Customer Reviews


1,173 Reviews
5 star:
 (613)
4 star:
 (252)
3 star:
 (156)
2 star:
 (105)
1 star:
 (47)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A definite slowing
I think I've benefitted from having re-read the first three books immediately prior to reading Feast. That meant I didn't feel the long wait so much between book 3 and 4. Also, I knew from having read reviews here that the story concentrated on events in and around King's Landing, and that the next book would pick up the other characters. Thus, forearmed (or...
Published on 24 Jun. 2012 by Graeme

versus
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Get the man an editor
I'm afraid this was the point at which my desire to know what happens was overcome by my unwillingness to wade through any more of Martin's otiose and self-indulgent maunderings. Yes, an author needs to know far more about his or her imagined world than ever gets on the page, in order to lend substance and texture, but then you have to choose what actually matters. Martin...
Published 21 months ago by hjd


Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Slow, 29 July 2011
Aftering watching a few episodes of GOT on the TV I went out and purchased the books and could barely put down the first 3, the pace was good the stories twisted and turned and the world came to life.
Then I picked up Crows and for the first time found myself putting down the book to do something more interesting. This seemed to move at such a slow pace, and nothing happened...
It reminded me of other books at this type of stage they have alot of pages alot of dialogue and small stories but when it came down to it 90% could have been ditched and the 10% left would have been a better book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Shame as GRRMartin loses the plot..., 6 Sept. 2012
By 
D. MACKENZIE (london, uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
..and the first 3 books were so good! Game of thrones, clash of kings, storm of swords, were truly epic books that made me believe that, YES, it is true, this is the American 'tolkien'...
ok forget that.
for the forth volume, GRRM has firstly done away with all the characters that you truly want to hear about (so no Tyrian, no Arya, no Dany, no Jon) and given us only weak characters who, frankly, i dont care about atall - Sam, Brienne are probably the best. Its not a good gamble. With these characters - and some new anonymous characters, there is hundreds of pages of nothing. The characters wonder round the kingdom on pointles ,insignificant journeys. The 'missions' if you can call them that, i couldnt understand why Martin was devoting so much time to them. Gone is the fantastic plotting and manuvering of the first 3 books. No battles, no page turning plots, no scandals or plots at all. Very disappointing. Furthermore - the book is the same approximate number of pages as the others, so we have hundreds of pages of insignificant, boring, dull detail to digest.
Its such a pity, the 1st 3 books were fantastic. i have to give this book 1 star, its truly terrible. Where is the editor? obviously by now, Martin is surrounded by yes men who tell him his every word is a work of glory. A true shame. Avoid this dull heap of boredom at all cost.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Feast for Crows, 25 Sept. 2014
By 
Iset (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
A Feast For Crows is a difficult book to review. The series is so enormously popular, and has been reviewed tens of thousands of times, that it feels like everything that could be said has already been said. In addition, George R R Martin’s quality of writing remains so consistent that everything I said about why his style of writing is so sublime in my A Game of Thrones review applies to every subsequent review of his books. So instead of reiterating what's been said before, I’m going to be talking about what A Feast For Crows brings that’s new to the table; and that means discussing plot and characters. I won't be giving spoilers.

A Feast For Crows does seem to be the least popular in what is admittedly a very popular series. I for one noticed that I didn’t enjoy it quite as much as previous books. But why was that? Martin’s quality of writing was just as high as ever, and whilst I briefly considered giving this book a lower rating than the one I have, I have not because in fairness the quality is just as good as ever. The book doesn’t deserve a vastly reduced rating because it is still far better than books I’ve awarded 3 or 4 stars to. I believe I enjoyed the book slightly less due to the characters and the unique nature of the division of A Feast For Crows and A Dance With Dragons. The story is well known by now: Martin found himself with too big a story and rather than split it up halfway through the plot he split it up giving us the full plot for only half of the characters in A Feast For Crows, the rest getting their time in A Dance With Dragons. As a result, A Feast For Crows does have a nagging feeling of being incomplete, because it is. And, as it happens, I think it’s fair to say that the most popular characters' stories are continued in A Dance With Dragons, and not here in A Feast For Crows. Therefore as well as feeling vaguely incomplete we’ve also got a book here where the most popular favourite characters are absent – so I did feel their absence.

In addition, I have a strong suspicion that most of the Big Revelations and Shocking Twists that Martin is infamous for are contained within A Dance With Dragons, and not this one. There are some twists and revelations here – I would say two fairly large revelations, a couple of smaller ones, and one Big Event, as far as significant things happening to characters goes – but it still feels like most of them have been saved for the other half of the cast, in A Dance With Dragons. I did not see the two big reveals in this book coming, however I wasn’t surprised, because they were very in keeping with the characters who arranged them; so they weren’t as impactful on me as the twists of previous books.

So as a result, whilst Martin’s quality of writing came across as just as good as ever, A Feast For Crows does feel like the weakest in the series because it is literally half a story, and our favourite characters, and probably most of the big plot developments, are in A Dance With Dragons. Nevertheless, the standard of writing and quality remains as high as ever, so for me this was still an excellent read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay, 12 Dec. 2013
By 
Matthew Far - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
It suffers having some of the least interesting events and/or characters. Not a lot actually happens in a fairly long book. You keep hoping something will happen, but as events build towards some kind of moderate climax the book ends. Cersei's chapters are a brilliant exception. Again, not a whole lot happens, but it doesn't matter because finally getting a look at her madness, insecurities and driving forces is enough of a treat. I personally find Brienne rather bland- a fine character, but not an interesting one to make POV. Her chapters in particular are a dull trip, seemingly in circles, where I felt like I learnt nothing new. Besides that, finally getting some views from Dorne is nice, although the way they are presented makes it feel like a B-plot regardless of the clear significance of the region. Basically, all the biggest points of interest are in the partly concurrent book that follows this.

I got the feeling this book was something of a filler and way of arranging some of the characters so they are placed (geographically and/or emotionally) appropriately for subsequent events. Sam needs to get to Old Town, and develop a little along the way, Arya needs to be doing her own thing to prepare her for whatever she chooses next (this was sometimes interesting, but again didn't build to anything). Sansa needs to settle into her new role/location in preparation for that region maybe becoming important. Brienne needs to do stuff. Jaime needs to change how he sees Cersei (this point is quite important to be fair, and marks a fairly significant development of his character and identity) and resolve a few things in the Riverlands. Cersei needs to be Cersei. Iron Islanders need to reorder so they might influence later events but while still feeling like a distraction from main events.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slow at times but builds up well, 24 Sept. 2012
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
If you've reached this point you are an avid Song of Ice and Fire fan.

As previously said and it's well documented, this book only features a few of the characters you will know ( the rest wait for you in the next book ). Like it or not, that's how it is. Go into this book open minded ready to meet new characters and only follow the stories of a few others.
Some of these points of view do get boring. It's hard to get behind the Dornish and the particular Iron Islanders as we don't know them. We've built up attachments to the Starks, to Dany and Tyrionn but they don't really feature.

The book is about 750 pages of actual storyline. The first 500 of these do go on a bit and I found I slowed right down reading this book. Like many other readers, after the amazing Storm of Swords, this just seemed slow and meandering. However, STICK WITH IT. The last 250 pages or so are classic Song of Ice and Fire, which bring together lots of what you have just read. Infact it builds and builds nicely and the last few chapters drop some real bombshells.

It's important to also grasp ( if you havn't already ) that the point of view style of narrative is exactly that. Wheras previously it might have been a point of view from how someone witnessed the events, it becomes more political in this book in that it also represents how they interpret the different events or if they are even aware of the events going on. If you havn't read it yet, remember this.

By the time you finish the book you will feel a lot better about it. Yes it goes on at times but the end is rewarding and the cherry on the cake is you then get to start A Dance With Dragons.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The lowpoint in the series so far - hopefully the threads lead somewhere later on, 2 May 2012
By 
AK (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
The fourth part of the series is different in following only some of the characters, the rest having been split off and their story brought back in A Song of Ice and Fire (5) - A Dance With Dragons: Part 1 Dreams and Dust. While it is understandable that the author ran out of space to include them all, this treatment is doubtfully successful at best - especially since the characters chosen here - Jaime and Cersei, Brianne of Tarth, Samwell Tarly, etc. are not of the most vibrant or happening variety.

Most of them have quests to fulfill, with mixed success - and the majority of the book is reading more like a background story, rather than pointing towards some key event. A more ruthless editing may well have shortened the whole to the extent, where one could merge books 4 and 5 into a coherent whole. One now knows more about the feelings of duty and motherly instincts of some of the characters but little else that is likely to change the course of events in later books.

This time the ~900 tightly typed pages are a chore for the first time. I really had the urge to skim through section on several occassions, as there was simply too little happening.

One can only hope that the author gets back to form with A Song of Ice and Fire (5) - A Dance With Dragons: Part 1 Dreams and Dust - not saying that the series is turning into a waste of time but it is getting a bit harder to justify reading thousands of pages, if they are to be filled in this way, especially since the author has successfully demonstrated so far that he can do a lot better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Low point of the series (no spoilers), 11 Dec. 2011
By 
Edward A. Thomson (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Unfortunately every series has to have a low point, this book is probably the lowest point of 'A song of fire and ice'. It isn't all bad but it certainly isn't as strong as the previous book (Storm of swords). I'm guessing that if you've made it this far then you are probably an avid fan of the series, given that you'd have to have read the three previous books which is quite a feat.

After the third book you are quite excited for what will follow, you are expecting fast paced action and a lot more secrets to be revealed. Unfortunately, the opposite seems to happen. The characters wander somewhat aimlessly and never seem to achieve any goal, from memory I can only think of one particular on Essos that made any progress in terms of character development. In terms of secrets I somehow expected more about the Wall and the Others to have been revealed in this book, there is some but I was expecting more. Fortunately there is more revealed in the fifth book but I still feel a bit in the dark about the Others north of the wall. Which is interesting given that they feature in the prologue to the first book in the series. Seems like quite a long build up to reveal what they are, and even by the end of the fifth book I wasn't entirely convinced that I understood what they were or what their goals were.

The fourth book has some plot lines that are concurrent with the fifth book. The fifth book starts before the end of the fourth book but it eventually continues past it. The books were written this as both span a vast number of words. Many characters that you know and love from the first three books have been omitted in the fourth book and only appear in the fifth book. It is my opinion that the fourth book follows some of the more boring characters, or the ones I liked least. Again it was a reason why I was anticipating the fifth book, which is a stronger point of the series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than I expected, 9 Oct. 2011
By 
Alexa (East Sussex, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
After reading some of the reviews on here I thought I would literally be falling asleep reading this book. I was genuinely worried that this book was going to let the entire series down so I started reading expecting it to be awful. However, I actually quite enjoyed the book. I felt it kept up the pace of the previous three books and i particularly enjoyed reading from the points of view of Cerci and Jamie. People have said there wasn't any character development but I really think there was. I think you can see more of the changes in Jamie that you began to see in the last book. Samwell changes and I think Sansa begins to grow up. The only character that I thought stayed the same throughout was Brienne.

At times the story did drag a little and I flicked through the pages wondering how much of the chapter was left. But this was generally during the Chapters that didn't focus on the main characters - I think this was the main flaw of the book. Because Martin has written from lots of characters perspectives there came times when he needed to write about events that weren't happening to these characters. In these cases he wrote one off chapters from random characters that were based either in Dorne or the Iron Islands. I felt this broke the story up a bit and often I didn't really care for the characters and so became bored.

The only other real negative is that the booked ended with quite a lot of cliff hangers and because these characters won't be revisited until the book after next it's going to be ages until we find out their fate.

Despite this, I still want to know what happens in the next book. Arya and Jon were mentioned only a few times and Daenerys not at all so I really interested to read about them. I really enjoyed this book and I can't wait to read the next.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Brace yourself..., 23 Sept. 2011
This review is from: A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (Paperback)
I must confess, I only started reading A Song Of Ice and Fire, AFTER seeing the HBO series. A Game Of Thrones was epic, exciting and powerful; I finished it in a month. So too was Clash Of Kings, closely followed of course by A Storm Of Swords. My expectations were high, so I pressed on with A Feast For Crows. And then it happened...

Almost at once, the quick pace of the series ran head long into a swamp of unnecessary and some-what irrelevant background detail, where characters appeared from nowhere and contribute little at first, and not enough by the end, and where the general mind set just crashed. For instance, the story of Brienne of Tarth. Without spoiling, she embarks on a "quest" to find Sansa Stark. The detail we are given makes her journey agonisingly slow, and at times you toy with the idea of skipping her next chapter, just to prove to yourself that you won't miss much. A shame.

However, I'm being a wee bit too negative. I believe that credit should be given where credit is due. Martin wrote a monster of a book; no wonder it took him 5 years! And one must remember, he prefers to write drama and dialogue as opposed to action and battles, though of course when he does write such scenes then we are rewarded with the same analytical detail that goes into the rest of his writing. In short, the story is a precursor. That is, a precursor to some ultimate climax, which one must assume will happen in his later books. All I can say is hang in there, and wait for the (assumed) ultimate showdown.

I give this book only 3 stars for three reasons. The first, as mentioned, that frankly it is a tough old read which could have done with more editing to keep the momentum flowing. Secondly, after having wadded through 1000 pages of fore-play, you fail to feel satisfied with too many open ends and no apparent way of tying them all together. Finally, on a positive note, the little sideshows he throws in, though they contribute little to the overall story line, can be quite interesting and at the end, shocking and surprising. Overall, however, this book will for me only fall into the "good" category, not the "great" shared by it predecessors.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It slows down considerably, 4 Aug. 2011
"A Feast for Crows" is the fourth book in the saga "A Song of Ice and Fire" written by the very famous George R. R. Martin. This saga appeared in 1996 and nine years after (2005, when this book was published) the story is only roughly half-way. There's still so much to happen...

There isn't much to explain about the story in this novel, because giving out any plot details or overviews would reveal a lot of surprises. Anyway, the speed of events slows, the plot becomes a bit entangled and in the overall not much happens, besides some of the characters start training (for what, it's up to you). Only by the end of the book the pace speeds up somewhat.

However, if you are an avid reader of the saga it's better if you check it out. It's interesting and it's a great book because the incredible amount of information it has, without giving the feeling of infodump. If I had to say more, "A Feast for Crows" is good book to enjoy the different cultures and landscapes in Westeros or in the Free Cities. But that's all, there's not really much happening, because the characters hardly evolve at all (besides a few things which "A Storm of Swords" started) and there's not much war going on.

New factions do arise and start to prepare, but the word "start" is very much in vogue in "A Feast for Crows", so we don't get to see the middle of most things (let alone the end). I would prefer to call the book a period to accumulate energy so in the following books the plot picks up rather more quickly and in a explosive way, but I just hope that George R. R. Martin doesn't overdo it, like a certain someone did (*cough*Robert*cough*Jordan*cough*).

By the way, Martin decided to split the characters between "A Feast for Crows" and "A Dance with Dragons". In "A Feast for Crows" we get to read about the most traditional side of the story, mostly in Westeros. And in "A Dance with Dragons" the more exotic characters and settings are represented.

"A Feast for Crows" is not an overly interesting book, but is essential if you want to know what happens in the following parts of "A Song of Ice and Fire".

Still recommend it, for all it's worth.

Till next time,
M.I.T.H. (ManInsideTheHelm)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4)
A Feast for Crows (Reissue) (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) by George R. R. Martin (Paperback - 1 Sept. 2011)
£3.85
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews