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27 Reviews
5 star:
 (15)
4 star:
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars makes you think - a humane and fascinating book
This is a wonderful book - an intelligent, thought provoking read which takes the key theories of Harvard Business School, reviews them through brief but illuminating business case studies, and then goes on to apply them to the lessons of life outside of work and business as well.

A great little business book - it should be given that it is co authored by 3...
Published on 16 Jun 2012 by markr

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Thought Provoking
An interesting book that invites you to consider how you perhaps ought to think about how you might measure yourself as you go through life rather than how most people do. This reflection, combined with the resultant changes in your thoughts and actions, will then lead to positive changes in your behaviour (and therefore feeling) more congruent with your real self.
I...
Published 21 months ago by Hard To Please


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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Really about how Clayton measures his life, 29 May 2013
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There's a paradox at the heart of this book - in using his own life to illustrate the approach he espouses, the author cites examples, such as purpose, that were largely established in his late teens. In business speak, they have not come about as a result of a 'change programme'. Leading by example is a good business practice and the author certainly takes that to heart - too much for my liking. The book is a pleasant enough read, if you don't mind the cloying religious back-drop, and the business snippets are interesting. One of the three authors is identified as an atheist, but appears to make no contribution. In fact, none of the 'self-examples' seem to come from the co-authors. This book will probably just reinforce your existing views rather than stimulate a great change in your life. Although there is an undercurrent of 'holier than thou', the book is not about religion and the messages can be understood through the lens of rationality and belief in the scientific method. So don't be put off if you're an atheist, just don't expect any meaningful examples from the author(s).
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4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 16 July 2014
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I wish I had read this book twenty years ago but it did not exist then. There is a lot of wisdom contained within the pages. It is also a very personal story about how the author learn't to deal with everything life threw at him. It also contains some very insightful knowledge about businesses and how they can succeed or fail. I enjoyed reading it very much.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Promises so much, but delivers so little . . ., 15 Jan 2013
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This review is from: How Will You Measure Your Life? (Hardcover)
This to me is a good lesson about not getting sucked in to 'hype' about a book or product. While the anecdotes about businesses that have struggled with growth or change are interesting, the author annoyingly lacks focus and direction as each chapter stumbles into the next. Maybe I was expecting too much, but I found the book simplistic and full of plain common sense information that most of us will already know if we have lived a little.

The author blends corporate business practise with family life, faith and ethics and it just did not work for me at all. I did however like his way of breaking life down into a series of jobs or tasks, and his empathy with his students was heartwarming, but overall, I found this highly rated book a profound dissapointment.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not what I was expecting...., 25 Mar 2014
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Better and way more useful than a typical self-help book. Less up-itself than a typical business book. This is a quick, elegant and incisive book written by a very clever man and two diligent, supportive co-authors. It tackles a big hairy subject but one that we all struggle with - work life balance - and then wanders into a thornier topic of the purpose of life. I have had the good fortune to meet Clay a couple of times and to have seen him speak. He seems to me to be a man of immense wisdom. For a very simple reason. He is. Read this book. And do it soon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Remoned me of my faith in a different context, 19 Jan 2014
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My family is religious. My father was a scientist and mother a nurse, and both were academics at certain points in their working lives. This book reminded me of that environment I grew up in and the world I now work in. I feel that the concepts explored here, will be a guide for any student struggling with purpose, path and profession. Up until the point, I am sad to say work has come first, but even before I finished this book, I've made more efforts to spend time with more family and friends, and look at my purpose in life. Great book
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5.0 out of 5 stars Life Changing Theories, 22 Dec 2013
This review is from: How Will You Measure Your Life? (Hardcover)
It's not a big secret that professor Christensen is one of the most smartest people on Earth. At least in business world. Amazing book. Valuable theories, which could be applied right away after some (sometimes long-lasting though) contemplations. Life changing ideas in the book. Highly recommended to anyone from parents to CEOs. Thank you.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good reading!, 10 Nov 2013
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Does lead you to reflect about your goals at your career and at your own life. Great insights, inteligent considerations, easy and pleasant reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, 31 Oct 2013
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Written for ambitious over-achievers who forget about what's really important in life... I'm the opposite but I still enjoyed reading it!
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3.0 out of 5 stars another book to read, 23 Oct 2013
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This book provided some good, concise business insights, however I think the personal life side was a little weak. Although to author makes it clear he's a religious man and he references god a lot, he does not preach - which is a good thing. all in all an ok book
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3.0 out of 5 stars Half measure, 28 Aug 2013
By 
Stephen Green (Uttoxeter, Staffs. UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: How Will You Measure Your Life? (Hardcover)
I bought this book having had it on my wish list for some time and thought I was in for a real treat as I began reading the early pages. Here was somebody of talent and proven ability (assuming Harvard are still recruiting top people) who writes in a friendly down to earth way, with words that are accessible to us mere mortals. He told a tale of his university reunions where gradually the lives of these gifted people began tailing off, after early career and material success. An Enron executive, one of his contemporaries went to jail, something apparently unrecognisable from his early character. Others had failed marriages and ruined relationships with their children. The author says that the book is co-written by a talented hi-flying Australian called James Allworth and Karen Dillon "one of the world's most inspiring women". The author reveals that he is suffering from a rare type of cancer that prematurely ended his father's life. The author says that he is going to deliver an explanation of how high-fliers get derailed and fail to live up to their promise or leave a great legacy. With the life he has lived I awaited great wisdom and life experience. The author has written 11 previous books, so with Harper Collins as the publisher as well, what can possibly go wrong?

If you think that the criticisms I am about to make are unfair or unnecessary, let me first say that his is not half the book it could have and should have been. My desire is to lead people to the better authors, the relevant and the worthy and the right choices of whatever the reader is ready for. I want to lead you into further reading and steer you away from what I consider to be wrong choices. However, despite what I am about to write, others will have different views, so make up your own mind. Like a previous reviewer who gave the book 2 stars, I wondered where there was a single word from the co-authors. The main author says the book was written as one voice from 3 contributors but I certainly read it entirely as one man justifying his reign as a great parent and family man who has all the answers for how today's talented young people should bring up their families. He parallels the example of Dell computers outsourcing their manufacturing with "soccer moms" ferrying their children to activities and says that parents shouldn't give their children the rich variety of experiences available today but should keep it in house. Apparently you should also not employ tradespeople but do everything yourself and involve your kids. His mother taught him to darn his socks and he concludes that such values are needed today. I see today's young parents as an inspiration personally but the author is quite convinced that his clumsy analogies between business and family life show the best way.

Thus you young talented people should make the decision to teach your children how they too can make a success of their lives by teaching them sports, pastimes and music in the claustrophobia of their own homes without mixing with their friends in outside activities and spend quality time unblocking drains with your kids, rather than being an example of achievement for your children to emulate. If it were all about time spent with your family then the unemployed would have great relationships and raise happy successful children. The author never really proposes an opinion of how any balance can be achieved, other than with some very valuable insights about the early development of children. However, this sage advise is crudely nailed together with some superficial observations of business stories analysed with hindsight. He doesn't make any forward predictions, just a broad brush analysis of past company successes and failures. The book is in no way an academic piece. Not a bibliography in sight and just two acknowledgements that other books are also available. I will now just mention a few books Switch: How to change things when change is hard The Compound Effect: Multiplying Your Success One Simple Step at a TimeMake Your Own Good Fortune: How to Seize Opportunities. We can't read all the books, which is why you and I look to other reviews to point us in the right direction.
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How Will You Measure Your Life?
How Will You Measure Your Life? by Karen Dillon (Hardcover - 10 May 2012)
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