is perfect, characters, setting, those teasing clues, and a truly twisted villain, as the end will reveal.
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And Then There Were None
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie (Mass Market Paperback - 29 Mar. 2011)
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