Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Godly Society
This is one of a very select group of books, those I have read twice. How Puritan society was structured in 17th century New England. Innovative people, the Puritans, who introduced civil marriage and legal divorce. Teenagers were sent to other families for discipline through the difficult years. Morgan's big criticism is that the Puritans only really evangelised in the...
Published on 24 Aug 2005 by G. J. Weeks

versus
0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It portrays them poorly. my brother Hezikia is upset.
i personly along with my puritan brothers and sisters am disturbed by the falseness in this book. we do not live as it is printed. my ancesters did not either. i wish we would stop being judged in this matter. we are tired of the jokes and it hurts our feelings.
Published on 8 Dec 1998


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Godly Society, 24 Aug 2005
By 
G. J. Weeks (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-century New England (Torchbooks) (Paperback)
This is one of a very select group of books, those I have read twice. How Puritan society was structured in 17th century New England. Innovative people, the Puritans, who introduced civil marriage and legal divorce. Teenagers were sent to other families for discipline through the difficult years. Morgan's big criticism is that the Puritans only really evangelised in the family and tried to breed a covenant people. A valuable work describing how godly people sought to construct a godly society.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Is the term "Puritan" misused by most of us?, 10 Aug 2011
By 
Mum Betty (Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-century New England (Torchbooks) (Paperback)
We have a view of the "Puritan" as godly self-satisfied prude, unbending, tight-laced. Morgan's chapters on aspects of the Puritan family are a very useful antidote to the many misconceptions most of us harbour about the Puritans and their experiment. The book is divided into seven chapters: Puritanism and Society; Husband and Wife; Parents and Children; The Education of a Saint; Masters and Servants; the Family in the Social Order; and Puritan Tribalism. As is so common with history, the truth is always more complicated than the myths we are often fed and accept with little question. The true Puritan was rarely self-satisfied; his or her religious conviction was based on alternating states of assurance and deepest doubt. Though they tried to direct their every action towards godliness, they were themselves all to aware of the difficulties put in the way of perfection that are posed by life. Much of their religious belief and the ways in which they organised their private, religious and civic life centred on their beliefs about the family, writ large onto society and religion. Morgan draws deeply upon diaries (evidently many Puritans kept them to keep track of and meditate upon their daily thoughts and sins of omission and commission), letters, court records, sermons and even business transactions to tease out not only their views and beliefs, but also how they acted within the constraints of those views and beliefs.

The only reason I did not award this five stars is that this is a book the reader has to want to read, and a subject he/she has to want to know about, for the book to come alive. But if you want to know about the subject, then this is the book to read. It's not long, but it is comprehensive.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It portrays them poorly. my brother Hezikia is upset., 8 Dec 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-century New England (Torchbooks) (Paperback)
i personly along with my puritan brothers and sisters am disturbed by the falseness in this book. we do not live as it is printed. my ancesters did not either. i wish we would stop being judged in this matter. we are tired of the jokes and it hurts our feelings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa9655330)

This product

The Puritan Family: Religion and Domestic Relations in Seventeenth-century New England (Torchbooks)
Used & New from: 0.04
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews