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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nietzsche by Martin Heidegger, 8 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Nietzsche: The Will to Power as Art v. 1 (Nietzsche, Vols. I & II) (Paperback)
This book and its companion volume, Nietzsche, the Will to Power as Knowledge and Metaphysics, are important from the point of view of understanding the development of Heidegger's thought. They allow us to see how his thought evolved in the crucial years from 1930 to The Letter on Humanism (1947). The volumes present us with Heidegger's lectures on Nietzsche delivered in the years 1936-40, and some articles he wrote on him from 1940 to 1946. The lectures make easy reading compared with most of Heidegger's published works.
Heidegger's first series of lectures in this volume is entitled The Will to Power as Art. By will to power Nietzsche meant an enhancement or heightening of life. This will to power appears most clearly in the artist, particularly in the artist of the grand style, who puts forward a vision of life as a whole. The demand for such a vision of life becomes most pressing only when a person has fully appreciated the nihilism of the present world. It is only then that he feels the great pressure to find a solution, and it is then too that he becomes fully conscious of the inadequacy of his resources for dealing with the problem. The individual feels this demand as a great burden weighing down on him.Yet it is a demand that he must meet if he is to become the one he essentially is.
We are here approaching the thought of the eternal return of the same, the subject of the second series of lectures in this volume. If a person allows his existence to drift in fear and ignorance, then the individual moments of his life will come again; they will be the same in that they are all fleeting and evasive moments. But if he shapes something supreme out of the next moment, if he notes well and retains the consequences, then that moment will come again and will continue to return in its essential characteristics. A stable, eternal element will be introduced into the flux of becoming.
Heidegger is not primarily interested in this philosophy of life of Nietzsche. What he is interested in is a greater understanding of truth as unconcealment. He reflects on Nietzsche's writings in order to grow in his own understanding of truth and Being.
Professor Krell has provided a very readable translation. His concluding Analysis also supplies a great deal of helpful background and a synoptic account of Heidegger's aims.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nietzsche by Martin Heidegger, 8 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Nietzsche: The Will to Power as Art v. 1 (Nietzsche, Vols. I & II) (Paperback)
This book and its companion volume, Nietzsche, the Will to Power as knowledge and Metaphysics, are important from the point of view of understanding the development of Heidegger's thought. They allow us to see how his thought evolved in the crucial years from 1930 to The Letter on Humanism (1947). The volumes present us with Heidegger's lectures on Nietzsche delivered in the years 1936-40, and some articles he wrote on him from 1940 to 1946. The lectures make easy reading compared with most of Heidegger's published works.
Heidegger's first series of lectures in this volume is entitled The Will to Power as Art. By will to power Nietzsche meant an enhancement or heightening of life. This will to power appears most clearly in the artist, particularly in the artist of the grand style, who puts forward a vision of life as a whole. The demand for such a vision of life becomes most pressing only when a person has fully appreciated the nihilism of the present world. It is only then that he feels the great pressure to find a solution, and it is then too that he becomes fully conscious of the inadequacy of his resources for dealing with the problem. The individual feels this demand as a great burden weighing down on him.Yet it is a demand that he must meet if he is to become the one he essentially is.
We are here approaching the thought of the eternal return of the same, the subject of the second series of lectures in this volume. If a person allows his existence to drift in fear and ignorance, then the individual moments of his life will come again; they will be the same in that they are all fleeting and evasive moments. But if he shapes something supreme out of the next moment, if he notes well and retains the consequences, then that moment will come again and will continue to return in its essential characteristics. A stable, eternal element will be introduced into the flux of becoming.
Heidegger is not primarily interested in this philosophy of life of Nietzsche. What he is interested in is a greater understanding of truth as unconcealment. He reflects on Nietzsche's writings in order to grow in his own understanding of truth and Being.
Professor Krell has provided a very readable translation. His concluding Analysis also supplies a great deal of helpful background and a synoptic account of Heidegger's aims.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, 8 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Nietzsche: The Will to Power as Art v. 1 (Nietzsche, Vols. I & II) (Paperback)
Yet another one of those books which show that whilst he will always be a challenging and indeed difficult thinker, Heidegger is far from the unreadable stereotype held by so many people who have tried and failed to read Being and Time.

Heidegger is at his best, as here, when he is lecturing. I had not previously appreciated how important Nietzsche was to his thinking. Heidegger is often accused of remaking Nietzsche in his own image but whether this is the case or not (I tend to disagree) Heidegger's thinking will stimulate new ways of thinking about Nietzsche.

Very strongly recommended to anyone with an interest in either.
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Nietzsche: The Will to Power as Art v. 1 (Nietzsche, Vols. I & II)
Nietzsche: The Will to Power as Art v. 1 (Nietzsche, Vols. I & II) by David Farrell Krell (Paperback - 17 July 1991)
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