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on 6 October 2015
Really informative book, Ehrman at his best. It really explains the ways that biblical scholars try to unearth the early bible from later copies. Of course, the originals do not exist. Really fascinating stuff. Very clearly explained.
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on 13 July 2013
Not just a rehash of "the Orthodox Corruption of Scripture" in a more accessible form, this ranges much further and makes the processes of transmission of scripture transparent and the alterations wholly understandable.
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on 24 September 2013
Well written and an interesting read but it didn't tell me anything I didn't know already. It's worth reading for anyone who knows nothing about textual criticism as it is not an academic read per say.
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on 23 April 2015
A good history of how the New Testament came to be. Not anti-Christian at all just a lot of interesting observations on literary history. Only issue is it can be a little repetitive.
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on 28 January 2013
This book is about how some of the words of Scripture have been changed or removed over the centuries through scribal errors etc. Interesting book.
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on 9 May 2013
I would never have thought that the subject of textual analysis could have been made interesting, but Ehrman just about pulls this off. His enthusiasm for his subject, and his own way of turning it into a sort of detective puzzle is infectious, and he shows how this can be an important factor in the interpretation of the bible - particularly the New Testament. A very small change in the text can change the whole meaning of a sentence, whether done intentionally or not, and this can be carried over to thousands of subsequent copies. Only by painstakingly going back to the earliest known extant version is it possible to determine what might have been the original meaning.

However there are issues with the book: Ehrman tends to recycle many of his arguments with his various books, and readers will recognise here many arguments and sections that have already been published. There is some unnecessary repetition which can get a bit tedious and seems like padding. And lastly given the title, remarkably little has got to do with Jesus, so readers may feel a little bit cheated.

He has his detractors here and elsewhere, but it seems to me that his case has merit on reason - and it seems it was strong enough ultimately to lead to his losing his own faith as he could no longer believe in an inerrant bible. This rather dramatic volte face may have had to do with his fundamentalist beliefs in the first place being unable to deal with an unpleasant truth about the bible.
For me this is just one more nail in the coffin of the latter, and I think it is impossible to cling to this view in the age of reason anyway.

An interesting read certainly, much better than his detractors make out, but it has its faults and is not 100% reliable.
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on 2 June 2016
The book quality is beautiful but the front page was a little ripped but nothing of a big deal. Still great. Thanks
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on 13 September 2015
If you like your faith as it is - don't touch this book. If you're not afraid to put it to the test - try it.
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on 3 December 2007
Bart Ehrman is a biblical historian who posits that scribes' alterations to New Testament manuscripts reflect both human error and the influence of theology, culture, and politics. He explores the development of written scripture from the Greco-Roman era, the effect of inconsistencies on doctrine and later versions, and attempts to reconstruct original text. This was written with lay readers in mind rather than academics. And I would have rated it four stars if the author would stayed away from adding his own speculation. But it is a serious work that will open discussion on textual error again.
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on 17 April 2016
WARNING: if you're a Christian and you love your faith, do not buy this book.
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