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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating new perspective on ancient warfare
This third entry in the Earth Chronicles series contains some of Sitchin's most interesting theories as to the history of mankind. Building upon his reconstruction of ancient history as espoused in the previous two books, the author now sets out to describe the evolution on warfare on earth. First, he restates his earlier theories which, in a nutshell, is that the...
Published on 20 Jan 2003 by Daniel Jolley

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3.0 out of 5 stars 12th Planet Repeated
You can probably tell by now from my reviews that I was pretty much addicted to this never-ending series. :)

Same formula as the 12th Planet with much of the material revamped. If you have read the first in the series then you are not going to be surprised with any new revelations in this one.
Published 4 months ago by Dr. Gary D. Gorton


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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating new perspective on ancient warfare, 20 Jan 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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This third entry in the Earth Chronicles series contains some of Sitchin's most interesting theories as to the history of mankind. Building upon his reconstruction of ancient history as espoused in the previous two books, the author now sets out to describe the evolution on warfare on earth. First, he restates his earlier theories which, in a nutshell, is that the Anunnaki, inhabitants of a 10th planet now on the far side of our sun, came to earth millennia ago and eventually created modern man by means of genetic manipulation. These "gods" were anything but divine, constantly fighting amongst themselves for power and prestige. Inevitably, the warring gods turned to man as new instruments of warfare against their enemies. Men such as Sargon the Great were granted kingship in Mesopotamia and surrounding areas and encouraged to wage war on whomever their gods commanded them to fight. With gods often fighting alongside men, brandishing powerful weapons of destruction, warfare became a common, increasingly destructive way of life.
Sitchin presents some eye-raising theories in these pages which bear mentioning. First, he virtually rewrites the history of the pyramids of Giza in terms of the construction and usage of the monuments, the sentence of a god to imprisonment in the Great Pyramid, and new thoughts on the real purposes behind the baffling shafts, rooms, and plugs found therein. Part of Sitchin's argument about the creation of the pyramids revolves around mathematics, and this part of the book does temporarily bog the reader down a bit. Next, he identifies Abraham of the Bible as the noble son of a Sumerian priest and not a Semite at all; more incredibly, he argues that the real purpose of Abraham's ordained trip to Canaan was to stop an invading army of eastern kings from capturing the Anunnaki control center and spaceport in the Sinai peninsula. Finally, Sitchin argues that Sodom and Gomorrah, as well as the Sinai space port, were actually destroyed by nuclear weapons and that the tragic disappearance of the ancient Sumerians is to be explained by the radioactive fallout of the explosions drifting over the area.
True or not, Sitchin's theories are fascinating. His ideas are not his own, they are his interpretation of the ancient writings of the Sumerians, Egyptians, Israelites, and succeeding thinkers and historians. While many would condemn Sitchin for challenging the truth of the Bible, he actually helps support the history of that document--much of the information he has discovered from Sumerian, Akkadian, Egyptian, and other ancient sources actually matches remarkably well the facts presented in the Bible. Of course, one is hard pressed to trust Sitchin's data implicitly (unless one can translate diverse ancient writings), but he does succeed in presenting a unified, linear chronology of events. Whether his interpretation is correct or not, it does serve to explain a number of unsolved mysteries from man's past and makes for fascinating reading.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A SUPER READ FOR THOSE WITH OPEN MINDS, 12 Feb 1999
By A Customer
Like ALL of his books, this one too is amazing, compelling, persuasive, enlightening, builds rationally and logically to each of its points BUT (there's alway a "but")is a bit difficult to read. Also, as with ALL his books, Zecharia draws his concise conclusions by bringing the knowledge of many sciences together. It is a must read for anyone with an open mind and thirst for knowledge.
I suggest the Earth Chronicles be read in their order of publication: 12th Planet, Stairway to Heaven, Wars of Gods & Men, Lost Realms,When Time Began.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mummies? We don't got to show no stinking mummies!, 1 July 1998
By A Customer
Sitchin brings myth and reality into synchrony in this exciting and credible history of Old Testament times. You'll never again accept the hogwash that the Giza pyramids were the burial places of (or even built by!) Egyptian pharoahs. And his explanation of the demise of Sumer sheds a bright light on the origins of the Hebrews and other biblical tales. Wide-ranging and meticulously documented, like all the "Earth Chronicles". Sitchin is able to combine brilliant and thoroughly supported scholarship with a story-teller's grace and timing, while resisting the temptation to embellish the truth as he sees it. I recommend you read the "Twelfth Planet" and "Stairway to Heaven" first.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of the Sitchin's Earth Chronicles Series, 26 Sep 1998
By A Customer
I've now read ALL of Sitchin's Earth Chronicles series, starting with 12th Planet, and have decided that this is the best of the lot! Especially if you're into the mysteries of the Giza pyramids. Not that I would recommend anyone START with it without reading the others preceeding it in the series as they would be at a great loss for background. To do that would leave one with many doubts on where he is coming from and how he has derived a lot of things assumed in this part. I feel that this one is the high-point of the set, giving readers progressing through the series, something to look forward to if they are already bored with the first books in the series.
As always, Mr Sitchin, supports every step of his postulations with multi-sourced, cross-referenced, generally irrefutable evidence from uncorrupted ancient sources. He clearly states when he is making a personal assumption or conjecture, which is not often. Personally, I find his habit (present in most of his works) of misleading the reader temporarily, by following the traditional reasoning process, only to later refute it and explain the truth via his version, somewhat frustrating.
Time-wise, he begins, in this segment, with the earliest recorded times on earth, right up to practically thru the old testament. You'll find out what the Pyramids were used for, who built them, why they were closed off and even who was imprisioned in them. He even gets into who the biblical Abraham really was.
Again, prepare by reading the first two FIRST, but don't miss this one to tie everything together!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book, 8 Feb 1999
By A Customer
Although I must admit that Zecharia Sitchin has lost a lot of credibility in the last few years with his last two books "The Cosmic Code" and that other one about the emissaries of the gods, this book still offers a valid theory about our origins and the forgotten history about mankind. He brings forth evidence that has been dismissed as pure myth by the experts and sheds new light on ancient ageless mysteries. Please note that these other "experts" have never even once debated with Sitchin, except perhaps about those two last books of his. The Wars of Gods and Men truly is his best books, and it will truly show you the origins of Giza, Baalbek, Jerusalem and other mysterious sites.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant as always, 18 Jun 2011
This review is from: The Wars of Gods and Men (Earth Chronicles) (Mass Market Paperback)
I am reading my through the Earth Chronicles and so far I have found them all well written and very interesting. I would suggest starting with The 12th Planet before you get onto this book purely because alot of the information ties up with the previous 2 books and probably wouldnt make too much sense without their input. I really have enjoyed reading Sitchins books and recommend them to anyone who has an interest in ancient civilisations, Intervention Theory and human origins. Give it a read its worthwhile
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3.0 out of 5 stars 12th Planet Repeated, 26 Mar 2014
By 
Dr. Gary D. Gorton (Timbuktu) - See all my reviews
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You can probably tell by now from my reviews that I was pretty much addicted to this never-ending series. :)

Same formula as the 12th Planet with much of the material revamped. If you have read the first in the series then you are not going to be surprised with any new revelations in this one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars makes you think, 10 Nov 2013
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i also read the 12th planet which was great but this is just fantastic gods or e t used nukes thousands of years ago
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5.0 out of 5 stars good book, 13 Dec 2012
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This review is from: The Wars of Gods and Men (Earth Chronicles) (Mass Market Paperback)
excellent value exactly as described pleasure to do business with this vendor would use again and recommend to other people
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4.0 out of 5 stars The best one yet, 20 Oct 2009
This review is from: The Wars of Gods and Men (Earth Chronicles) (Mass Market Paperback)
War and humankind have advanced hand in hand for millennia but is it instinct that causes the bloodlust in man or was it by design that man became a warrior ? Book three of the Earth chronicles explores the motivations behind mans inexorable slide towards destruction. Sitchin purports that although man was initially created as a worker, the Gods soon realised that he could be used as a pawn on the battlefields of Earth and so began an era where God and man fought side by side. Men died at the whim of the Gods whose petty squabbles and treachery created famine and misery.

This is probably the most interesting of the series so far and in it we learn of the incessant quarrelling between the Gods who seem to only concern themselves with personal gain regardless of the consequences. This almost always led to open warfare and Sitchin shows the painstaking research that has gone into recreating some of these epic battles. Horus, Seth,Zeus and Indra take centre stage at the beginning of the book while the evils of Marduk and Zu cement the previous viewpoints. The Gods have an insatiable lust for self indulgent behaviour and murder, rape and incest almost become the norm. " The prisoner in the Pyramid " is truly fascinating and provides some exceptional detective work and theories as to what the function of the Pyramids were and why they were abandoned. Abraham features heavily near the end of the book as both his genealogy and relationship with the Gods are explored in depth. The last chapter provides a horrible account of Nuclear Holocaust and again Sitchin shows his ability to interpret data in a unique and insightful manner creating many unanswerable questions.

I enjoyed this book it's presented in a very informative yet readable style and although some chapters can be heavy going and appear abstruse it is well worth persevering with the read.
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The Wars of Gods and Men (Earth Chronicles)
The Wars of Gods and Men (Earth Chronicles) by Zecharia Sitchin (Mass Market Paperback - 1 April 2007)
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