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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fellowship embarks
A new wave of readers have discovered "The Fellowship of the Ring," thanks to the arrival of the epic movie hits. And that is definitely a good thing, because this trilogy not only spurred the fantasy genre into a respectable position, but also provided the template for virtually every elf, dwarf, lost king, and medieval fantasy world since. It's also a wicked good...
Published on 6 Mar 2006 by E. A Solinas

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3.0 out of 5 stars A WIP....?
Cited elsewhere as the book of the century, and it is a bloody marvellous thing. But Tolkien himself described it as book that grew in the telling, as did it seems all of his major works. But its lumpy. It begins as a kids story and ends up as a truly epic tale. Unfortunately once he had discovered what he'd made he had no time (or interest) to make-over the beginning of...
Published 4 months ago by tenpasteight


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fellowship embarks, 6 Mar 2006
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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A new wave of readers have discovered "The Fellowship of the Ring," thanks to the arrival of the epic movie hits. And that is definitely a good thing, because this trilogy not only spurred the fantasy genre into a respectable position, but also provided the template for virtually every elf, dwarf, lost king, and medieval fantasy world since. It's also a wicked good read.

We open some sixty years after the events of "The Hobbit" -- Bilbo Baggins is older, not much wiser, substantially wealthier, and quite eccentric (one not-so-affectionate nickname is "Mad Baggins"). He has also adopted his bright young cousin Frodo, who was orphaned at a young age and had led a rather fractured life since then. On his 111th birthday, Bilbo suddenly vanishes, leaving behind all his possessions to Frodo -- including the golden ring that allows its wearer to become invisible.

Seventeen years later, Gandalf the wizard shows up again on Frodo's doorstep, and informs the young hobbit that his ring is in fact the One Ring of the Dark Lord Sauron. It inevitably corrupts those who have it, and most of Sauron's power is invested in it. Trying to deflect danger from the Shire, Frodo leaves with his best friend Sam and his loyal cousins Merry and Pippin. But Frodo has only the slightest idea of the hideous and dangerous journey ahead of him, that will take him across Middle-Earth to the evil land of Mordor.

Many fantasy cliches were spawned from this book (although they weren't cliches when Tolkien used them). Orcs, elves, dwarves, halflings, sprawling medieval kingdoms, dethroned kings, gray-bearded wizards and evil Dark Lords. But no one will feel that these are stale; on the contrary, they feel fresh and unused, because that is what they were when the book was first penned.

Narrative-wise, this book begins on much the same note as "The Hobbit": it's lighter and more cheerful, since it opens in the Shire. But darker undertones begin to crop up in the very first chapter, when Bilbo begins clutching at the Ring and speaking in a Gollum-like manner. The pace is pretty slow and gradual until the hobbits reach Bree, at which point it becomes darker, faster and harsher in tone and pace. The matter in it also becomes more mature, particularly in the chilling scenes after Frodo is stabbed by a Nazgul.

One of the things that Tolkien did exceptionally well is atmosphere. With a minimum of words, he conveys the menace of the Black Riders, the beauty of the Elves, the decay of the ancient kingdom of Moria, the mystery of such characters as Aragorn. In some areas, he deliberately didn't elaborate on the such things as the Balrog, leaving the visualization up to the readers.

Another strong point is a sense of epic proportions. Too often a fantasy writer TRIES to write an epic, at the expense of individual character development. Tolkien managed to balance both of them, by focusing on the individuals in the center of epic struggles.

Frodo himself is the quintessential "little guy" hero, one of the last people whom you'd expect to be on a mission to save the world. He's prone to moods of either cheerfulness or sadness, a little immature and bored at the beginning, but incredibly brave and stout-hearted when the pressure is put on him. He has no astounding destiny or special powers to help him. He's simply an ordinary person.

We also have Gandalf, who is fleshed out from the pleasantly crabby wizard of "Hobbit" -- we see more of his hidden sides and powers here. And Frodo is surrounded by a well-rounded cast of characters, including his loyal gardener Sam and his charmingly sneaky cousins, as well as a rich fellowship of ethereal Elves, mysterious men and doughty dwarves.

Tolkien wasn't the first fantasy writer, but he can rightly be described as the first noted fantasy writer, and he remains top of the heap today. "Fellowship of the Ring" is a must-read -- and then go watch the movies again.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing., 26 Oct 2004
By A Customer
Obviously with the hype of the movies slowing, it's time to really appreciate these books again. I was given the whole trilogy of books a couple of months before the first movie came out, but I didn't start reading them until after the second movie was out on DVD. I now realise what a fool I was.
The books are simply brilliant. I don't think anyone with a slight hint of intelligence could speak badly about Tolkien's work. His books have never ceased to amaze audiences around the world, and they may or may not be more popular after the movies than what they have ever been. I'm now re-reading the trilogy for the forth time now, and I can barely put it down. If you have seen the movies and have not yet read the books, I stronlgy reccommend you do. It tells alot more of the story, and many many pages were left out of the movie. Nothing against Peter Jackson, of course. I worship his movies, but nothing will ever match this amazing work by Tolkien.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars lord of the rings trilogy, 29 Oct 2007
By 
Never has a book been so full of joy friendship, sorrow,loyalty,courage,glowing with the absolute pleasure of nature,so much so you are there,breathing and living every moment an excellent book written by a remarkable person, thank you.
kay
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Once you've read this book, you will never escape it's grasp, 30 Sep 2002
Firstly, i was one of those people who thought of Lord of The Rings as a pure fantasy book with no meaning and that it would suck you into a world that was beyond comprehension. HOW WRONG WAS I. The 4 books 1.the hobbit 2. The Fellowship of the Ring 3. The Two Towers and 4. The Return of the King and the prequal to all of those 'The Silmarillion'.
After Reading all the Lord of The Rings books, the whole conecept was unforgetable,. The context of the books was truley amazing ot say the least! The bundle put together by J.R.R. Tolkein, where BRAVEREY, CHIVALRY, BETRAYAL, LOVE, HONOUR, SACRIFICE and how good over comes evil in such away that you will think about it unto the day that you die.
The story (no story is too short a word, epoch) isnt told like a modern day novel like today, the book can lift you up with hope one minute and throw it down again like a rag doll. You will be filled with anxiety when need be and fury when betrayal comes to play it part, for those who feel then cant get into the Lord of the Rings saga then you eill be missing out on what is English literatures greatest achievment.
"The Lord of The Rings"
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, 27 Dec 2013
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I bought this book along with the Two Towers and Return of the King Special Editions. The pattern on the spines of the three books match up to form an image of the White Tree of Gondor - it certainly looks good on the bookshelf!

This book is presented in a green/yellow coloured cloth bound hardcover that looks both attractive and durable. Inside, the first thing you come across is a beautiful map of Middle Earth in black and white (and red) before the story begins. I won't say anything about the story itself as we all know about it and there are in depth reviews floating around on the web (both critical and applauding!). This review is for this particular edition of the book, and I think it is fantastic.

It's worth noting that this "special edition" is available as part of a box set with the other two books in the trilogy, along with a cloth bound version of the Hobbit.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very pleased, 5 Aug 2003
By A Customer
I decided to replace my battered copies of these books, and wanted to go for the set of three (Yes, I know I am excluding the Hobbit here) rather than the single volume edition. This is of course the first of them. The reason I like this particular edition is of course because it is illustrated by Alan Lee, whose illustrations are both hugely popular and also what inspired and informed what we see in the movies directed by Peter Jackson. Alan Lee has also illustrated many other great pieces of work, not only J.R.R Tolkien books, for example, there is a wonderful edition of the Mabinogion that he illustrated.
A second reason to buy these is in the bigger-size of the books. They are large :) And of course, the best bit is that they are hardback, so I do not have to worry about them falling apart like my other ones did.
If you have not read these books, but always wanted to, I would suggest picking up this version of them. The illustrations are wonderful, and the division into three parts combined with the size of the books themselves, make the story very approachable :)
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good way to enjoy Tolkien's Master-piece, 7 Jan 2002
By A Customer
I won't comment on the quality of the Lord of the Rings text as such, because that is well documented elsewhere. What I will say is that Rob Inglis does it justice. It is nice to have the full work presented with prologue; the voices are, whilst not entirely convincing, by no means offensive, the songs are performed in an easy to listen format and are less intrusive than other versions I have heard. All together this is the best recording that I have encountered, and is therefore highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece that you can't get away from..., 25 Dec 2001
By A Customer
It's true; you can't get away from this book, if you've read it, or if you haven't. It's almost a rite of passage nowadays to read 'The Lord of the Rings'! Tolkien's unique style helped me grow up in terms of reading material, and now I see it as a sort of step in my life, one that I treasure, and re-read again, and again, and again...
The first two - and my favourite - of the seven books (usually published in the 1st of 3 volumes) centre around the fellowship set with the task of delivering the Ringbearer - the most unlikely Hobbit, Frodo Baggins (cousin to Bilbo of 'The Hobbit') - to the terrifying land of Mordor and Mount Doom so that the evil-tainted Ruling Ring can be destroyed forever.
It is a remarkable story - or *legend* - that is so full of pure emotion and detail that you are dragged right there alongside Frodo, Sam, Aragorn and the rest. Once you get into it, it's hard to escape! You find yourself asking questions, not only releavant to Middle-Earth, but to modern society as well, so that the book literally broadens your view-point. Everytime you read it, you see something new or afresh, and you ask new questions. It runs extraordinarily deep.
One word of warning, though... don't just buy the first book! You don't want to be left on a cliffhanger for days like I was!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Start Of A Great Adventure!, 1 Mar 2004
I went to see 'The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring' when it first came out at the cinemar in late 2001 and i immediately became a fan of 'The Lord Of The Rings'. After seeing how good the film was, i decided that i would give the book ago, afterall, that was what the film was taken from. Althogh it took quite along time to get through it, due to the fact that there are over five hundred and fifty pages, it was still worth it in the end, and it actually helped me to understand the film a bit more.
Obviously the story is the same as the film. A young hobit called Frodo is given the task of taking 'the one ring' to Mount Doom, and there to destroy it, thus stopping the evil dark lord Sauron getting is hands on it and plunging the world into absolute darkness and destroying all life from Middle Earth.
I can't really say which is better to he honest. Book or film? Film or book? They are equaly as good as each other. The book provides a more detailed look into the journey of the fellowship, while the film give us the action and the brilliant fight scenes that the book cannot show us. I definately found that watching to film first helped me to understand the book a little better, however this will differ from person to person
If you have seen the film and like it then this book is a must-have, or if you are a fan of fantasy books, this will also be a real treat. This book will give your hours of enjoyment, and is probably somthing that you will want to read more than once, i know i did, and all this makes it well worth the money. You will not regret embarking on this great adventure!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The absolute best book(s) ever written!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, 10 Sep 1999
By A Customer
The world created is unlike any other I have read or could hope to read. You feel the suspense as you read along and become part of the secret of the Ring of Power. The characters are wonderful and all have faults that make them seem more real (even Gandalf!). You can feel the terrior of the Barrow Downs and hear the hoof beats of the Black Riders. The book may seem long when you first look at it, but you fly through it as if it were a barely a chapter long. The words paint pictures and they let you be with the characters as they head towards Rivendell. The poem at the beginning of the book has a special meaning to those who have read the book. The poem and book are nonsense if you think about it, but somehow they make sense as you read and nothing will stop you from believing in Middle Earth and Middle Age.
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The Fellowship of the Ring: The Lord of the Rings, Part 1
The Fellowship of the Ring: The Lord of the Rings, Part 1 by J. R. R. Tolkien (Paperback - 30 Aug 2012)
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