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on 5 August 2006
Much as I love reading books about Lance Armstrong I feel cheated having bought this one. The reason why - it is exactly the same as Daniel Coyle's other book entitled 'Lance Armstrong tour de force (tough guys, flawed heroes and one man's battle for ultimate supremacy)'

Oh I should be fair and say there is one difference, the 'Afterword' has been added to this book which isn't in the other one. So if you don't mind waiting until page 315 before you read something original then you are in for a 20 page treat!

In summary therefore, the publishers have produced books each with a different cover and title which are exactly the same. To my mind, the 20 pages extra pages in this book make it an expensive buy.
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on 25 September 2007
I had just finished "It's Not About The Bike" when my wife -- a keen cyclist -- turned to me and said, "That's only half the story." She handed me "Lance Armstrong's War." "Here's the other half of the story."

You know a good book when you should be doing other things and... you can't put the book down. Bills don't get paid. E-mails don't get answered. You spend too long in the loo. "WAR" is one of those books.

Naturally you need to have some passing fascination with the world of professional cycling. For me it was watching the Tour de France and wanting to know more about how it all worked. Daniel Coyle will lead any interested reader into a fascinating world...

An opera needs to be written about the Tour. The melodrama. The characters. The morality plays. The blood. The guts. The insanity. The money. The doping. The journey. The jeering crowds. The test. The human spirit. Victory and loss. It's all there, a nice thick juicy slice of Life! And a huge bite or two of that slice is in WAR.

On the cover of my copy Sports Illustrated has described WAS as a "literary tour de force." A bit of a snob when it comes to writing I noted to myself, (a) What would Sports Illustrated know about literature? and (b) Daniel Coyle's a SPORTS writer for God's sake!

And... the writing is wonderful. Great character sketches. You'll get all the ins and outs of race strategy, sponsorships, training. You'll see France. You'll get a great glimpse of what Bob (Bobke) Rolls calls Eurotrash. You'll love the wry humor and jaundiced eye. Just wait until you meet the Lance hangers-on, "The Dudes" and "The Bros." Be prepared to LOL.

So if you're at all curious about this fascinating world -- but, like me, are either too old or too wise not to join it (!) -- WAR is Highly Recommended. You're in for a good read.

Dr. Kirtland C Peterson
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on 3 July 2009
Lance Armstrongs war and Lance Armstrongs tour de force are identical books, please can you add this to your advertising of the book
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on 12 December 2006
I was going to buy this one; fortunately, Amazon have their wonderful `Search Inside' feature, which unusually I made use of, and what do you know? It's exactly the same as `Lance Armstrong tour de force'. The chapter headings and the first chapter are identical: word for word. Why the publisher re-published the same book with a new title we'll probably never know; maybe they wanted to confuse everybody.

The title of the book suggests that this is a Lance Armstrong biography, but it's more than that. It's a look at the whole world of professional cycling, covering one season, and culminating in the Tour de France.

For a `factual' book, it reads like a crime thriller with the plot twisting and turning every which way it can. It contains suspense, politics, conspiracy theorists, bad guys, mad scientists and love and romance. Like every crime thriller, it has its hero: Lance Armstrong, but the book would be no where without it's rich supporting cast of cyclists like Jan Ullrich, Tyler Hamilton, Alexandre Vinokourov, Iban Mayo, Floyd Landis and Ivan Basso. The book examines their lives in almost as much details as Armstrong's: their backgrounds, how they train, and how they perceive Armstrong. It also includes a cast of none-cyclists: trainers like Dr. Michele Ferrari (aka Dr. Evil), Armstrong's ex-mechanic Anderson, now ex-girlfriend Sheryl Crow (aka Jaunita Cuervo) and many more.

We see how Armstrong has to contend with more than just winning the Tour de France; he has to contend with the multitude enemies, seemingly lead by journalist David Walsh, that are just out to get him: those that want to `prove' that he took performance enhancing drugs and in doing so make there own fortunes. We also see Armstrong's response to these allegations, which, to my mind, only serve to make him harder and more determined than ever to become the cycling equivalent of the unstoppable Arnold Schwarzenegger in the film `Terminator' and to win the race.

`Lance Armstrong tour de force' is excellent: the best book I've read all year: can't wait for the movie.
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on 14 November 2010
The book is written by a sports journalist who chose to relocate his family and spend quite some time in Europe, following Lance Armstrong around, finding a way into his entourage - Lance's Planet - and his busy on- and off-competition schedule built around 2005 Tour de France.

The book is written in a supposedly objective tone and the author tries to keep it up firmly, but by the halfway mark the reader finds herself a bit confused, as if she doesn't know what and who to believe anymore. Personally, I thing that comes from the author's inability to decide whether he likes Armstrong or not.

For the record, I'm a major fan of Armstrong's, so whatever I read on the subject, I interpret with the same reverence and LA-rules attitude I have for quite some time now. So I looked at the book through my fan lenses and I took the best out of it. But that didn't stop me from sensing hesitation all along, a somewhat unclear portrayal of LA, like he cannot decide whether he's a good guy or a bad ass.

I read Lance's books - "It's not abut the bike" and "Every second counts" - and absolutely loved them. I found an extremely ambitious guy in there but not a robot. A dedicated disciplinarian, but not a machine. And perhaps that is the reson I'm a bit confused about this book, because it portrays LA like some sort of robotical mathematician figure, as opposed to his opponents who are "the most talented rider", "the best climber", etc. Lance is nowhere described as "the best" anything, which lives me longing for some praise. Com'on man, you chose to write a book about this guy, don't you have antthing to say about his abilities?

Other than that, the book is very well documented and researched, with several stories-in-story, with interviews and insights that only a truly dedicated cycling fan would uncover. Definitely a go for those interested in the subject.
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on 27 November 2012
This is surely an interesting read for someone who has no idea who Lance Armstrong is, or has not read any other books about him. However, reading this after having read both books from Lance and also one from his mum Linda, this is just a plane book without any serious information. I am not even sure why it is called "war" as there are not really any big wars mentioned, apart that Armstrong consideres many people to be "trolls" and adds them to his black list. There is info about Walshe's book - L.A. Confidental, which is good that at least it mentions there are some people who really do not believe he is clean of doping (but Lance prohibited Daniel from giving more details in this book)... but overall: it is very visible that this book was firstly reviewed by planet called Lance.. and only nice things can be written. Surely author wants to look very neutral and mentions also other drivers, which is interesting as it is good to know more about Landis, Hamilton etc.. but overall, it does not have such a big influence on overall "Lance picture".. I have already on my desk the other book to read - which Daniel Coyle wrote with Hamilton and I guess that will be whole new story. Anyways, if you have enough time, read it, it will not kill you, but it will not bring anything new either.
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on 10 January 2013
Good read, but many more books of this topic will flood the market no doubt, I think they can be just repeat of what we beginning to know out there.
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on 18 December 2013
Its OK now its all out about Lance, had to read it but just can't believe in or trust the guy ever again. Thats the plane truth
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on 15 September 2014
Excellent value, book in great condition and has survived many re-reads, thanks, seller!!
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on 4 March 2015
good, but much of it has been written about before....nothing very revealing to date.
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