Customer Reviews


149 Reviews
5 star:
 (109)
4 star:
 (29)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of her best
This is definitely amongst the best Agatha Christie novels I've read, and it feels even better in this lovely 'new' facsimile edition. The novel caused a stir (relatively speaking) at the time because it's written in the first person... and particularly for another reason! Read it to find out. The first person narrative feels odd at first, but the narrator is very...
Published on 3 Mar 2007 by A. Butterfield

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Murder story
I am a fan of Agatha Christie but the only slight problem with this book opn Kindle is that it is abridged. This took away from my enjoyment. Amazon should advertise this fact at point of purchase. However, great story
Published 18 months ago by Wendy Johnson


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of her best, 3 Mar 2007
By 
A. Butterfield (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This is definitely amongst the best Agatha Christie novels I've read, and it feels even better in this lovely 'new' facsimile edition. The novel caused a stir (relatively speaking) at the time because it's written in the first person... and particularly for another reason! Read it to find out. The first person narrative feels odd at first, but the narrator is very believable. This is a well structured and complex plot. A semi-retired Poirot is looked at from a different angle, but he is just as effective and there are some nice set pieces - in particular the beautifully written 'mah jong' scene that's a joy to read. The denoument is satisfying. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Ultimate Deception, 8 Nov 2008
By 
A.K.Farrar "AKF" (Timisoara, Romania) - See all my reviews
Agatha Christie's job, as a writer of Detective Novels, was, paradoxically, to hide the criminal - much like a spiv with the card game, Hide the Lady. Even though the punter aims to find the card - and makes wild guesses (based, of course, on superior talents) the side-show spiv will win every time - maybe it's just a trick, a slight of hand, but we come back again and again in the vain hope of putting one over on the expert.

Not much hope, I'm afraid!

`The Murder of Roger Ackroyd' has to be Ms Christie's ultimate deception - it certainly had me fooled right `til the end. No matter where I looked, the Lady was hidden.

Up pop all the usual suspects - and with a Christie you know if someone is accused, it isn't them. One by one she knocks out everyone - and I do mean everyone! Surely she hasn't had a total stranger do the murder?

No, the wrist works it's magic: Poirot, shows you the superiority of his little gray cells and you loose again.

And I can't tell you the secret - I won't spoil the thrill.

What I will say is it is beautifully done.

Agatha Christie manages here to exploit the genre `Detective Novel' in a way which relies on the reader's knowledge of all the usual tricks, of lulling them into a false sense of security and then flipping them onto their backs. It is a book to be read rather than a story to be told - and despite the amazing craftsmanship of Granada television's version with David SuchetPoirot - Agatha Christie's Poirot - The Murder Of Roger Ackroyd [1989], it fails precisely because this is not only a story but an exploration of the relationship between reader and writer.

Poirot has gone into retirement - Hastings is away in Argentina, Scotland Yard is not involved. A local rich man is the victim of murder (the only one, incidentally in the story - the TV version needed to double the number, bring Inspector Japp in where he wasn't wanted and simplify the plot by removing a couple of key characters). There is blackmail and love, lost wedding rings and phone calls in the night.

Poirot, after throwing marrows around, one of which lands in his neighbour's garden and smashes open at the feet of the doctor, is brought in on the sidelines - he hardly features in fact. There is a chair out of place, a man arrested in Liverpool, and the delicate feelings of the local constabulary all to be taken into consideration.

And a lot of consideration is being done by a local tribe of Miss Marples. Nosey old women pop up in profusion - and references to the greatest detective of all times can't be avoided: The story is retold by the Doctor whose shoes were splattered - a Watson to Poirot's Holmes.

As you would expect, it is the twist and turns of the plot that matter rather than deep characterisation, but to suggest the book is shallow as a result would be to deny the profound insight Ms Christie shows into the psychology of her readership.

The term masterpiece has been justifiably applied to the book - and I fully concur.

Just make sure you read the book before you see the film!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hercule Poirot gets embroiled in murder - again, 10 Dec 2000
Agatha Christie really exercises her ability to write ingenious crime fiction in this story. Featuring the well-known and lovable Hercule Poirot, we follow his attempts to retire peacefully in a country village setting, and see them blown away when a murderer strikes. As usual, Christie deceives the reader in a most satisfactory way, which is perhaps the most I should say about it. Immensely enjoyable, and the reader should find him or herself reading it over and over again to spot the clues that were missed the first time around.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Genius, 1 Sep 2002
By A Customer
You have to read this book twice- first time as a mystery, second time knowing who the murderer was and spotting all the clues that make the answer seem so obvious... (once you know who it is, you wonder how you could have been so deceived!) A really engaging story with a delicious twist at the end! This book is worth more than 5 stars!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of Agatha Christie and Hercule Poirot, 18 Aug 2000
By A Customer
'The Murder of Roger Ackroyd' is the brightest jewel amongst Agatha Chrisite's crime novels. The plot of the murder is so intricate and complex, yet so logical, that only the brilliant grey cells of Hercule Poirot at their full 'methodical' capacity can allow the reader to comprehend its degree of ingenuity. The suspects are numerous; the entire staff employed at Ackroyd's mansion, his own son as well as his sister in law and her daughter. All possess the equal potential of being the murderer. With Dr.Sheppard substituting the role of Poirot's faithful companion Hastings, the road towards the truth is long but entirely bearable, as Agatha Christie demonstrates why she is the queen of crime, once and for all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I know the murderer is in this room...All the facts lead indisputably to one person.", 22 Jan 2007
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
As seductive as a sudoku puzzle, with all the facts of a devilish murder laid out for the reader to solve, if only s/he reads carefully enough, this 1926 mystery is still captivating new readers. A contemporary of popular mystery writers Dorothy Sayers and Marjorie Allingham, Christie writes novels which are less character-driven than Sayers's novels and less elitist (and sometimes satirical) than Allingham's. Instead, Christie carves out a niche writing mysteries with unusually clever plots, even if, as in this case, she has to violate the conventions of the mystery/detective genre to make them work.

No spoilers. When Hercule Poirot, the French detective who uses his "little gray cells," retires and moves to the small rural village of King's Abbott, he quickly learns of the death of Mrs. Ferrars, who, after her husband's mysterious death, had intended to marry Roger Ackroyd. Soon, however, Roger Ackroyd himself is found dead, stabbed in the back in his study.

An unusual number of complications make this mystery particularly challenging. The disappearance of Ackroyd's stepson (his major heir) is thought to signal his guilt, but there are others who also have motives. A maid has been dismissed under mysterious circumstances, Ackroyd's sister-in-law has serious debts, a stranger has appeared at Fernly Park at the time of the murder and has then disappeared, and Ackroyd himself has been trying to control his estate by securing the marriage of his niece to his stepson.

Details of the mystery are not unique. Christie uses the attempt of a wealthy man to control his heirs' marriages in _Dead Man's Mirror_, for example, along with the familiar concept of a murderer entering and leaving a locked room via a window. Mysterious strangers are a cliché, as are dismissed maids who have secrets. Throughout, the characterization extends only as far as is necessary for the plot. Told by Dr. James Sheppard, a friend and frequent visitor of Ackroyd's, the novel is justifiably one of Christie's most famous, however--and its creative conclusion revolutionized mystery writing not only in its time, but forever. Don't miss this one. Mary Whipple
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SPOILER!, 12 Dec 2013
By 
This book was slightly a victim of it's own success for me. I only read about two reviews but it was described as ground breaking with a plot twist etc. I haven't read much crime and I've never read a crime novel written in a first person narrative before so I must admit I did think there was a chance we had an unreliable narrator, and after that I just looked for signs that linked him to the case. From that perspective he is an obvious suspect. Basically, it was my own fault for reading the reviews. That said, it didn't spoil the novel for me at all. It was intricate and suspenseful. The clues were revealed in a way that was not at all tedious as it has been with other crime novels I have read. The characters were interesting. It was surprising but not unbelievable. It's everything I feel a crime novel should be and I am not surprised that it was voted the best crime novel ever by the CWA. I just wish I could turn back time and not have read the reviews first!

I very much like the hypothesis mentioned at the end that we may still be being deceived further and that Caroline may be the murderer. It is left open in this sense.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Christie, 21 Aug 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I decided it was time for me to open up one of my all-time favourite Agatha Christie books for a re-read. I've now lost count of the number of times I have read this book but I still enjoy it enormously.

This is a Hercule Poirot murder mystery and in the story he of the "little grey cells" is in retirement (as if!) attempting to tend to veg marrows when the death of a neighbour, a wealthy widow, occurs. Of course Poirot investigates. The narrator of the story is another neighbour, Dr James Sheppard; he steps into the role of sidekick to Poirot in the absence of Captain Hastings. The murder of Roger Ackroyd follows hard on the heels of the first death. The Ackroyd home is stuffed full of suspects including family, friends and staff. Nicely paced and cleverly plotted, the story contains classic Christie touches such as more than one character having something to hide and wrong doers relying on split second timings. The book is famed for the wonderful twist at the end, which still divides readers, and even though I know what is coming I still marvel at the ingenuity and can cast my mind back to the out-and-out surprise of the first time I read it.

An inspired and standout 5* mystery.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Murder story, 13 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I am a fan of Agatha Christie but the only slight problem with this book opn Kindle is that it is abridged. This took away from my enjoyment. Amazon should advertise this fact at point of purchase. However, great story
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Defining Christie..., 14 Aug 2012
By 
C. FULLER (Brixham, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
This was the defining novel. This radio production dating from 1987 stars John Moffatt as Hercule Poirot and co-stars John Woodvine as the storyteller and Dr Sheppard. Normally, it is Poirot who recounts the story and so this takes on a rather different style which works extremely well indeed. It was good to hear classical actor Laurence Payne as Roger Ackroyd but I know he was most put out to be offered such small roles by the BBC radio rep. You can also hear Peter Gilmore and Deryck Guyler whose voices are instantly recognisable. The story has good twists and quite a surprise ending and as radio drama goes this is first rate. Enyd Williams directs. Running time approx 90 minutes. Good value price wise and nicely packaged too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Poirot)
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Poirot) by Agatha Christie (Paperback - 26 Sep 2013)
5.51
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews