Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

22
4.3 out of 5 stars
Earth Star (Earth Girl Trilogy 2)
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£6.39+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 2 September 2013
This anticipated sequel to Edwards' highly successful debut YA science fiction Earth Girl, recently hit the bookshelves and I scooped up a Kindle copy. Would it live up to the high standard set by the first book in this entertaining and original series?

This interesting concept is braided into the idea that Earth is now a backwater, largely inhabited by those unable to survive on other planets, and large tracts are now deserted and falling into ruin. But as a great deal of knowledge has also been lost in the social upheaval engendered by the flight to new planets, archaeologists from all the colony worlds congregate in the race to discover some of the scientific advancements now denied to humanity. It's a cool twist - the world that comes closest to this idea is Eric Brown's fabulous depiction of Paris in Engineman, which I think is one of the best slices of world-building I've ever read...

In addition, the story in Earth Star is pacy, event-filled and engrossing such that I didn't put the book down until I'd finished. Jarra's adventures in Earth Girl were exciting enough - but everything moves up a gear in this second book, when an alien spaceship appears. This being Edwards, of course, this often-covered science fiction plot device doesn't settle into any sort of generic tale, but is given an extra twist. Jarra is pitchforked right into the middle of the action, along with her boyfriend. And before you roll your eyes at the notion of a teenage girl finding herself right in the middle of a major flap about an incipient alien invasion - there is a solid reason why she is there. And it works, in my opinion.

In amongst all the non-stop action, we also have Jarra's relationship with her boyfriend deepening and her fear of commitment addressed. We meet other interesting characters - and learn a bit more about some of the main protagonists that appeared in Earth Girl. Niggles? Um. No. Not one. I just relaxed into this enjoyable, thoroughly readable book and am very much looking forward to reading the third book in the series to discover what will happen next.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 22 August 2013
I absolutely loved Earth Girl and have been waiting impatiently for this second book. It did not disappoint. Janet Edwards has written another exciting adventure about Jarra and her friends, and I read the entire story during two long train journeys yesterday! Just as with the first book, Jarra is a totally believable heroine. She's strong, independent and likeable, but also has enough realistic flaws as a character for the reader to be able to identify with her. It's a real page-turner of a book with Jarra and Fian bouncing from one incident to another. Dig sites can be dangerous places, and the tension really gets racked up for a few events. I'm now hanging on for book 3 as I need to know what happens next with the sphere, what happens between Fian's parents, what happens between Fian and Jarra, what's going to happen with Petra after the Joth incident... how am I going to wait a year?! Hurry up, Janet Edwards!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 18 August 2013
INITIAL THOUGHTS
With some books I have initial thoughts as I am reading or are about to read the book, so I decided that maybe it would be a good idea to add them to my review. So here are the "initial thoughts" I had when about to and when reading Earth Star.
It feels good to be catching up with Jarra and Fian and their crew but a shame that Jarra is still facing a form of racism as the other students find it difficult accept an "ape" "handicapped" into their midst. Then Jarra and Fian are summoned to join the military" Will this change how people look at Jarra and her race?

MY REVIEW
I really like the cover as I think it goes well and will look brilliant on a bookshelf with the others in the series. I do like books in a series to have a common theme. The cover of this book shows the rain forest where Jarra and Fian end up facing the unknown in attempt to save the world as they know it. Id say the female character on the cover is that of Jarra. Jarra is alone on the cover as that represents how she always feels. You all know by now that I love a good byline and this book has "Only she can save the world" it does fit the situation that Jarra finds herself in several times throughout the book. The font of the title and Author name are also great and look well on the cover too.
So after being awarded the Artemis medal Jarra has even more to prove. Everyone knows she is an "ape" in this book, and as usual Jarra faces name calling and racism just because she was born with a faulty immune system that prevents her from travelling off Earth via the portals. The other "norms"/races see this immune system deficiency as being a "fault" and so see the "apes"/ "handicapped" and inferior and some what useless.
Jarra feels the weight of all this on her shoulders and wants to prove that "apes" are worth something and are as capable as everyone else.
Then something drastic happens . . . .an alien craft is spotted and Jarra and Fian are called on to join the military. It is now their job to help the military solve this "problem".
So that's as much as I wish to tell you as you should seriously read this yourself and discover "things" as they happen.
There's lots of action, drama, suspense, thrills and spills in this book too. I enjoyed the medium pace of the book. It gives you chance to get your head around some of the medical, scientific terms and situations too. There are more complicated situations and terms in this book. Jarra has to face dangers on more than one occasion. An accident which sets off the mechanism of her impact suit, causes Jarra trauma and a trip to a regeneration tank. Then she has to deal with the fear of putting on an impact suit to work in again.
Then there's Jarra and Fian's relationship. Fian's Deltan parents are not keen on their son being in a Two-ing contract with an "ape" like Jarra. There's the Deltan's way of courtship no holding hands let alone sharing a room etc. Fian wants Jarra and himself to wear rings to display to the world their commitment to each other. Wearing a ring is another phobia of Jarra's as she once wore one and ended up almost losing her finger when her impact suit triggered. Jarra finally consents to a ring when she realises how much it really does mean to Fian and ...well the type of rings she chooses for them is fantastically romantic. . . .what those rings are? You'll have to read the book!
So did I enjoy the book? Enjoy is an understatement . . . when can I read the next one?
Would I recommend the book? Yes and I would have to say you do not need to be into aliens etc for this Sci-fi book. It's a great relationship novel too. Would I read another book in this series? I'd read the book in the series now if I could! so YES! Would I read other books not in this series by Janet Edwards? Yes I like the style, pace and descriptive style of Janet Edwards writing.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 9 September 2013
Great sequel to Earth Girl. She is almost too good to be true, but it's an enjoyable read. Don't look for anything too thought provoking. It is light and fluffy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 September 2013
Very good read,the earth has long been abandoned for the stars. the only people left are those that can not travel to the stars because of a faulty gene.the young girl in the story wants to show the so called normal people that she is as good as they are.read the book and see.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 11 November 2013
A really good read in the older style/ theme of science fiction writing that I enjoyed so much when I was much younger than I am now, rather than the magic/ heroic/ fantasy style that tends to dominate today. I read the first book in the series and had to buy this, the second, as soon as I had finished

I believe this may have been written for the younger reader, but the author has created a possible civilisation and lead character that made me feel this was the most enjoyable science fiction novel(s) I have read for a long time.

I am looking forward to the third book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 9 September 2013
Earth Star begins straight after the events of Earth Girl with Jarra being awarded the Artemis, the highest military honour, for her self-sacrificing help during a military rescue. Jarra is an 'ape', 'handicapped' because she cannot portal to other planets in the universe like the rest of the 'norms'. She is confined to Earth and many 'norms' are prejudiced against 'apes', believing them to be stupid and inferior. Jarra proved in Earth Girl that the handicapped are just as capable as norms but even though she's reached her own goals, things haven't settled down. A mysterious sphere has appeared in the Earth's atmosphere and it's intentions are unknown. It is clearly something alien, but whether hostile or friendly, noone knows. Jarra and her 'twoing' partner (i.e. boyfriend) Fian have been drafted into the military to use their knowledge of history to try and figure out where this sphere has come from, who sent it and what it wants but things aren't plain sailing because of Jarra's 'ape' status.

I was hoping that after the immense amount of time and detail dedicated to setting up this series in book one, that book two would have a much faster plot with a lot more things going on; however, this was not the case. An alien sphere is introduced at the beginning of the story and I expected many exciting things to happen but by the end of the book we still hadn't really found out anything about the sphere which was disappointing. Like in Earth Girl, there is a sort of continuous plot strand throughout the book but it moves at a steady, slow pace with no dips or bumps along the way. Small events were described in masses of detail that was really unnecessary, whilst major events were merely glanced over. The plot had much potential but unfortunately I don't think it really fulfilled it and I can't help but feel that this story could've been told with half the amount of the words.

Fian and Jarra's relationship doesn't particularly develop at all in Earth Star. The pair signed up for a 'twoing' contract in Earth Girl so I expected more romance in Earth Star, but really the pair just acted like an old married couple and I really fail to see the 'spark' in their relationship. I still don't really identify with the main character, Jarra, because her personality is hidden behind the fact that she doesn't 'do' emotions, but consequently this meant that I couldn't see in her what all the characters in the book could. Her narrative is quite interesting, but I don't particularly like her as a character or a narrator so I felt a little detached whilst reading this. Jarra was a lot sassier in Earth Girl and I quite enjoyed her snarky bitterness, but I don't think that part of her personality came with her to Earth Star which was a great shame.

The general setting of the book and the universe that these events take place in is fascinating. Janet Edwards has created a completely new world that still has some vague similarities to Earth as we know it, but there are also many differences. A great deal of detail is spent describing the planets, their customs, the tools that are being used, the different social rankings etc. which is all very interesting to read and learn about. Although portalling between planets isn't something new to the sci-fi genre, having 'handicapped' characters who are tied to planet Earth, is. In addition, these characters communicate with a whole new language and I felt a lot like an old lady trying to understand teenage slang when I first started reading this but by the end of this book I was basically fluent in it. I really love the world that Janet Edwards has created for Jarra and all the other characters and the framework that supports this novel is soso good, but unfortunately the plot let the book down.

Although you don't need to read Earth Girl to understand what's going on in Earth Star, I would certainly recommend it. Earth Girl sets up the backdrop for this series with lots of details about the new universe that Janet Edwards has created and there's a lot of new terms which you have to get to grips with in order to understand how the characters speak and act. Any references made to people or events from Earth Girl are thoroughly explained in Earth Star which does slow down the book considerably for those that have already read the first book, but if you're diving in at book two then this will do you fine.

All in all, Earth Star was a bit of a disappointment but it's still a fairly intriguing read. The world that Janet Edwards has created is absolutely superb and I've spent so much time reading her two books over the last few days that I've even adopted some of the new language used in her book, e.g. nardlebrain, but I don't think there's enough of a plot to really bring this world to life. I still have high hopes for the third book in this series which I'm praying will have a plot with a much faster pace with a lot more excitement but we'll just have to wait and see!

http://whats--hot.blogspot.com
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
There is definitely a strong theme of overcoming prejudice that runs through Earth Star more so than its predecessor Earth Girl. At almost every turn Jarra was not just battling her own insecurities but was faced with a universe full of people that for the most part probably view her and those living on Earth as apes.

I have allergies so I must not be human
A ridiculous statement yes, but no more ridiculous than the reality of prejudice itself. When you really stop to think about the reasons behind the prejudices some people have, they all boil down to some such silly nonsense. And for the color of skin, twang to a voice and lack of immunities people are reviled. Treated as less even though they are in every other way just as human and deserving of respect as the next person. Again and again Jarra is the object of prejudice and it was an unfortunate thing to see but necessary to the plot.

I wanna push you around, I wanna push you down
Yes, I sang that in my head as I typed it. If you don’t know the band Matchbox 20 then I can’t help you. I was glad to see that Jarra and Fian had a much more developed relationship in this book. Of course they’d have to now that they’ve been through so much together and are actually a couple. Their playful banter and how Fian literally likes being pushed around by Jarra was cute. I don’t know how other readers might take this but I adored their relationship. They are in that early phase of infatuation with each other and yet oddly enough they seem to know one another fairly well given the short amount of time that has actually passed. I found it refreshing to see how things between them have developed and I liked that Fian wasn’t such a secondary character anymore. I have to say Earth Star also had a touch of nostalgia in it for me. It was great the way Earth’s history, our not too far ago history infact, was woven into the story right along next to the fictional / futuristic history that the author created – all culminating in this fascinating far off future. The amazing things described made me wonder just how far off this future actually is. What with genetically created plants, recovered extinct animal species, medical regrowth tanks and teleporters. The wealth of nifty science fiction treats had me barely coming up for air between pages. Now mix in the sci-fi alien technology and it was a one sitting read.

Perception is 9 / 10ths of the law
Jarra has some really great things going for her as a character. She is curious and prone to getting into trouble, a victim of her own prejudices as well as those of others and hates talking about her feelings or anything even remotely emotional to a fault. She’s also really smart in her field of historical study, and did I mention she brings a whole new meaning to the word stubborn? Fian claims he is stubborn, but he doesn’t have anything on Jarra. hah! Anyways where am I going with this? So typically in young adult books you’ll get introduced to that YA main character that is going to be the ‘savior’ or ‘hero’ in the book. Did that happen here? Of course it did – however the author did it right because she gives realistic and justifiable reasons for why Jarra is put into these situations. There are valid points to why Jarra is specifically chosen for these opportunities and why she more than anyone else is the best person for the job. Because of the way it was done and how the circumstances were always explained the reader was not constantly being asked to suspend their disbelief. That to me was what helped me enjoy Earth Star more than many other YA books and makes it well worth reading.

*note about the hardcover edition – the font is a bit small. Those who like bigger fonts might want to grab the e-copy instead.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The students of University Asgard's Pre-History Foundation course are returning to Earth after a short break. Except for Jarra, who cannot leave due to her faulty immune system, and her twoing partner, Fian. They are moving from New York to the Eden dig site in Africa to continue their studies at Earth's last new city. Surrounded by reclaimed rainforest, this site poses a whole new set of risks but Jarra and Fian are called away suddenly by the military; the Alien Contact programme has been activated.

I was quite excited when I started reading this and the alien sphere lurking above Earth was revealed. It could go two ways, destruction of planet earth or new found friends (was anyone else thinking they could be the key to a cure for the handicapped?). However the sphere isn't doing much of anything and the military gather experts from all fields to work out what the risk of attack is. And what on Earth they should do about it. Literally on Earth, which has its own special problems. They can't just evacuate the planet because the handicapped can't leave, Jarra among them. Whilst some think the handicapped are an acceptable loss, the military is fortunately on Jarra's side.

The realism maybe cuts down on the tension. It's believable that there would be quiet times and it's sensible for Jarra to return to normal life in-between things happening, but this is fiction and it takes away from the pace. This isn't a race against time alien invasion but an archaeological adventure as before. And as we all know, archaeology done well takes time. I still enjoyed the history in the future aspect and the excavation scenes are oddly gripping. Earth has turned against humanity and the once safe cities are now death-traps. So moving some debris can be a life or death situation.

In the first book it felt a lot more like the world was against Jarra but now everything seems to fall in her lap. Things were just solved a little too simply in many ways, however I was very glad during a certain scene in the hospital where Fian veered her away from a stupid life choice. Which might have seemed like the perfect solution to her. Maybe the easy solutions were to contrast Jarra's dramatics and over-thinking. She worries about something, but as soon as it stops being Jarra against the world and she trusts someone, things turn out to be easy.

There were some lovely scenes with the supporting characters and I loved the new locations on Earth. Especially Jarra's brief visit to the pyramids. Do we meet aliens? Well that would be telling but one thing, the end will make you wish the next book was here right now. Bring on the future.

Review copy provided by publisher.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 5 September 2013
Love the sequel to Earth Girl. This is a little more grown up. Great read. Defo recommend this book. Thanks
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Earth Girl (Earth Girl Trilogy 1)
Earth Girl (Earth Girl Trilogy 1) by Janet Edwards (Paperback - 16 Aug. 2012)
£7.99

Earth Flight (Earth Girl Trilogy 3)
Earth Flight (Earth Girl Trilogy 3) by Janet Edwards (Paperback - 14 Aug. 2014)
£7.99

Resist: Breathe 2
Resist: Breathe 2 by Sarah Crossan (Paperback - 10 Oct. 2013)
£4.95
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.