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4.1 out of 5 stars461
4.1 out of 5 stars
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on 22 October 2012
Cecelia Ahern does it again. I have been a big fan of this author since I read her first book years ago. Since then, she has written many more and had films made from her stories. One Hundred Names is a typical Ahern book and by typical, I mean that it is funny, sad and heart-warming with a bit of magic thrown in.
The story follows Kitty Logan, a journalist whose name is mud, thanks to her falsely accusing an innocent man on TV. Her boss is ill with cancer and Kitty asks her what story she wanted to write but never got round to and her boss presents her with a list of 100 names. Kitty then sets off to find these 100 people to interview and find out their stories.
This all leads to a funny set of people and situations and these all make the story what it is ......heart-warming. The characters are clearly presented and they all have very individual characters that will keep you interested all the way through.
I enjoyed reading this over a weekend and as I had the Kindle version, the print is not tiny and easy to read. The only reason that I didn't give this book 5 stars is because I am comparing it to her other books, some of which I prefer, but as a stand-alone read, this is great and a really good introduction to Ahern's writing.
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on 13 September 2013
I'm sorry to say this but this was one of the most dull books that I have read in ages. I love Cecelia Ahern's books and normally can't put them down but this was one terrible...it was a non-story!! This should be in the free books....definitely not worth the £4.99 I paid for it
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VINE VOICEon 24 August 2012
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I started this book with high hopes. Although I had never previously read a novel by Cecelia Ahern, I know she has many fans, and that all her previous books have been massive bestsellers. Sure enough, I quickly found myself drawn in to this story and firmly on the side of Kitty Logan, a journalist whose name is mud, thanks to her falsely accusing an innocent man on TV.

Thankfully, she still has one ally - Constance Dubois, her former boss and mentor, who is now sadly in hospital, ravaged with cancer. Constance tells Kitty that there was one news story she wished she had had time to write, and asks Kitty to track down the file. Inside the file is a list of one hundred names - none of which are familiar to Kitty. Maybe following up Constance's story will lead Kitty to redemption...

I think this is a great idea for a book and initially I enjoyed Kitty's attempts to make sense of the puzzle of names. However, I found that by introducing so many characters to the plot meant that it became very fragmented. I felt that the author handled each character's story in a rather clunky way too - no sooner had they met Kitty than they would launch into great long speeches about themselves. Not very realistic! I also found the end few chapters very cheesy and twee, and the writing seemed rushed as the author approached the finale. Sorry - this section of the book really didn't convince me.

Overall, I'm glad I read it. Ahern has a lovely writing style, she is funny and observant, but I felt she tried to pack too much into this one story, and I was left feeling disappointed.
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on 16 November 2012
I usually love Cecilia aherns books but this one is so disappointing. its the type of book where you want something to happen and it never really does.The best thing about this book is the cover design.
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on 3 January 2013
always very keen to read her books as i love the imagination and magic behind each one. this however had no magic and i was left wondering whether or not to even finish it. i am not one to give up on an author i have loved every book from so i carried on but was dissapointed by the average plot. i soon discovered the link between characters.
please bring back the magic!
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on 18 August 2013
I am well over half way through this and am having to force myself to continue reading it, the storyline is very slow to unfold and frankly I find it boring, think I will give up now, there are better and more interesting books I could be reading. Enjoyed books by this author before but not this one.
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VINE VOICEon 4 September 2012
Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Kitty Logan, a journalist, is in a bit of a pickle. Her life has reached an all time low exacerbated by the recent death of her best friend and mentor. Her mentor leaves her a final challenge (or is it a wild goose chase?) - to investigate and write a story about 100 names. Who are "the names" and what are their stories?

I liked this story as it drew you in from the beginning. Its setting in Ireland leads to some very twee descriptions and the story develops gently, meeting some interesting characters on the way. Perhaps a little involved for a beach read, due to the number of characters involved, but it would be a lovely book to curl up by the fire with!
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on 31 October 2012
A pretty standard Cecelia Ahern novel, and pleasant enough to read, yet the plot lacked any real magic or surpise. I've read all of Ahern's novels so far and usually really like her unusual angles, for example I really enjoyed the concept of 'meeting your life' in her last novel. However 'One Hundred Names' lacked any of this charm and struck me as being a bit fluffy, overly sweet and wholly unremarkable...not to mention very predictable. It felt a bit like Ahern is writing by numbers. That said, it was easy to read and it passed the time on my commute to work, so worth a read if you are a fan of her previous stuff, but overall my least favourite of her novels to date.
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on 14 June 2013
I am major Cecelia fan! Read all her books, But I wouldn't really recommend this book to anyone, loved all her other books.. My ultimate favourite was If you could see me now, i also adore the book of tomorrow, the gift and thanks for the memories, great imagination and unique story's. However one hundred names was totally predictable, unimaginative (compared to her other books) and generally disappointing, no surprises or twists or plots??.!! Wouldn't stop me reading her other books in the future but it pains me to say found this one a drag and difficult to read to the end :-(
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Format: Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Cecelia Ahern, much loved author from County Dublin, having nine successful novels to her credit; has so far cruised around under my reading radar -I know she has her devoted fans who will all be delighted to see another book arriving. They will be used to her individual style; it was new to me.

Frustratingly I found ' One Hundred Names' tricky to settle into. It is heavily populated with numerous bit part players briefly introduced, each bringing along a short CV, new snappy resumes clamouring for the confused reader to try and hold on to. Our flawed `heroine' is Kitty/ Katherine Logan, an apparently failing to engage brain before opening mouth type; a whiny, `Why Me?' self-centred TV journalist who also writes for a quirky magazine called `Etcetera' set up by her old friends and mentors Constance and husband Bob. She is shown to be all too frail and human, making her real and recognisable if less than likeable; it is the lessons she has to learn that makes you go on reading.

So, initially anyway, hard to take to, Kitty does have a handful of loyal friends who try to help; some of them have mixed motives. When we meet her when she is going through a humiliatingly public shaming - cast out into the wilderness after being gullibly tricked into running a TV expose on a popular school sports teacher Colin Maguire who is accused of child abuse. His life was smashed up when she hastily named and shamed him on the basis of seemingly misleading information supplied by women with a grudge. The ensuing court case cleared him and landed her employers with a massive compensation bill. No one thinks much of Kitty after that disaster; her boyfriend ships out, and she becomes persona non grata in the workplace, as well as having to endure a hate campaign directed at her rented home, one ghastly thing after another being thrown into her doorway there. I couldn't help wondering if she was actually right after all; the thread of this back story does tantalisingly spin through the chapters. All is neatly resolved eventually.

What may be Kitty's salvation is a mysterious legacy from Constance, a sheet of paper with a list of one hundred, neatly numbered, names. This should have been Constance's last story, her carefully planned triumph, and a knock out piece. Sadly Constance's life ends before she can get to grips with it. It is the link between these varied folk that should hold the key to the scoop sensation. Gradually Kitty begins to track them down and to interview them. Each one has a certain something special that she must try and winkle out. Her editor allows one last stab at a story - the copy must be filed shortly. Road to Damascus type revelations begin to shine on Kitty and the reader can at last warm to her more, something that took a bit too long for my impatient thought processes. Dazzling with dense dizzy detail, it's hard work sorting the wheat from the chaff but there is a road to resolution and redemption.

The writing is hectic and shows no mercy. If you like to get to know just a few characters really well you would find this irritating. Otherwise go with the flow and let it all pass by your eyes while grasping tightly on to the twisty turning, sometimes chaotic, winding way of a loose, many stranded idea that engagingly shows a whole load of magnificent understated goodness simmering away under apparently ordinary lives.
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