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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A road less travelled...
In this book, the prequel to her more successful (and essentially more interesting) volume entitled 'The Downing Street Years', Margaret Thatcher gives us a glimpse into her life, and the events and people who shaped her, basically, who made her who she is.
You'll learn about her time at university, her early days in politics from a personal standpoint...
Published on 9 Mar 2006 by Kurt Messick

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A miracle she won 3 elections
She admits causing the winter of discontent by preaching free collective bargaining in 1978. Margaret admits to no boyfriends before Denis. Jonathan Aitken's book 'Power and Personality' shows this was not so. She asks the reader to believe she did not know what a 2 finger gesture meant. The last part of the book sheds no light on what happened to her after she left No...
Published 5 months ago by Stephen Sharp


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A road less travelled..., 9 Mar 2006
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Path to Power (Hardcover)
In this book, the prequel to her more successful (and essentially more interesting) volume entitled 'The Downing Street Years', Margaret Thatcher gives us a glimpse into her life, and the events and people who shaped her, basically, who made her who she is.
You'll learn about her time at university, her early days in politics from a personal standpoint (for instance, she used to do her own ironing to press dresses immediately before going out, as she couldn't afford to have them pressed, and other small details like this abound), early days in the government and then leading up to the time in opposition prior to the elections of 1979.
Thatcher also adds a postscript to this book, completed after the account of her time as Prime Minister, in which she gives her prescriptions for a better Britain and Europe (in some ways, she might agree that her stance on the Eurocurrency is a la Nancy Reagan, i.e., 'Just say No!'). She has a few swipes at John Major, the man she helped into power, perhaps hoping to be able to be an active and effective agent from behind the scenes. Major retaliates a bit in his own autobiography.
In all, unless you're REALLY into British politics or Thatcher personally, this book could be easily missed. Read 'The Downing Street Years', and, as I've seen you can often pick this book up for some bargain-bin price, buy it so as to have the set. And you might peruse a chapter here and there.
It does have a good style of writing, but goes on quite a bit. Historians will appreciate it, but I often wonder if politicians think that most will actually read through all this material, considering they are invariably written when the author is off the centre stage?
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Path to Power - Margaret Thatcher, 14 April 2009
By 
M. Clements "Mike Clements" (Cardiff) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Path to Power (Paperback)
This book provides a suberb and revealing insight into the mechanics of British politics and the strengths and weaknesses of the government, and the parties in opposition, from the middle of the last century.

The book is written in an incredibly clever fashion, and often one has to re-read a paragraph to clarify the real meaning of a statement or perhaps to analyse a seemingly innocuous 'throwaway' comment, which is really actually quite loaded.

After reading about the writer's formative and early career years, and the strength of character and love of her family, in particular her father; it becomes plain to see why she made such an impact on global politics, the economy, and Britain as whole.

On completing this book, and perhaps the previous volume, The Downing Street Years (which strangely preceded this book, yet covers later events), you will likely agree that Great Britain, and the planet as a whole, owes a great debt to Baroness Thatcher.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A miracle she won 3 elections, 18 July 2014
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This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
She admits causing the winter of discontent by preaching free collective bargaining in 1978. Margaret admits to no boyfriends before Denis. Jonathan Aitken's book 'Power and Personality' shows this was not so. She asks the reader to believe she did not know what a 2 finger gesture meant. The last part of the book sheds no light on what happened to her after she left No 10. She thought single women got pregnant so they would be housed by the council. She would not debate with the PM in the 1979 campaign because she was afraid she might make a mistake.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good read, 8 Oct 2012
This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
My expectations were that this would be much drier and more turgid than the eventful Downing Street Years. Actually it was very readable and interesting, touching on areas that are rarely discussed or understood, particularly the story behind the 2 1974 general elections and leadership challenge.

Thatcher then lists her fears and predictions for the coming years. This book was written in 1995 and her thoughts are disturbingly prescient. The rise of militant Islam, the fall of the Euro, the economic rise of the BRIC nations and much more.

Essential reading for anyone interested in post-war British politics
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Path to Power: One View, 18 Nov 2005
By 
Green mountains (Huntsville, AL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
Mrs. Thatcher formulates conservative political policy with precision; she also communicates it with persuasion. "Path to Power," the account of her pre-Downing street years, opens up some of the history behind those policy decisions. Throughout the book Thatcher marries personal insights with hard economic fact - trade unions, the Heath government, the press, fellow MP's, are all the subject of analysis interspersed with historical narrative of key events.

Mrs. Thatcher lets the reader in on how she herself was moved by events, admitting small missteps and regrets. Her accounts of press reactions to her early speeches against the Soviets are interesting, as is the narrative of the period immediately preceding her first election as PM. The various glimpses into the policy battles within the Heath government are also insightful, but for this reader is was a bit sad to read of some Tory MP's falling out of her favor. Margaret was good at Parliamentary debate, a good communicator; perhaps one can best quantify her success by noting the many policy initiatives that she later carried through Parliament as PM. One of these - privatizing nationalized industry - is now one of her legacies. As a speaker, the reader gets a sense of how she tended to frame issues in terms of their ultimate consequences; as an administrator, we get a view into how she would work to get the right people on her team.

I found it interesting to follow this work (and its sequel) with Major's autobiography (which extends the story of Tory governance to 1997) and with Heath's autobiography. (Major does a fine job describing relationships and interactions, while Heath tends to excel at covering interesting events and movements.)

"Path" seems a good personalized account of politics of the 1970's. The reader sees the beginnings in Mrs. Thatcher's methods; by the end, one sees a formidable, though occasionally struggling, voice for conservatism at the helm of the party. This book prepares one for the follow on and makes for rewarding reading.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worthy but not essential reading, 10 Oct 2006
By 
S. M. Saunders (Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
I read this book after The Downing Street Years, and would generally agree with other reviews: it is simply not as compelling as its predecessor.

I was content to skim over the first few chapters (I rarely find the early years of any biography all that interesting) in anticipation to get to what I really wanted to hear about: her account of her time in Ted Heath's government.

That is, for me, the best part of this book. Her time in Heath's government is covered by two whole chapters, and her views of his leadership and, as she saw it, the 'U'-turn in the early 1970s, couldn't be clearer. But to be fair, though, she does hold up her hand and accept - as a full member of the Cabinet - her share of the blame for that government's ultimate failure.

I certainly think the publishers made a major gaffe by releasing this book AFTER The Downing Street Years which, as mentioned above and by some previous reviewers, was much superior. After the fascinating account of her turbulent years at No 10, this sequel was just bound to be a bit of an anti-climax.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start but...., 12 Jun 2013
By 
Bannon (Carmarthenshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
..... a bit heavy going, and far to complicated for my obviously small brain. Maybe it needs a second read or a better writer.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A road less travelled..., 19 Dec 2005
By 
Kurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (London, SW1) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Path to Power (Paperback)
In this book, the prequel to her more successful (and essentially more interesting) volume entitled 'The Downing Street Years', Margaret Thatcher gives us a glimpse into her life, and the events and people who shaped her, basically, who made her who she is.
One learns about her time at university, her early days in politics from a personal standpoint (for instance, she used to do her own ironing to press dresses immediately before going out, as she couldn't afford to have them pressed, and other small details like this abound), early days in the government and then leading up to the time in opposition prior to the elections of 1979.
Thatcher also adds a postscript to this book, completed after the account of her time as Prime Minister, in which she gives her prescriptions for a better Britain and Europe (in some ways, she might agree that her stance on the Eurocurrency is a la Nancy Reagan, i.e., 'Just say No!'). She has a few swipes at John Major, the man she helped into power, perhaps hoping to be able to be an active and effective agent from behind the scenes. Major retaliates a bit in his own autobiography.
In all, unless one is really into British politics or Thatcher personally, this book could be easily missed. Read 'The Downing Street Years', and, as I've seen once can often pick this book up for some bargain-bin price, buy it so as to have the set. And one might peruse a chapter here and there.
It does have a good style of writing, but goes on quite a bit. Historians will appreciate it, but I often wonder if politicians think that most will actually read through all this material, considering they are invariably written when the author is off the centre stage?
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Road to success, 1 July 2013
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This review is from: The Path to Power (Hardcover)
Margaret Thatcher requires no introduction, but this book brings back to life the hard work and dedication of the person.
She had clear targets and did not detract from her goal, her strength of character and devotion to the British people are hallmarks of this, her standards are developed from her teachings in her young years, clearly influenced by her father.
Margaret Thatcher was an intelligent woman, and an example to others who wish to achieve.
This book is a good read, interesting and informative, and now a valuable asset to any collection.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely well written and enlightening, 20 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Path to Power (Hardcover)
Thoroughly enjoying this book and the insight it gives into politics in early stages of a political career and in Opposition. Mrs T writes clearly and truthfully, not afraid to admit when she got things wrong. Well worth the read and also her first book about the Thatcher years in power.
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The Path to Power
The Path to Power by Margaret Thatcher (Paperback - 5 Jan 2012)
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