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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 8 January 2010
Neil Gaiman takes over the reigns of Miracleman, in his first foray into comics. He takes the series in a bold new direction, showing the brave new world from the perspective of everyday people who are now living a life that their ancestors couldn't even have conceived of in their wildest dreams. That Moore & Gaiman have conceived it & fleshed it out is powerful testament to their creative abilities.

In The Golden Age we meet normal schoolchildren whose classes include sex education ("but our parents had sex education", "not with actual sex they didn't"); the complex feelings of people trying to enjoy utopia despite losing loved ones to Bates; a woman who is more emotionally dependent on her superhuman infant daughter than the girl is on her; Andy Warhol, brought back to life in an artificial body & living in a literal underworld, along with 18 other duplicates of himself - and one of Dr. Gargunza.

It's a work of great daring & piercing subtlety. This may upset the purists but as much as I loved Alan Moore's run, in my view he's the Christopher Eccleston to Gaiman's David Tennant - a tough act to follow but Gaiman's ability to work new mythologies means he surpasses his predecessor in my view.

The image of Winter building a snowman while Miracleman fashions Olympus is perhaps a hint of what would have been to come in the next 2 volumes which Gaiman had planned to write - The Silver Age & the ominously titled Dark Age. Sadly, only the first 2 issues of The Silver Age were published but after decades of legal wrangling, Marvel Comics acquired the rights to Miracleman in 2009, so perhaps these volumes will soon be completed. Even if they aren't, the few copies of The Golden Age are simply breathtaking & definitely worth picking up.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 May 2014
I can see what Neil Gaiman was going for when he decided to focus these stories on the impact of the previous Miracleman arcs. To provide an in depth look at the repercussions, the shock wave, the effects on society. But in my opinion it was a cop out. Making the entire run about everyone and anyone but Miracleman was an acknowledgement that Gaiman was terrified of having to follow up on Moore's achievement. And instead of tackling that fear head on he shied away from it. Really disappointing. The stories have some merit, but for the insight they provide they run far too long. They would have made excellent tangents in a book about Miracleman, but as the main course they failed to satisfy.
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