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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic of its type
Boxing as a sport has, more than any other, produced a body of literature disproportionate to the number of genuine fans. Although it's easy to find a of hack jobs amongst these volumes that can safely bear comparison with that generally most facile of sports books, the footballer's autobiography, when boxing writing excels, more than any other sporting genre, it can lay...
Published on 3 Feb 2008 by John Walsh

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars he's a character who thinks he's as tough as the heavyweight champ!
i quite enjoyed this book, it's an easy read. teddy atlas is in awe of his father, and it seems as if he tries to live up to an idealised memory of his father. teddy comes on the moral high ground and is never wrong, about anything! he wants to be known and respected as a man of principle. on boxing, there is no denying he knows his stuff. what made me laugh is how he...
Published on 12 Jan 2008 by S. J. Fox


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic of its type, 3 Feb 2008
By 
John Walsh (Croydon, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
Boxing as a sport has, more than any other, produced a body of literature disproportionate to the number of genuine fans. Although it's easy to find a of hack jobs amongst these volumes that can safely bear comparison with that generally most facile of sports books, the footballer's autobiography, when boxing writing excels, more than any other sporting genre, it can lay claim to genuine literary quality. When did an author of the stature of Norman Mailer last pen a volume dedicated to any other sport?

Happily, this is one of best boxing books that you'll ever read.

As with most memorable sporting biographies, the book isn't really about boxing. Rather, it covers the most enigmatic of themes; one man's redemption.

Anyone who is familiar with Teddy Atlas as the rather colourful, stereotypical New York commentator and fight game "character" gracing the trans-Atlantic boxing "reviews" found by accident on various UK cable channels will be familiar with a scar enveloping roughly half of his face. Be assured that this was inflicted completely without anaesthetic during a childhood and youth spent running wild in the type of neighbourhood found only in Hollywood B movies and certain parts of the New York.

Atlas's survival of this knife wound owed much to the fact both that he had some friends close at hand and the fact that they acted sufficiently promptly to staunch the blood flow. The fact that he managed to find himself in this situation at all also seems somewhat mystifying in that his father was not either absent or a thug, but the neighbourhood physician.

Amazingly, Atlas's wake-up call came not in the form of his attacker's blade, but in the intervention of Cus D'Amato and his boxing camp in the Catskill Mountains.

D'Amato, like a number of characters in this story, was truly larger than life. One part Svengali and, depending on who you believe, three parts charlatan, D'Amato was famed for having found and developed Floyd Paterson into a world heavyweight champion and was shortly to do the same for Mike Tyson. D'Amato was also notorious for his strict disciplinarian approach and "code" of honour, which Atlas swallowed hook line and sinker. In fact, the main difference between the two was that the old man was perfectly capable of bending the rules when he thought it was necessary. Atlas wasn't, and it's the resulting searing honesty that blazes through this account of his life and serves to make him extremely likeable, even when some of the actions he is describing are impossible to condone. In a world of knives in the back, you'll know when Atlas is coming for you and you'll be sure to see him when he does.

In addition to an unerring perspective on events, Atlas had the good fortune to be in a number of interesting places at the right time. He is probably best known as one of Mike Tyson's first trainers and his insight and views on Tyson, at odds with many others, are fascinating, as is his description of an infamous gymnasium confrontation with the teenage future champion. One of Atlas's other main claim to fame was as the trainer who took Michael Moorer to the heavyweight title, largely by dint of a particularly unorthodox motivational technique in the title bout, one which proves wholly consistent with the trainer's controversial views on human nature, or at least what he thinks it should be.

Although the majority of the book is located in a boxing context, as noted above much of this is really incidental; its true subject is people and Atlas's own unique perspective. As such, it traverses the human condition from humour to tragedy. Atlas's description of his own dysfunctional family, and in particular the tragic death of his grandmother, is at times intensely moving in the same way that his description of his wife's behaviour when facing down a street thug is at the same time somewhat profane but hilarious. The book may also serve as something of an eye opener to one of Atlas's former protégés, the Canadian light heavyweight Donny Lalond. After they split on terms that offended Atlas's code, it wasn't a knife that Atlas went after him with, but it is to both men's advantage that Lalond wasn't to be found.

Overall, highly recommended; this is a book that will be of particular interest to boxing fans but has also more than enough to satisfy anyone who is interested in human motivation.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Read!, 26 Aug 2006
By 
C. Berry "Chris" (Boston, MA) - See all my reviews
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I read "Atlas" in less than a week. I couldn't put the book down. The book has everything, including lessons on boxing and even more lessons about life. The book details his life in New York and adventures with Mike Tyson and Michael Moorer. Teddy Atlas is an amazing human being. Buy this book, you won't be sorry!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ***** A KNOCK-OUT !! *****, 7 Sep 2007
By 
Dominik Erne (Lustenau, Austria) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
A great book with lots of interesting background information. Eyebrow raising stories about the things going on beyond the ring, (which are usually not seen or heard), told in a first-hand account. Teddy Atlas is very honest about himself and everything involved in his life and career. I could not put it down...

=> A great book for anybody interested in boxing, the US boxing industry, or, of course, Teddy Atlas!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars he's a character who thinks he's as tough as the heavyweight champ!, 12 Jan 2008
By 
S. J. Fox "foxy" (doncaster, england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
i quite enjoyed this book, it's an easy read. teddy atlas is in awe of his father, and it seems as if he tries to live up to an idealised memory of his father. teddy comes on the moral high ground and is never wrong, about anything! he wants to be known and respected as a man of principle. on boxing, there is no denying he knows his stuff. what made me laugh is how he faces down so many genuinely tough men - he thinks he is harder than michael moorer! the impression i got was that teddy would have loved to have been a champion boxer and, as a trainer, found it hard to let the fighter have the limelight, he wanted some of it for himself. a suprise was that he had very little to say about kevin rooney, who was presumably a big part of his life in the early 80's.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 10 July 2014
This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
Superb book. Very visual and a ver impressive individual
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great boxing book, 22 April 2014
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Honest and searing, very hard hitting at times. Great insight, I really enjoyed this book and have re-read it again.
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4.0 out of 5 stars grat insight, 9 Oct 2013
By 
Charlie Suku (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
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Brilliant book and insight into the world that goes beyond the boxers more than a boxer that wins the fight.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A terrific read, 31 Mar 2013
By 
N. H. Firman "oldtimer" (Pembroke. Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
One of the best boxing books I have read, what a great character, he really opens up what goes to be a great trainer, warts & all.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My opinion., 20 Jan 2013
By 
Craig Mansfield (uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
In my opinion, the only down side to this book, is that it's not long enough, although it's 278 pages of small type, and only a few (black and white) photographs, I wanted it to last longer.
It's a great read, full of anecdotes, emotion, and fascinating information.
I was sad to read how Teddy didn't get the credit he often deserved, especially as he often lost things to keep his principles.
Definitely the type of guy you'd like as a friend.

My favourite book in a long time.
Also it feels nice, not all books feel nice in your hand, but this one does, matt, smooth and flexible.
I'll be reading it again and again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just read it!, 21 Sep 2011
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This review is from: Atlas: From the Streets to the Ring: A Son's Struggle to Become a Man (Paperback)
I have just finished this book "Atlas" and would have to say this is one of the best books I have read. Even if you are not a boxing fan you will enjoy this , Teddy has lived a life that will keep you glued to the pages. This book is begging to be made into a movie! Buy this book and I promise you you will want to leave a review. Well done Teddy.
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