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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sheer delight!
The young narrator, Shed is a bisexual half Indian boy who lives Out-In-The-Shed (hence his name) of a whorehouse owned by Ida Richilieu in Excellent, a very small town in Idaho at the beginning of the twentieth century. Out in the shed he is much in demand as he provides relief for many male customers while he earns his keep doing chores for Ida. There are many...
Published on 6 Oct 2007 by Benjamin

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing
Our group didn’t like this author but I did, so I have read some of his other stuff. However, this book is different and I wasn’t so keen. In fact I got bored with it quite early on.

The author claims a particular style for this book: "Dangerous writing means putting a piece of yourself in a work, going to the 'sore spot,' and discussing taboo...
Published 3 months ago by Mr. D. P. Jay


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A sheer delight!, 6 Oct 2007
By 
Benjamin (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
The young narrator, Shed is a bisexual half Indian boy who lives Out-In-The-Shed (hence his name) of a whorehouse owned by Ida Richilieu in Excellent, a very small town in Idaho at the beginning of the twentieth century. Out in the shed he is much in demand as he provides relief for many male customers while he earns his keep doing chores for Ida. There are many uncertainties about Shed's origins and parents, se he sets off to find his true self, and his real name. On his way he meets Dellwood Barker and makes eventually contact with some Indians; he thinks he finds some answers, but there is more to come. When Shed returns to Excellent all goes well for a time back at Ida Richilieu's Indian Head Hotel, with Ida, Shed, Dellwood and Alma Hatch forming their own unique family, strength against the troublesome Mormons who are taking over the town, until disaster strikes and everything falls apart.

There are plenty of interesting and idiosyncratic characters populating the tale, and the colourful story moves from drama to tragedy, from harrowing events to very tender moments, all with plenty of humour. However the real pleasure is to be found in the narration itself, Shed's way of expressing himself is delightful: "what my ears heard was me yelling the loudest I'd heard my mouth yell . . .", "I just let my feet and legs go . . .they took me out into the clearing . . ." are typical of Shed's logical thinking, and his endearing way of expressing himself.

It is a very beautiful story, and very moving. Shed is an appealing character who loved those close to him, and especially Dellwood, the only man he ever truly loved. It is a story about prejudice and dreams, about survival against adversity. The final pages are particularly heart rending as everything about Shed's life disintegrates; yet there is also hope and a future.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The beginning of the dream, 6 Mar 2009
By 
Daniel Park "danielpark99" (West Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
At a time when the future is closing in on him like a fist, Shed revels in that golden moment when everything is possible - where a family can mean a group of "differents" united against the world in a small town of reprobates that gradually grows hostile and ultimately deserted.

There's a dreamlike quality here which exhudes a cosy sepia glow to each recollection. Even terror is related with an almost affectionate nostalgia.

Its cyclical form - visiting and revisting narratives and locations - returns in the natrual successor to this novel, Spanbauer's arguably even better "Now is the hour". I urge people to read both books, they are unashamedly glorious!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Talk about not judging a book by it's cover!, 3 Oct 2005
By 
D. Payne "coflowdave" (Teesside) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
This came highly recommended from a friend but from the cover I thought it was going to be a charming child/teen oriented romp through the wild west. How wrong I was! This is an incredible, at times harrowing journey alongside a character that I found myself empathising with and rooting for more than almost any other I've found in literature.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 28 Nov 2010
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
This book is a bit odd but extremely well written. I found it dark but could not put the book down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of my best books ever, 3 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
Perhaps the simplest way to describe this book is: Western meets Tantra. It is one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. The names and language used, the symmetry and poetry will linger long after you have closed the last page.
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2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 20 April 2014
By 
Mr. D. P. Jay (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
Our group didn’t like this author but I did, so I have read some of his other stuff. However, this book is different and I wasn’t so keen. In fact I got bored with it quite early on.

The author claims a particular style for this book: "Dangerous writing means putting a piece of yourself in a work, going to the 'sore spot,' and discussing taboo topics, particularly sex and violence. It means writing for yourself, a concept that in the literary world was thought to make you go broke. It means exposing yourself to the tiger, not physically, but mentally."

The childhood of the chief character is well described, not least by his spelling out all the big words that he is learning. The trouble is that he continues to d this in adulthood.

He experiences American white prejudice, having to ride on the top of a stagecoach rather than inside. His sexuality is mysterious and alluring to white men.

But did he really drink a pint of whiskey in one sitting?

For all that people think of ‘Red Indians’ being primitive, there is sound wisdom in reflections about sex, that it can be mechanical but that it’s better between two people whose stories combine and whose hearts beat as one.

The moralising Mormons are maybe a reference to the time this book was written when, as the author says in an interview, “when fundamental Christians were trying to make homosexuals into second-class citizens. It was an initiative called Measure Nine.”

The amputation scene was gruesome.
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5.0 out of 5 stars LOVE. So Beautiful, 14 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
The most beautiful book I have ever read. So moving. Such a strange and stunning narrative. Loved every word of it.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favorite stories, 31 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
I read "The Man Who Fell in Love With the Moon" in 1994. Since then, I have worn a path in the carpet to the "S" section of my local bookstore. When will Mr. Spanbauer write another? There is something compelling about his storytelling style that I have found nowhere else. In the absence of new Spanbauer, can anyone recommend another wonderful read?
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a pleasant surprise this one is., 16 Oct 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
My friend recommended Moon to me a couple of weeks ago and I have been living in its world on and off ever since. This book must have an underground following--I have never read anything like it...so liberating and spiritual...It calms me just to pick it up. I am almost finished with it...in the middle of all the sad stuff...and i am avoiding finishing it--always a sign that I really love a book.
I am going to try the "looking into the left eye" trick myself tonight. It should definitely be interesting on the streets of NYC, where so many people try above all to hide their souls.
I wish everyone who reads this book great joy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW..., 13 Jan 2009
This review is from: The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon (Paperback)
A wild, raunchy, terrible joyride of a story about growing up in the world and getting to know who you are, what you are.

This book is a treasure... So is 'Now is the Hour' by the same author!
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The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon
The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon by Tom Spanbauer (Paperback - 30 Sep 1992)
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