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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superior to the Robinson Nag Hammadi
The Nag Hammadi Library in English edited by Robinson seems to be the standard translated edition of the texts, certainly in terms of best selling, but I would recommend this current book (or else Bentley Layton's "The Gnostic Scriptures") over that one.

It contains more than just Nag Hammadi material, including documents from the Berlin Codex (Gospel of Mary)...
Published on 10 Feb 2011 by E. L. Wisty

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Far too much political idealogy within the translations to make this a singularly trustworthy work
This is a book of English translations of the Nag Hammadi texts, but there are a number of problems with the overall book.
The first is to do with the objectivity in the translations. Translation is a difficult art and can be very open to subtle biases of the translator. Too often one person gives the translation. There did not seem to be care to have translations...
Published 1 month ago by Openhearts


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5.0 out of 5 stars unbelievable knowledge, 6 May 2014
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
worthwhile studying , to the serious student this contains great knowledge.we are lucky to still have this information seen that the Christians destroyed all gnostic beliefs including the great library of Alexandria
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5.0 out of 5 stars Astounding, 6 May 2014
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A real piece of history becomes alive in these texts and the šetailed explainations are very useful. Whatever Christians think today about their faith should informed by these ancient thoughts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Books., 14 April 2014
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Speedy delivery, arrived In excellent condition, also product was as advertised. Would purchase again from this source again. Very happy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars long term study, 2 Oct 2013
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
fascinating but quite intense I will need to look at this over and over to fully appreciate the subtleties of this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nag Hammadi, 6 Sep 2013
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T. Canavan (Stourport on Severn, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
Clear, concise and easy to understand. Gives another view of Jesus and God which makes one appreciate the spiritual realm where they dwell even more.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Far too much political idealogy within the translations to make this a singularly trustworthy work, 26 May 2014
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
This is a book of English translations of the Nag Hammadi texts, but there are a number of problems with the overall book.
The first is to do with the objectivity in the translations. Translation is a difficult art and can be very open to subtle biases of the translator. Too often one person gives the translation. There did not seem to be care to have translations checked for accuracy and conforming to a standard. This may not bother some readers who wish only to get a gist of what was written, but it means it permits preferences or enforced meanings into passages which frankly have parts of sentences missing.There is too much guess work for critics to be sure the passages are translations and not interpretations.
Second one is to do with the coaching of the reader to think a particular way: mainly that these are all scriptures like the New Testament. The Nag Hammadi writings are a bunch of unconnected texts, quite often contradicting with each-other (and that is reading them in their contexts). The New Testament is centred firmly on the character of Jesus Christ and what His death and resurrection meant. This is not what these texts are about.
Third, there is no reason to assume any of these texts originated before the mid second century, and these are third and fourth century parchments, with sometimes containing some parts of some verses from the Holy Bible, but mostly filled up with Gnostic ideas. Yet the commentators try to pass them off authentic.
Fourth, commentators fail to perceive direct mistakes in these Gnostic speeches with Christian teaching. This is why they have always been rejected by the Church and even have statements like "everything was made for the sake of James" who was the brother of Jesus. Where in the Bible does it say this? Christians worship Jesus and it says quite explicitly everything was made for Him (Colossians 1.16) . So why not state this as a non-Christian text?
The funniest thing is to do with the respect given to the gospel of Thomas! Apparently, Thomas was the twin of Jesus: 'you are my twin' says Jesus to Thomas! Wow! So Mary got pregnant and had twins! Didn't anybody else notice? Well, apparently no other Nag Hammadi writer did, nor anyone in the whole of Christian literature which has Thomas saying "My Lord and My God" to Jesus. Yet, the commentators do not mention this obvious discrepancy with Christian teaching but insist it was written by Thomas himself who is given three names Didymus Thomas and Judas! This is not in the Bible either, and I do not know of any other Jew of the fist century who had three names.
When historians find forgeries they say they are forgeries, but the commentators refuse to do this.
Finally, The Gnostics in third century Greek speaking Egypt did not much about Jewish beliefs because nothing in the Nag Hammadi shows they did. Nothing on the temple layout, temple worship, the method of the sacrifices, nor even Yahweh was the Lord God of the Old Testament, nor Jesus' claim to be God's Son and uniquely equal to Him. Why do the commentators not remark on these either? It leaves the impression the commentators seem as much ignorant of basic Christian beliefs as the Nag Hammadi writers were.
But on the positive side ignore the comments and political correct statements like 'child of humanity' rather than 'Son of Man' and some gist can be made of the original texts like a summary overview of what the texts contained.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hard to understand if your not a scolar, 11 July 2013
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
I really wanted to get a grip as to what was left out of the early bible's, and this book really helped with that. My frustration (and it's not the writers fault) is that because the scrolls were so worn and old, there are massive chunks missing from the text, and you have to fill in the gaps for yourself. That aside this is one of the best translations you will find anywhere, and the price is a steal...
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars seems okay, 6 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
The book was delivered quickly and there haven't been any problems. I haven't read it as such, as I have bought it to refer to during the reading of 'Not in his Image' by John Lash.
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1 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Christmas Present to myself, 5 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Nag Hammadi Scriptures: The Revised and Updated Translation of Sacred Gnostic Texts Complete in One Volume (Paperback)
I have all of the individual Gnostic Gospels and I purchased this to get another viewpoint and translation. I have not had time to read it yet.
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