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101 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's All Too Much
George Harrison's 1968 stellar gem, "It's All Too Much" could be a description of sensory overload. "It's all too much for me to see...it's all too much for me to take..." describes the autism/Asperger's (a/A) experience.
If you are on the spectrum or know somebody who is, make this book your best friend. It does an exemplary job of...
Published on 25 Feb 2006 by BeatleBangs1964

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but confusing
While the premise of the book is good and there is a lot to learn from it, the author seems to stray from her areas of expertise sometimes and some sections read like an undergraduate essay which has been studiously researched, but the material not really understood. She seems to be blind to her apparent or real contradictions, which need explanation at the very least...
Published 3 months ago by pmcoates


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101 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's All Too Much, 25 Feb 2006
By 
BeatleBangs1964 (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
George Harrison's 1968 stellar gem, "It's All Too Much" could be a description of sensory overload. "It's all too much for me to see...it's all too much for me to take..." describes the autism/Asperger's (a/A) experience.
If you are on the spectrum or know somebody who is, make this book your best friend. It does an exemplary job of explaining strong reactions to sensory stimuli. For example, I knew a very young child with Asperger's who, from infancy on always checked toys to see if they were soft. Hard toys were discarded and the child also complained about certain tastes and foods that caused "funny-bad" feelings and "felt nasty in your mouth" such as "lumpy potatoes" and "nasty ketchup." She also detested the smells of talcum powder and vinegar, saying they "were stinky" and made her "feel like throwing up."
That same child insisted on keeping her hair back in a ponytail because she didn't like the way her hair felt touching her skin. Her idea of punishment and hell was being forced to forgo the ponytail and suffer having her "hair getting in the way and making my skin itch," as she said. She also refused to wear certain things due to the level of discomfort they caused; preferred loose, comfortable clothing and, like everyone on the spectrum detested loud noises and cowered under tables upon hearing sirens. The child explained at 3 that "sirens make me hurt everywhere" and "jello is nasty - it shakes in your mouth; doesn't taste much so why eat it?" To this day, she finds jello repulsive.
This book is the voice of hope and reason. The child mentioned above at the time of this review has two degrees and is an expert in certain areas, one of which is Asperger's Syndrome. Imagine how liberating it must be to learn that these strong feelings don't separate you from your fellow man, but rather creates a bond with countless others who share them!
For anybody on the spectrum and for those who know people who are, be sure to read this book!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars too loud to bright too fast too tight, 22 Jan 2012
This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
This is a fabulous book. It is well written and easy to read. It explains how we function and how difficult life can be for the sensory defensive person. I have found it very useful in gaining a better understanding of how our sensory system works which has enabled me to apply this to my work on sensory circuits in a primary school. I would highly recommend this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative, 8 May 2014
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This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
Great book, easy to follow & very informative. I do not often buy this type of book. The format was good except of course it's American. I also bought "the out of sync child" & preferred this one. The other book ad the same information mostly.
Paid £12 delivery for 4 books which took 3 weeks to deliver by snail!!!!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too brilliant, 15 Nov 2011
By 
S. D. Weston (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
I have bought at least six copies of this book and each time someone pinches it off me when they realise that it may have an answer for them. Reading this book was like reading a book that was written about me and after 30 years of trying to cope with how I felt, it was wonderful to have a book that explained how I felt. I have given it to my friends and family to read so that they can at least gain an understanding of what it is like to be a 'sensational' person.

Well written, empathetic and really useful.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but confusing, 5 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
While the premise of the book is good and there is a lot to learn from it, the author seems to stray from her areas of expertise sometimes and some sections read like an undergraduate essay which has been studiously researched, but the material not really understood. She seems to be blind to her apparent or real contradictions, which need explanation at the very least. Two examples:

On page 256-7 in the section on candida overgrowth she states that "to control yeast overgrowth ... we should eliminate ... dairy products" (amongst other things). This is patent nonsense, as quality dairy products (ie.organic and unpasteurised, but not limited to yoghurt) are fantastic for digestive health including promoting good gut flora, as she would know if she had researched the subject thoroughly enough. It is vital to young mammals that their guts are rapidly colonised by beneficial bacteria, so it is no surprise that their mothers' milk is loaded with them, making milk products the number one thing that people with gut disbiosis should consume to renormalise their gut flora. Anyone in any doubt should read "Gut and Psychology Syndrome" by Dr Natasha Campbell-McBride, or "Milk Diet as a Remedy for Chronic Diseases" by Charles Sanford Porter (both available on Amazon). The author evens alludes to this fact a few lines on when she contradicts herself and suggests eating yoghurt daily, as if a mother needs to stop and make yoghurt out of her milk before feeding it to her young in order for it to achieve the desired effect! It is as if she copied one sentence out of one (not very good) textbook and the other out of another! Yes, yoghurt (and especially Kefir, which the author has apparently not heard of at all) contain enhanced levels of beneficial microbial activity, but this is only a matter of degree, and unprocessed milk will have a similar beneficial effect if enough is consumed.

On page 258 we are told that the sensory defensive are likely to have an acid/alkali balance which is too acid. However in the next chapter, on breathing, we are told that they are likely to breathe poorly and be subject to hyperventilation without even knowing it. This, we are told, results in too much Carbon Dioxide being exhaled, resulting in an overly alkaline acid/alkali balance! It is quite possible, of course, that one person is too acid and another too alkaline, for different reasons, but you would have thought the apparent anomoly would have been mentioned. However, it gets better: this dearth of Carbon Dioxide in the blood, we are told on page 267-8, results in less oxygen being released to the tissues, causing dizziness and breathlessness, diminished blood flow to the brain causing headaches and lack of concentration etc etc. On the very next page however, we are encouraged to develop deep breathing habits because "when you breathe deeply, you blow off more Carbon Dioxide than you inhale, allowing more oxygen to get to the brain"! Now as any high school biology student will tell you, along with inhaling more oxygen than is exhaled, exhaling more Carbon Dioxide than is inhaled is fundamental to the biological process of respiration on which we rely constantly for utilizing energy. It is not a luxury enjoyed by those enlightened enough to employ certain breathing techniques, however beneficial they may be. However if we look beyond the inanity/nonsense of the statement as worded, the message it conveys is that it is always beneficial to increase the amount of Carbon Dioxide which we exhale. The author seems to have forgotten that a few paragraphs earlier she has told us that exhaling too much Carbon Dioxide is what happens when we hyperventilate, has negative effects and is to be avoided! If the author is this confused, what hope has the reader got? It is likely that the danger of exhaling too much Carbon Dioxide when deep breathing is mitigated by the increased Oxygen inhaled in the process, but the author doesn't see fit to explain this glaring anomoly, or why hyperventilating doesn't increase the oxygen intake in the same way. We are instead left with the message that we should avoid hyperventilating because it leads to too much Carbon Dioxide being exhaled, and instead utilize deep breathing because it increases the amount of Carbon Dioxide we exhale!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 16 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
This book explains sensory issues, which are often a misunderstood or unrecognised. An easy to read book explains the issues and ways to cope.
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5.0 out of 5 stars best kept secret, 6 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
This book is the best kept secret about how are bodies & mind learn from the inside out. The fact that most of it is now evidenced based allows you to see things in a different way and gives you tools to tackle challenging behaviors which can and must be supported by an OT. Wish I knew about this when I started helping others, esp kids. For me, a must read!
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading to understand yourself and others, 5 Jan 2012
This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
This book was written for me. So many things were explained in a simple way. It has brought about a profound change in the way that I treat myself and others; I am more tolerant.
Before reading this book, I was always slightly, and often, very angry with myself for all the fussiness and for behaving, my family teased 'like the princess and the pea' fairy story.
Now I feel tenderness towards myself and that is really a lovely improvement brought about because I now have an internal understanding of my behaviour. I have softened my attitude and developed more respect for myself.
I am now reading this book for the second time and it's even better because I am less shocked by what I read. I intend to buy copies for family and friends who I know can benefit from the practical steps. I will also recommend it to my students. Thank you so much for writing it - my level of daily 'alarms' has dropped substantially and I am more centered and happier.

If you ever lecture on this topic I'd be happy to share my sad and now victorious story.

jacqueline.purcell@yahoo.co.uk
University Lecturer
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 31 Aug 2014
This review is from: Too Loud Too Bright Too Fast Too Tight: What to Do If You are Sensory Defensive in an Overstimulating World (Paperback)
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