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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read
So there's another planet in our solar system on a much larger elliptical orbit, but it's there and it passes by us every few thousand years. These aliens created man as a worker ant to mine the planet and bleed us dry of our natural resources. This sounds way too far fetched when said bluntly but with further exposure to Sitchin's theories it becomes well somewhat...
Published on 23 Jun 2009 by Foxylock

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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the twelfth planet
I'm not sure I believe everything in this book, and it is hard going sometimes, he tends to repeat things. But I've always been interested in the idea of a previous civilisation with advanced technology and there does seem to be some evidence that ancient people knew more than realisticly they should have known. Look at the pyramids of Giza and the temples in South...
Published on 18 May 2009 by Y. J. Fielding


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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read, 23 Jun 2009
So there's another planet in our solar system on a much larger elliptical orbit, but it's there and it passes by us every few thousand years. These aliens created man as a worker ant to mine the planet and bleed us dry of our natural resources. This sounds way too far fetched when said bluntly but with further exposure to Sitchin's theories it becomes well somewhat plausible. How did the Sumerians know so much about astronomy and why do ancient clay tablets and sculptures seem to depict highly advanced flying equipment. Do the stories of the ancient Gods actually stem from real events. And what about the Bible, Adam and eve, The flood and all those epic stories ? Do we want the truth ?

I thought this book dragged its heels a little at the start owing to the sheer depth of information that had to be conveyed to the reader. The theories are intriguing and the allure of what's to come is a tantalising quest for more information. This has me confused yet deeply interested and although the Earth chronicles is a major undertaking, to leave it unread would be a shame.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In his time, they said Galileo was crazy, too!, 17 Jun 1997
By A Customer
The 12th Planet is among the most intriguing, thought provoking books recently written. While in past decades I'd barely given notice to Von Danikken and Velikovsky, Sitchin captured my attention and imagination from the start. His theories appear to have a wealth of leads originating across the sciences; from archeology and astronomy through genetics and geology to zoology and zoomorphism. However, many critics have deplored the sketchiness of his seemingly profuse documentation.

Isolated, many facets of the evidence are tenuous and easy to dismiss, but the depth and scope of the sum total will cause any critical (yet open) mind to ponder with wonder. You need not take it all seriously to enjoy the read, just imagine the possibilities.

And to the reader who labeled Sitchin as "nuts", please tell us how Sitchin (if as he claimed), using ancient archeological and textual evidence, predicted findings of the Voyager planet flybys in contradiction to modern "expert" opinions?
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114 of 125 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A provocative new theory of man's history, 30 Nov 2002
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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This is the first book in Sitchin's monumental Earth Chronicles series. It is important to remember that fact because there is necessarily a lot of introductory material to be presented here in order to lay the foundation for what is to come. In other words, most of the really interesting stuff comes later in the series--Ancient Egypt, MesoAmerica, etc. Parts of this first book are somewhat dry and hard to get through. As one gets into the latter half, though, some pretty amazing arguments are made. If you read this book and no other, you may well have a hard time even sanctioning the kinds of ideas Sitchen presents, let alone believing them. When you read the rest of the series, though, the arguments are threshed out much more thoroughly and should at least lend an idea of possiblity to objective readers.
The idea that "ancient astronauts" (a term I dislike) had a hand in Man's creation and evolution is not new. Sitchin goes far beyond the normal arguments, however. He argues that there is an undiscovered planet in our own solar system upon which life developed and evolved millions of years before life on earth, a planet that seeded earth with its earliest life forms millions of years ago when this undiscovered planet entered our solar system and essentially crashed into a large planet between Mars and Jupiter--the planet in question was broken up into two parts, one eventually forming Earth and the other the asteroid belt. The 12th planet (counting the sun and moon as planets) he calls Nibiru; it is a planet with an eccentric orbit carrying it well past the other nine planets thousands of years at a time. Here life developed and advanced at a very early period. Needing resources, particularly gold, the planet sent forth emissaries to earth. In order to free themselves of the hard labor of mining, these aliens, the Nefilim, created Man by combining their genes with those of the ape men then on earth, a procedure made possible by the fact that the two races were in fact genetic cousins. Thus, the Nefilim became early man's gods, and their stories were told in the artifacts of the ancient Sumerians and of the kingdoms that came after them.
Sitchin makes a determined effort to tie Christianity and the Bible to the tale he unfolds. He effectively, and with good evidence, shows that the early stories in the Bible are based largely on older manuscripts from Sumeria. He explains many of the mysterious passages in the Bible by tying the stories to more complete Sumerian tales--the Elohim, the plural Deity mentioned in the Creation story, the great flood, the Tower of Babel, and others. In this endeavor, he is very successful. While one may not be convinced of his story of life on Earth, one cannot doubt the fact that the early books of the Bible are basically a condensed version of former manuscripts. He makes a convincing argument for his theories, but one will not be and should not be convinced based on this one book. Much supporting evidence is to be found in the later books in the series, where a far richer version of man's history is presented by the author. As unbelievable as many of his ideas sound, Sitchin actually does an effective job of answering many of the big questions that scientists and theologians have been unable to answer about life on earth, the most important of which is an explanation of why home sapiens developed so suddenly and miraculously 300,000 years ago. Right or wrong, his ideas answer a lot of questions and deserve serious study. Sitchin's knowledge of ancient civilizations is immense, and his judgments cannot be dismissed without serious attention paid to them.
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42 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A New "Heads Up" for the Modern World, 27 Jun 1999
By A Customer
I first read the author's book nearly twenty years ago. I was heartily impressed by the scholarship, and it opened my eyes to the whole civilization that existed before Biblical times. Grand! I spent the next twenty years pursuing various pathways to "flesh-out" my views on his extraterrestrial conclusions (which should be kept separate from his in-depth evidence that "something odd" went on about that time). Very few other books have galvanized not only my attention but my sustained action. Highly recommended, though keep the evidence compartmentalized from the conclusions.
What Mr. Sitchin details is a group of beings that have a "superset" of abilities to our own, at least as of many thousands of years ago. The author seems to restrict these beings to being merely of advanced technology, but purely physical. This leads directly to his extraterrestrial conclusions. Personally, I believe the situation is more mixed-dimensional than that.
Another charm of Mr. Sitchin's book is that it invites us to view the world from a "perhaps we are not the top of the food chain" perspective. For instance, the Tigris-Euphrates area is now effectively closed off from the mass of archeologists. It is this possibility, that they may in some way still be here (remember, they may be effectively immortal), that makes this book so highly influential. There is something that we as a species are not yet "getting," and Mr. Sitchin (among many other researchers) is laying a groundwork. Thanks.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sitchin presents a multitude of intriguing theories, 19 Sep 1997
By A Customer
While many of his suppositions are only loosly documented by evidence, he makes a compelling case for the origins of human civilization in ancient Sumer. This book is at the very least fascinating and thought provoking. The scholarship shown in his linguistic interpretations is first rate, (although his conclusions sometimes gloss over evidenciary inconsistencies). All in all an excellent read.
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38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Truth is in this book., 13 Jun 1999
By A Customer
I love how some of the reviewers of Sitchin's books think that they know more than he does. Yeah, maybe they took a couple college courses on Anthropology or Archaeology, and believed everything that their professor shoved down their throat. Sitchin is no novice. when this book came out in 76, he had already been studying ancient civilizations for 30 years. If I am not mistaken, he was one of the first scholars ever to be able to completely decipher the cunieform writing! How could the Sumerians,in 3800 B.C. and earlier, know of all the planets in our solar system that we know of, when our own civilization did not find Pluto until 1930? In the very same ancient texts that are talking about the characteristics of Pluto, they give characteristics of another planet, Nibiru. If Nibiru is nothing but a myth, why would the ancient people incorporate it into every text refering to our solar system, along with the planets known to us today? If you have an open mind on how modern man came to be, then I would highly recomend reading the 12th Planet or any of Zecharia Sitchin's books.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The essencial report about our hidden past, 28 Jan 2000
By 
Truly hard work, large and multidisciplinar knowledge - and some rare skills - are the roots of Mr. Sitchin quest on our almost lost primi-historical dangerous ground. For the sake of truth and fully understanding our real origins, his "Earth Chronicles" - wich "The 12th Planet" inaugurates - are of the most valuable help. I hope the young generations can find, at last, some more clear and fair answers about "Who are we" and "Who created us, besides the usual enygmas. The astonishing tale of the extraterrestrial intervention, now supported by many archeological findings all over the world, emerges as a very functional hipothesis for the new historical science, with the due revision and more acurate translation and re-interpretation of the ancient texts and religious documents overhaul by Mr. Sitchin with clean and clever eyes. The cogent statements, connections and findings on the most of Zecharia Sitchin's work deserve our best reading and open minded audience. An entirely new "big picture" can be drawn, step by step, from the dawn of our History. One can find, of course, some questionnable views on such a difficult and interdisciplinar field of investigation - the stake is high. But, in the very end, I think the volume and nature of Mr. Sithin's work really deserves, to say it all, the Nobel prize.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars First Sitchin experience, 19 Oct 2012
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This review is from: Twelfth Planet (Earth Chronicles): 1 (Mass Market Paperback)
I have just finished reading this first part of seven part series.
Indeed the content is thought provoking and convincingly written. The persuasion for Mr Sitchin's works are seemingly carefully selected. The illustrations to support his theory are all hand sketches - I was slightly disappointed that these were not actual photographs of the actual artefacts referred to in the text. I felt, that this depreciated his argument tangibly.
The beginning of the book was very interesting and read as, on the most part, quite factual.
You will find some very interesting theories behind how our solar system today formed it's modern structure (I won't give too much away).
What you will find whilst reading through the 422 pages of this theoretical works is that it indeed tends to begin quite feasibly and wavers ever so closely to the far fetched and bizarre! Progressively unsupported by definite source of reference and tends to draw from former conclusions made previously in the book by the author himself.

However, this book is undeniably fascinating and stipulates a very much alternative view on the origins of man. Indeed he almost convinces the reader that his work is factual - every last line!
Excellently written and I have ambitions to obtain the complete series (Earth chronicles).

I would definitely recommend this to the open minded.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars the twelfth planet, 18 May 2009
By 
Y. J. Fielding (stockport, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Twelfth Planet (Earth Chronicles): 1 (Mass Market Paperback)
I'm not sure I believe everything in this book, and it is hard going sometimes, he tends to repeat things. But I've always been interested in the idea of a previous civilisation with advanced technology and there does seem to be some evidence that ancient people knew more than realisticly they should have known. Look at the pyramids of Giza and the temples in South America and even Stonehenge. I have read a lot of books about this and although I am sceptic I do believe something strange happened in the past that we haven't explained yet.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It explains such a lot!, 28 Feb 2007
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I've just finished reading the first in the Earth Chronicles series, and - as someone who's always loved ancient history - it seems to make such a lot of sense.

Why did, for over a million years, our 'ancestors' just use a simple stone as a tool, then it took another million for them to learn how to 'chip away' at the stone and shape it. Then, approximately 23,000 years ago, we learned how to make tools out of all kinds of material, build stupendous temples and temple-like structures and learned farming ad animal husbandry and we now keep sending up satelittles into space - and why are we so vastly different to our nearest cousins, the chimpanzees, when according to all evolutionary theories, we should still be knuckle walking and living in the African savannahs, even if we have lost most of our body hair.

Something doesn't smell right in the halls of science and I'd like to thank Mr Sitchin for bringing many of these same points to the publics attention, when academia is so obviously determined to dig a bit hole and hide all the evidence in it.

Good read.
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Twelfth Planet (Earth Chronicles): 1
Twelfth Planet (Earth Chronicles): 1 by Zechar Sitchin (Mass Market Paperback - 1 April 2007)
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