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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Series so far................
This is the third book in the Odd Thomas series.The first was Odd Thomas and the second book was Forever Odd.If you haven't read the previous books, it is worth reading them, though not absolutely imperative.

If you have read the reviews by other people of the previous 2 books, then you get a feel of readers' disappointment with this series, and a lot of the...
Published on 17 Jan. 2007 by Mr. S. W. Steel

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars My 100-word book review
Brother Odd is the third book in Koontz's series, which started with the excellent Odd Thomas, and it is the weakest yet. There are some good touches (I liked the snowbound monastery and found the monstrous apparitions intriguing) but the novel is let down by a poor plot, has an unsatisfactory resolution and on occasion Koontz's trademark humour gets in the way. There is...
Published on 24 Mar. 2007 by A. J. Cull


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Series so far................, 17 Jan. 2007
By 
Mr. S. W. Steel "stephensteel" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brother Odd (Hardcover)
This is the third book in the Odd Thomas series.The first was Odd Thomas and the second book was Forever Odd.If you haven't read the previous books, it is worth reading them, though not absolutely imperative.

If you have read the reviews by other people of the previous 2 books, then you get a feel of readers' disappointment with this series, and a lot of the comments made are valid i.e. the lead character is not as engaging as Christopher Snow from Fear Nothing and Seize the night, and there is too little action in the books.I personally disliked the second book intensely - it was overlong,over descriptive and not engaging enough, and i wasn't really that eager to buy this book.However, i did and here are my views on it........

This is much better than the first two books (thankfully) and well worth a read.I really enjoyed the setting of the novel - an isolated, snowbound monastery.I also enjoyed the characters that Odd deals with - nuns, and monks with interesting pasts, and quirks of character.The book has a bit of mystery to it - who is causing all the strange events surrounding the monastery, what is the reason behind a murder, and why is the belltower haunted too?

I don't want to spoil the plot, or give anything away, but i will say this is pacier than the previous books.It gripped me much quicker, and i kept reading this until the end.The descriptions are much shorter and punchier.The plot is better too.

So all in all, a very good Koontz book BUT a long way from his best in my opinion.His earlier books are still his best, and i am still desperate for another Christopher Snow book.Brother Odd is the best Koontz book for a while though, and definitely the best in the series.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars My 100-word book review, 24 Mar. 2007
By 
A. J. Cull (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Brother Odd is the third book in Koontz's series, which started with the excellent Odd Thomas, and it is the weakest yet. There are some good touches (I liked the snowbound monastery and found the monstrous apparitions intriguing) but the novel is let down by a poor plot, has an unsatisfactory resolution and on occasion Koontz's trademark humour gets in the way. There is also some rather heavy-handed moralising, which seems out of character for Odd. A shame really, as the premise underlying these stories is a good one. I hope the fourth book will mark a return to form.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than expected!, 24 Feb. 2007
By 
marky77 (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Brother Odd (Hardcover)
Brother Odd is a very good adition to the Odd Thomas series - better than Forever Odd and just about on level with Odd Thomas.

At first I was a bit dissapointed at this new installment of the series as it was quite slowly paced but after a hundered pages or so it picks up and by 150-200 pages it is very addictive and suspencefull, plus, of course, it features Odd Thomas, a Koontz charactor we have all come to know and love. These things combine to make the perfect mix for another Dean Koontz masterpeice - and once again the auther delivers as promised.

The book takes place a few months after Forever Odd left off. Odd is now in the monastery (mentioned in the blurb and in the ending of Forever Odd) living with the nuns and monks (even though they are monks and nuns they still have good senses of humour and the sparkling personality's of a true Dean Koontz charactor) and a dog named Boo. Plus, of course, the ghost of Elvis Presely. But as usual he must use his "gift" - along with his loveable sence of humour - to solve the mysteries of the death of a monk as well as strange seemingly supernatural creature around the monastery.

Brother Odd combines mystery and chilling suspence with laugh-out-loud humour. I would highly recomend this book to anybody (unless they have not read Odd Thomas and Forever Odd in which case please do) especially if they are a fan of Dean Koontz or of the previous two books in the series.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than expected!, 9 July 2007
By 
marky77 (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Brother Odd is a very good adition to the Odd Thomas series - better than Forever Odd and just about on level with Odd Thomas.

At first I was a bit dissapointed at this new installment of the series as it was quite slowly paced but after a hundered pages or so it picks up and by 150-200 pages it is very addictive and suspencefull, plus, of course, it features Odd Thomas, a Koontz charactor we have all come to know and love. These things combine to make the perfect mix for another Dean Koontz masterpeice - and once again the auther delivers as promised.

The book takes place a few months after Forever Odd left off. Odd is now in the monastery (mentioned in the blurb and in the ending of Forever Odd) living with the nuns and monks (even though they are monks and nuns they still have good senses of humour and the sparkling personality's of a true Dean Koontz charactor) and a dog named Boo. Plus, of course, the ghost of Elvis Presely. But as usual he must use his "gift" - along with his loveable sence of humour - to solve the mysteries of the death of a monk as well as strange seemingly supernatural creature around the monastery.

Brother Odd combines mystery and chilling suspence with laugh-out-loud humour. I would highly recomend this book to anybody (unless they have not read Odd Thomas and Forever Odd in which case please do) especially if they are a fan of Dean Koontz or of the previous two books in the series.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Title pretty much gives it away, 16 May 2008
Odd indeed--the entire series from Koontz. If you're new to this author, he's written a series of books dealing with this character, ODD THOMAS. The first book was simply "Odd Thomas," followed by "Forever Odd."

Now, this one, "Brother Odd," is a faster paced book than the first two, and those pretty well flew. The first two were simply fantastic in my opinion, though I did read them a while ago. It's no wonder Koontz stays on the bestseller lists with his accessible but literary works, and ODD THOMAS is the perfect book, touching the heart and making you laugh at the same time.

The setting of this latest Koontz page-turner is a snowbound monestary, reminding me a little of "The Shining" though the edge and material given the situation is handled with more sophistication and elegance. Yet at the same time Koontz gives us a gritty piece of fiction, not shying away from situations that might be ruined the hands of other authors.

As usual, there's a parade of other "Odd" characters in this books, and while it fits into the series well, it can still be read by itself without the background of the first two books. I liked this book almost as much as two others I recently came across, "The Charming Man" and "Barring Some Unforeseen Accident," both of which were EXTREMELY entertaining, the first being more romance oriented and the second being a sort of mystery.

For those who haven't read any Koontz, feel free to dive right in--you don't have to read these books in a series and they're all entertaining. Cheers!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars downhill..., 13 Mar. 2008
I loved the 1st in the series and bore with the second, as I rated the character Odd so much. The first two made me cry, aswell as read in one sitting, although I preferred the 1st by a mile and awaited the 3rd thinking it would overcome the 2nd novel-2nd album syndrome. As for Brother Odd, sorry to say I started to really dislike the character so much that he gave me mental italics. This book was a real letdown. The plot was gossamer thin, and the sweet simple personality of the protagonist felt cloyingly annoying and 2D. Not to mention the loss of Elvis himself.. the one point in the book which may have had some poignancy, if left alone, was quickly ruined by the appearance of none less than Sinatra. (I'm sure Odd was meant to be lacking in the ego department? Why not some anonymous soul?)
That said, I will buy the 4th book, hoping to find some remnance of the promise of the first and not something that feels like a contractual obligation and insult to readers integrity.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A diminished return, 14 Mar. 2007
This review is from: Brother Odd (Hardcover)
Brother Odd is the third of Koontz's "Odd Thomas" books and unfortunately it is a prime example Ever Decreasing Sequel rule; the first book was a brilliant and charming thriller, the second was action packed but ultimately a little less charming and the third is slow and a little boring. Its still an "Odd" book, however, with the same humour and tragedy, and if anything Koontz's actual writing is better and peppered with some truely classic lines ("Humanity is a parade of fools and I am at the front of it, twirling a baton"). The problem lies in the story, like "Forever Odd" it takes place within a 24 hour timeline but the subject matter was a little too silly (and obvious), plus the pacing, with far too many slow moments, way off. Slight spoler alert: I had hoped that Koontz would draw a line under Odd's journey with a proper conclusion to this book but its again left open ended - I dont think I'll be reading any more of his adventures though. One last thing...it suddenly occurred to me where I recognised Odds character from...he reminds me a bit of Marcie from Charlie Brown when she calls Peppermind Patty "Sir". Just thought I'd share that.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much better than number 2!, 16 Dec. 2009
I'm not a fan of Dean Koontz in general. I've read a few of his horrors and found them okay. Nothing really stays with me, or really scares me.
I liked Odd Thomas. In fact, it's probably one of my favourite books. Odd's wonderful turn of phrase, his bizarre neighbours, his ability to see the dead, all things that combine with a cracking story to make a thrilling read. And it's rare that a book makes me cry, really cry - and Odd Thomas was one of those books where you turn the page hoping and praying that the author isn't actually doing what you think he is.
It was Odd Thomas that kept me going through the second book. And I got the third, Brother Odd on a whim. And I'm glad I did.
For me, Dean Koontz's writing was poetry at times. Tragic and tender and dark. Odd is staying in a monastery to take a break and reflect. During his time there, there is a suicide and a murder and Odd feels honour bound to help solve the crime and protect the monks and nuns around him. To further complicate matters, the ajoining abbey has a respite home for children with disabilities and Odd discovers that some children have the ability to allow the dead to communicate. The person contacting him both exhilarates and drives him to despair.
One of my friends thought this was an attempt at sci fi, but I think this novel goes some way to explain the nature of god, as Odd sees it anyway. And it's a dark book, unusually scary - I kept both lamps on!
So, even if the prior novel wasn't your cup of tea, Brother Odd was a cracker and I'm keeping my fingers crossed the next is as good.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Characterisation, but wavery plotting, 11 Feb. 2007
This review is from: Brother Odd (Hardcover)
Dean Koontz is at his best when allowed to explore his playful side as seen in novels such as 'Life Expectancy' and 'Velocity.' The Odd Trilogy; Odd Thomas, Forever Odd, and now Brother Odd, embodies the best of Dean Koontz's trademarks; the characters, even the secondary ones, are loveable eccentrics that it's easy to care for, the narrator is self effacing, and moral with a wry sense of humour.

If you've read the previous books in this trilogy and enjoyed them then there will certainly be enough here to keep them entertained. If you haven't had an introduction to Odd Thomas then really you only need to read the first book to catch up, I don't think Forever Odd's events are referenced once here.

Odd Thomas leaves the safety of Pico Mundo for a monastery to gain some reflective time away from the needy and newly dead. Unfortunately, trouble as always follows him. When Odd notices bodarchs (the nasty etheral spirits that congregate before violent death and destruction)swarming around the monastery, he is understandably concerned, for it is home not just to nuns and monks, but many disabled and special needs children.

Odd is as ever the most likeable of narrators and his conversational tangents whilst not always relevant are amusing enough not to distract from the narrative. This installment is pacier than Forever Odd and perhaps truer in spirit to the Original Odd Thomas, but it does suffer from some flaws. The eccentric characters are fantastic and Koontz could give a masterclass in writing conflict within dialogue and creating short snapshots of characters.

However, despite the atmospheric snow storm that dogs the book, we never really have a true sense of a siege situation with all the tension that it should instill. The menace of the mysterious creatures out in the snowstorm is dilluted by the repeated references that they seem more mechanical than supernatural. Also with no definite villain to work against the climax of the novel goes out with a whimper rather than a bang.

When the mystery is finally revealed it is dealt with too swiftly to be satisfying. By rights this should be a two or three star novel because of the weak plotting but when Koontz can create an ex-hitman monk and make Brother Knuckles seem not only plausible but very likeable who am I to complain.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable entry into the Odd Thomas series., 25 Mar. 2015
By 
FallenGrace (UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Brother Odd (Kindle Edition)
Brother Odd is book three in this Dean Koontz series, if you haven't, you should definitely read these two first:

1 - Odd Thomas.
2 - Forever Odd.

Brother Odd continues a little bit later from it's predecessor with Odd Thomas, a unique young man who can see ghosts staying as a guest at a monastery. He is there trying to retreat from the world after tragic events affected him so deeply. The monastery is not quite what it seems though and when Odd stumbles onto an unconscious monk in the snow and is then attacked he does his best to uncover what is going on.

The start of this book is kind of slow, doesn't feel all too engaging and at moments here and there feels a little pretentious in Koontz's descriptions. Before long though the book does pick up, the location is great, some of the characters were really interesting and I especially loved the interactions between Odd and another monastery guest, an enigmatic Russian, those moments put a real smile on my face.

Overall if you have enjoyed the Odd Thomas series so far, I suspect you may also enjoy this one. It has some pacing issues still like Forever Odd but is an enjoyable read by the end.

Recommended.

+ Nice story location.
+ Some good character interactions.
+ Interesting adversaries.

- Takes a while to get going.
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Brother Odd (Odd Thomas 3)
Brother Odd (Odd Thomas 3) by Dean Koontz (Paperback - 3 Jan. 2013)
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