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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of her best
This is definitely amongst the best Agatha Christie novels I've read, and it feels even better in this lovely 'new' facsimile edition. The novel caused a stir (relatively speaking) at the time because it's written in the first person... and particularly for another reason! Read it to find out. The first person narrative feels odd at first, but the narrator is very...
Published on 3 Mar 2007 by Androo

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Murder story
I am a fan of Agatha Christie but the only slight problem with this book opn Kindle is that it is abridged. This took away from my enjoyment. Amazon should advertise this fact at point of purchase. However, great story
Published 22 months ago by Wendy Johnson


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and Audacious, 12 May 2006
By 
Poldy "Paul" (Darwen, Lancashire) - See all my reviews
The narrator, Doctor Sheppard, tells us of the murder and the subsequent investigation. Poirot, missing his old friend Hastings, is glad to have someone with whom he can discuss the case. At first, everything looks clear: the murdered man's son has disappeared. But what has he to do with the recent death of a woman who was being blackmailed?

Christie once claimed that she wrote this mystery because a friend of hers complained that she could always guess the solution to the mysteries she read. Christie took up the challenge to write a mystery whose solution would be unguessable. With The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, she succeeded admirably.

The only real downside I could see to the book is that it is hard to tell the various characters apart. Of course, one must be wary of criticizing the writer for not doing what she was never trying to do, and characterization was never her main purpose. The point of her mysteries is to be hard to guess, and in this she succeeds more often than not. This is one of her most intricate and entertaining stories, with one or two well-drawn characters. Doctor Sheppard's sister, Caroline, the village gossip, becomes quite irritating, in the way I feel she would be in real life. Christie later said that Caroline was the main inspiration for Miss Marple. The condescension of many of the characters towards Poirot himself, seeing him as an odd little foreigner, is well-observed and becomes an amusing running joke. Of course, Poirot has the last laugh as it becomes clear that he has the murderer in his sights almost from the first.

I have not read many of Christie's books, and they are something of a guilty pleasure, but in today's world, her depiction of a simpler age is very welcome. For those new to Ms Christie, this would be an ideal place to start.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good book which had me fooled, 7 Mar 2010
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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Classic Christie with some special twists that make it clear why this is one of the most popular of Hercule Poirot's adventures. When Roger Acroyd is murdered the help of Poirot is quickly enlisted to find out which of his friends/family was the culprit.

It's interesting that Poirot's usual assistant, Captain Hastings, has been written out 'to the Argentine' and the narrator's spot is taken by one of the characters close to the victim - the local doctor. This provides a good point of view as it's someone who knows and can explain the characters' backgrounds, and who doesn't understand Poirot - whereas Hastings would have come to expect things. Unlike some of the Marple novels which have this structure, it doesn't feel as if the detective has been shoehorned in, but is there as a natural extension of his own ongoing narrative.

The Christie clichés are still present - the large country house full of suspects, all of whom have motive, opportunity and secrets (but then that's integral to the mystery). It's amazing that I can read these still without seeing through the clues. I need to remember in future that nothing is mentioned by Christie without being relevant, even tiny things - it was not until about two pages before the reveal that I fell in, and everything that had been mentioned clicked. Christie really was a genius.

So yes, it's a good book and it certainly had me fooled, although a couple of bits were a little 'meta' - with the doctor writing the narrative forming a part of the narrative, and even lending his manuscript to Poirot. A satisfying mystery.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Genius, 4 Feb 2008
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Rather than fill up space with unnecessary rubbish, I think that if you truely think about the plots in Christies' books, they are pure genius, way ahead of there time, and before anyone slates her work i would like them to really think about the fact that her books were very original in plot, while in setting they were very typically unoriginal. She has a style almost completely of her own, and I dont think there has been one bad book she has written.
However a lot of reviews on Amazon are controversial, some giving even 2 or 3 stars, just for the fact that some weren't everyones cup a tea. And I dont really think there are many people who write these reviews are even qualified to judge them. There are a lot of really great books on Amazon that have had had dire reviews by morons who dont even know what their talking about, or wrote a rubbish review purely because of the fact that they bought a book that wasn't their cup of tea. I hate to see this.
I'm not just talking about Agatha Christie, but a lot of other authors who have written smashing novels for the right fan base, but get slated because some small minded idiot decided to read it and it wasn't for them.
In my Opinion you can ignore most of the reviews UNLESS there are about ten different people saying they are rubbish. Then fair enough. But when you get a review with 8 people giving 5 stars, and 5 giving 2, you cant make a decision on that. My advice is to buy it if you like it and dont worry about the reviews. At the worst youv'e wasted a couple of quid-so what! It would be worse to listen to idiots that gave a good book a bad review without reason, and not to buy it. Now i've got that off my chest, happy reading, love you all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Archetypal Christie mystery with a sting in the tail, 10 Feb 2002
By 
L. C. Jones (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Some of Christie's finest detective stories are the one-offs, like 'And Then There Were None'. Whilst The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is ostensibly part of her Poirot series, since the Belgian detective is now officially retired and his erstwhile Watson-esque sidekick Captain Hastings is in Argentina, there is a new narrator, Dr Shepard, which gives this novel the air of a one-off. The action, as usual, is set in rural England. A rich widow who poisoned her husband commits suicide because she is being blackmailed; shortly afterwards, the man everyone thought would remarry her, Roger Ackroyd, is murdered. The formula of the novel is classic Agatha Christie: there is a massive range of suspects, ranging from the butler to the spendthrift step-son who inherits the Ackroyd fortune, each with possible motives, and Poirot is brought in to assist the bumbling police investigation. Unlike other Christie characters, such as the dreadfully dull Miss Marple, Poirot is an amusing character and brings sparkle to a range of otherwise stereotypical characters - the hired help, the annoying matron, the army officer, the family doctor and so on. That said, this is one of her funnier novels, the narrator's (rather misognystic) observations of his nosey spinster sister Caroline being particularly amusing. If you enjoy detective novels, you will enjoy Agatha Christie; if you like Agatha Christie, you will enjoy this archetypal piece of her work. If one reads enough Christie, one begins to detect her formula and manage to deduce the murderer before the final revelation (which, as usual, occurs after all the major suspects are gathered together to be lectured by Poirot); however, owing to the format change (a new narrator), even Christie veterans are likely to be left guessing up to the last few pages.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd, 12 Sep 2007
I enjoyed this book a lot but I guessed who did it, so the detective aspect of the story was ruined, but that didn't stop the book from being extremely enjoyable and I also think that it is enjoyable to read about the detecting process, even though I guessed the conclusion. Most other reviewers found the ending amazing and practically unguessable, I am probably just used to her books.

The novel is narrated by the doctor in the story, Dr Sheppard. Poirot becomes Dr Sheppard's next door neighbour and soon after, Roger Ackroyd is murdered and Poirot decides to investigate the case.

Poirot has to find out who the murderer is, based on such clues as a missing suicide note left by the woman that Roger Ackroyd loved, a telephone call telling Dr Sheppard that Roger Ackroyd had been murdered, and the attempt to frame Ralph Paton.

This book is considered to be Agatha Christie's first masterpiece ( it was one of her earlier book's ) and it is definitely great. It portray's Poirot's personality, brilliantly, because it is shown by somebody elses point of view. This is the type of book that can be enjoyed by both new fans and old fans of Christie, alike. Although, I guessed the conclusion, unless you are well acquainted with her style, you will almost definitely not guess the conclusion before Poirot reveals it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a good book, 8 Jan 1999
By A Customer
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is an interesting, and creative book by Agatha Cristie. I consider the Murder of Roger Ackroyd one of her best mystery books. The main character, Hercule Poirot solves the case of the murder of Mr. Ackroyd. With the help of clues, and as Hercule says, "his little gray cells," he puts the pieces together discovers the most unpredictable murderer. When Cristie reveals the murderer, it leaves you dumbfounded. It's a great mystery and very enjoyable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie! What more do you need!, 5 Oct 1998
By A Customer
Truly the best of the man with the little grey cells from the author who has it all! This book has everything! I noticed someone said don't read this right away. I disagree! I read this 5 months ago and have been hooked ever since. The best part is in the last chapter when Poirot reveals that the murder is..... You'l have to read to find out! *Also great by Christie: The Mysterious Affair at Styles, One, Two, Buckle my Shoe, & Cards on the Table
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SPOILER!, 12 Dec 2013
By 
This book was slightly a victim of it's own success for me. I only read about two reviews but it was described as ground breaking with a plot twist etc. I haven't read much crime and I've never read a crime novel written in a first person narrative before so I must admit I did think there was a chance we had an unreliable narrator, and after that I just looked for signs that linked him to the case. From that perspective he is an obvious suspect. Basically, it was my own fault for reading the reviews. That said, it didn't spoil the novel for me at all. It was intricate and suspenseful. The clues were revealed in a way that was not at all tedious as it has been with other crime novels I have read. The characters were interesting. It was surprising but not unbelievable. It's everything I feel a crime novel should be and I am not surprised that it was voted the best crime novel ever by the CWA. I just wish I could turn back time and not have read the reviews first!

I very much like the hypothesis mentioned at the end that we may still be being deceived further and that Caroline may be the murderer. It is left open in this sense.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Christie, 21 Aug 2013
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I decided it was time for me to open up one of my all-time favourite Agatha Christie books for a re-read. I've now lost count of the number of times I have read this book but I still enjoy it enormously.

This is a Hercule Poirot murder mystery and in the story he of the "little grey cells" is in retirement (as if!) attempting to tend to veg marrows when the death of a neighbour, a wealthy widow, occurs. Of course Poirot investigates. The narrator of the story is another neighbour, Dr James Sheppard; he steps into the role of sidekick to Poirot in the absence of Captain Hastings. The murder of Roger Ackroyd follows hard on the heels of the first death. The Ackroyd home is stuffed full of suspects including family, friends and staff. Nicely paced and cleverly plotted, the story contains classic Christie touches such as more than one character having something to hide and wrong doers relying on split second timings. The book is famed for the wonderful twist at the end, which still divides readers, and even though I know what is coming I still marvel at the ingenuity and can cast my mind back to the out-and-out surprise of the first time I read it.

An inspired and standout 5* mystery.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Murder story, 13 Jan 2013
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I am a fan of Agatha Christie but the only slight problem with this book opn Kindle is that it is abridged. This took away from my enjoyment. Amazon should advertise this fact at point of purchase. However, great story
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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Poirot)
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Poirot) by Agatha Christie (Paperback - 26 Sep 2013)
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