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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sky's the Limit - A Sky fans review
As a Team Sky fan, Richard Moore's latest publication was eagerly anticipated. An esteemed writer and cycling blogger, Moore's previous offerings, the excellent `In Search of Robert Millar' and `Heroes, Villains and Velodromes' have set the bar high. 'Sky's the Limit' does not disappoint.

Although Moore appears to have been granted unprecedented access from day...
Published on 11 Jun 2011 by teamskyfans.com

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars okay, bit dull, one for the cyclists
It's a rather dry recap of the last few years. No new insights. Makes Sky sound very robotic, no emotion, still can't get excited about this team. Brilliant results for the Brits though of course, simply fantastic. But oh so dull. This book passed a bit of time, if you're not into pro cycling though you will fall asleep. It seems that Sky's success was simply due to much...
Published 23 months ago by Sydneysider


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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not enough cycling!, 31 July 2011
By 
Nigel Seel (Wells, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Sky's the Limit: British Cycling's Quest to Conquer the Tour de France (Hardcover)
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Had Bradley Wiggins not fallen off his bike and broken his collar bone in the first week of the Tour de France this year, and had instead finished on the podium in Paris, then this book would be flying off the shelves now. Without Wiggins bidding for glory as team leader the presence of the remaining Sky squad roused little interest, so why the book? It appears to have been written at the behest of Sky as part of their promotional push - a "How To" manual in the expectation of a success which has so far eluded them.

Author Richard Moore appears to have had access to the team during its first year and the resultant book suffers mightily from quoting at length the aspirations of management. The revolutionary philosophy of managing the team as a team rather than as a collection of gifted individuals is espoused repeatedly, but from the post-Tour viewpoint this now looks fragilely Wiggins-centric.

The intention was that methods tested and proven successful by team "British Cycling" in track cycling, with spectacular results in the Olympics, could be directly incorporated into the training and development of British road cycling with the five year goal of winning a podium place in the Tour de France. The plan for Team Sky was to build on young British talent which would be nurtured and forced to think and act as a unit, in contrast to the perceived individualism of most European cycling teams.

Another big idea and challenge thrown down by Sky was that they could win the Tour without doping, and on this crucial issue the book is quite revealing. A stated objective was that no suspicion of doping would be tolerated ... but then a team member is accused of it. His denial is accepted by management but the policy of complete-intolerance of drugs is recognised as being problematic. meanwhile the success of Lance Armstrong, seven times winner of the Tour, is admired and analysed; his ability to avoid crashes by strong team support at the front of the Peloton (the main group) is recognised as crucial to his strategy but the accusations which have dogged Armstrong's career - that his performance owes something to drugs - is not really aired here in the context of his success. The end of the 2010 racing calendar is marked by a change of tone on the doping issue: "... where the line is - between what's allowed and what isn't - in cycling can sometimes be a bit blurred," says Dave Brailsford (Team Sky principal), p. 295.

Had this book be written as the culmination of Tour success for Sky, and had the team's revolutionary ethos and the cycling itself been more central to the plot, then the author would have been well-placed to give his readers a close up view of what is possible in this much-loved sport. Unfortunately, without these two ingredients the book is hard-going and lacks the joy of the struggle that is the essence of the Tour.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another good review, 7 Oct 2011
This review is from: Sky's the Limit: British Cycling's Quest to Conquer the Tour de France (Hardcover)
Very good service, pleased with prompt reply and postage. have used Amazon a lot and have not been let down.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vivé la tour!!!, 21 Aug 2011
By 
FLB (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Sky's the Limit: British Cycling's Quest to Conquer the Tour de France (Hardcover)
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This is a fantastic book, with the resurgence of cycling in the UK and Mark Cavendish's fantastic Green Jersey efforts, If you want to know how to go about creating an assault on cyclings greatest race and I have no doubt they will do it soon, from the efforts taken in selecting a rider to minor changes to the bike that can knock of a tenth of a second. A testament to British efforts in this sport that has had far too many controversies recently. A great buy for anyone who loves this sport.
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 6 Nov 2011
This review is from: Sky's the Limit: British Cycling's Quest to Conquer the Tour de France (Hardcover)
A good story, and a testament to David Brailsford and his employees' hard work in establishing a world class team in a short time. It is therefore a pity that the author has chosen to garnish his text with swearing and bad language in every chapter. Anglo-Saxon expletives may be the lingua franca of the peloton, or indeed any workplace, but including such words in the text is poor. Any worthwhile writer should be able to get his message across without such words, and including them is like taking drugs to win races - cheating. Similarly making comparisons with, and taking analogies from, football and its personalities detracts from the story. Use the odd one or two by all means, but constant references to Man Utd and Alex Ferguson for example indicate a limited imagination. I'm pleased I only paid £9 and not the cover price. I am unlikely to read it again, and certainly wouldn't recommend it to anyone else. I think my best bet is to lend it to someone and hope they don't return it.
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