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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jack Higgins
Jack Higgins is one of my husband's favourite authors. Makes excellent reading... must do if he reads a book while having a bath. Highly recommended!
Published on 20 Nov 2010 by S B DEMPSTER

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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A rather pointless exercise
This is the sequel to "A Darker Place", which itself wasn't published that long ago. The jacket blurb/plot summary provided above is actually quite misleading. The Russians decide to assassinate most of the members of General Ferguson's team and all this action happens within the first 50 or so pages. The rest of the book is the story of how the attacks were planned,...
Published on 23 Sep 2009 by Giles Allison


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A rather pointless exercise, 23 Sep 2009
By 
Giles Allison (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) (Hardcover)
This is the sequel to "A Darker Place", which itself wasn't published that long ago. The jacket blurb/plot summary provided above is actually quite misleading. The Russians decide to assassinate most of the members of General Ferguson's team and all this action happens within the first 50 or so pages. The rest of the book is the story of how the attacks were planned, told in flashback. Within this flashback is another flashback which explains the life story of Daniel Holley, the ex-IRA arms runner (i.e. Dillon #2) who the Kremlin tasks with arranging the executions. Consequently, Dillon & co don't feature at all in the majority of the book and there is no Ferguson-led "hunt" for the perpetrators, the fate of all of whom we know by page 50. Anyone expecting the violent deaths of half the team followed by Dillon ruthlessly hunting down those responsible for the rest of the book (and I had hoped) will be disappointed.

Why Mr Higgins decided to structure the book this way is anyone's guess. By having the attacks first and then their background told in flashback, the author robs the book of any real tension and excitement - we know what the outcome of those attacks is (I won't reveal it, but have a guess...) so there is little drama in reading about how they were planned. Holley's back story is Higgins' standard "good guy witnesses something ghastly and so joins the IRA for revenge" template. He is essentially a new Sean Dillon and one wonders whether this book is designed to introduce him up for new adventures. I noted that this time the American president isn't named and there is a hint that Jake Cazelet has finally left office. Other details remain the same as before - everyone spends large amounts of time wearing Zeiss glasses and drinking champagne.

The attacks on Ferguson & co should have been tagged on to the end of "A Darker Place" and the rest of the story dispensed with; maybe that was the original intention before someone suggested spinning it out into a whole new book. I found myself skip-reading the last quarter of the book because it simply wasn't interesting. I kept hoping for a riverting twist in the tale - there is one of sorts, but like most of the denouements in the Sean Dillon series it is all over in the blink of eye and leaves you wondering why it is that all the good guys wear body armour and all the bad guys don't. It's been some years now since Hannah Bernstein was killed off - Jack Higgins really needs to take an axe to some other characters if he wants to keep the Dillon saga going, because as it stands now this series is completely out of steam and devoid of interest. That said, I'm sure I'll read the next one...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wolf at the Door, 6 Jan 2010
By 
P. Weitzman (St Albans, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) (Hardcover)
I found this book to be very disappointing and a most unsatisfactory read. In the first place it is described as the latest Sean Dillon thriller. Dillon only appears in the first chapter and then briefly at the end and plays no significant roll in the story. Early on in the book we learn the so called outcome and the rest of the book is taken up with who and how it came about. Everything was too easy to see and I now feel that Jack Higgens is working to a simple repeat formula and I can only hope that in future he will take greater care in producing his stories and thus get back to his original excellent form.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Audio The Wolf at the Door, 9 Mar 2010
By 
R. Shaw "Audio Books" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This particular recording was of a very poor standard for such a well known publishing organisation.

Either the production team did not get it right or the narrator Jonathan Oliver was having problems. Long pauses between sentence's and split words (broken words), which spoilt the enjoyment of listening
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars SAD TO SAY, 8 Sep 2010
I know Jack Higgins has not been well so maybe it's time for him to retire from writing. This is just about the worst book I have ever read and I gave up half way through. The spoken word makes you cringe and we have the same old, same old characters who could simply transfer from the last book to this with a different plot. Mr Higgins churns out almost as many books as James Patterson and they are almost as bad. This is not very good and fans of Jack Higgins are being ripped off with this drivel. Time to hang up your hat Jack me thinks.
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2.0 out of 5 stars I'm Rooting for the Pigs, 25 Sep 2014
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It comes to something that I have now started to dread these words in front of a Jack Higgins novel; Dillon is back. Through the 60s, 70s and 80s Higgins created countless fun thrillers that had a multitude of characters, but since the early 90s it has felt almost like all his books are about Sean Dillon and his crew. This is not a good thing as they all mould into one book and by now have far too many characters. 2009’s ‘The Wolf at the Door’ is a great example. Here Dillon and nearly every single one of his allies is almost killed on one night in a series of separate incidents, but by this point do we still care?

To be fair, Higgins does tackle the narrative in a slightly interesting way. The story opens with the attempted assassinations, then retreats to explore various avenues leading to the events. In the hands of a talented writer, or even Higgins in his pomp, this would prove a delicate and interesting way to reveal the thrills. However, this is the modern Higgins and it appears he has almost entirely lost the ability to structure an exciting story. Instead, you get people in rooms talking about events that have happened in previous novels. If I wanted to read about a previous novel, I would read that book.

There is an extremely old fashioned feel to ‘Wolf’ that is no longer appealing. Men with surnames hitting each other was fun in 1974, but by 2014 it is more old hat than a prawn cocktail served in a plastic pineapple. Higgins is almost ham-fisted in his writing, characters are too black and white, as well as being too numerous. His later novels have been like a sausage making exercise of the same thing over and over again. These are not the quality sausages either, but those made out of sawdust and old knees.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Bullet for Dillon please!, 5 Mar 2010
This review is from: The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) (Hardcover)
I used to love Jack Higgins thrillers. 'Solo', 'Confessional','Storm Warning', 'The Savage Day'. I was younger then and so was Jack.
Sadly his novels have not improved for many years and he has been peddling out the same tosh with the same awful dialogue, the same cardboard cut out characters, the same locations, for the last 17 years.
The Dillon series is trite, fantastical and bears no relation to reality whatsover. But I'm sure Jack knows this himself. One female character is described as having 'something of Jane Austen about her'. So now we have to read Austen to get an idea of what she looks like! Another character says'this is the real world we are talking about'. But there is nothing real here. Higgins writes fiction after all! The plot appears as though he wrote it all and then tossed all the pages up in the air and gathered them together any which way, as the story begins near the end!
His publishers obviously let Jack just do his thing and at 80 years of age and with nearly as many novels published as Agatha Christie he has a formula that although lazy and turgid, still sells.
I gave 'Night of the Fox'5 stars and there are many other Higgins novels that deserve all 5. This wasn't one of them.
A final Dillon novel in which all the regular characters are killed off will get 5 from me!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Utter rubbish, 20 Dec 2010
What a load of drivel. I've never read a Higgins novel before and I certainly won't be in the future. I gave up half way through. The characters were awful, no depth, no realism. The plot was.... well, there wasn't one really. People have already mentioned the dreadful dialogue. They weren't lying. The writing style was shocking, truly awful in every respect. I can't believe people rate this guy. What are they smoking?????? Possibly the worst book I have ever read. Yes, it was that bad.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jack Higgins, 20 Nov 2010
By 
S B DEMPSTER (Inverness, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Jack Higgins is one of my husband's favourite authors. Makes excellent reading... must do if he reads a book while having a bath. Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Wolf at the door, 10 Oct 2010
This review is from: The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) (Hardcover)
Very disappointed in what was a poorly written, rambling story. Billed as a Sean Dillon thriller, yet he hardly appears in the book at all. Have always enjoyed Higgins's books and found them hard to put down. After this offering I may never pick up another! He's lost the plot.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disapointing, 22 May 2010
By 
R. Mc Crudden - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) (Hardcover)
Feels as if Jack was writeing for the sake of it, hardly a Sean Dillon novel, iv spent longer stading at trafic lights than Sean spends in this novel, i felt the last Dillon book sag but this one fails dismaly, its the first time iv ever found it easy to set a Higgins book down. So Jack, either pick up the pace or finish Dillon off.
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The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17)
The Wolf at the Door (Sean Dillon Series, Book 17) by Jack Higgins (Hardcover - 3 Sep 2009)
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