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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solving humankinds problem - the Martian way!
Mars is now a green and fertile world thanks to the terraforming-efforts made in the previous two books of the trilogy. The conflict between the pro-terraforming "greens" and the militant "Reds", wanting to preserve Mars, first described in "Red Mars", and the struggle between the Earth-based super-corporations started in "Green Mars" is still omnipresent as the...
Published on 27 Oct 2001 by Lasse F

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well researched, largely without direction, not much action
Writing the trilogy must have required huge amounts of research. I applaud KSR for his efforts. However, I cannot applaud him for the significant lack of plot in this book. This book spends a large part of its 700+ pages describing landscapes and the way of life of a number of individual characters.
Most of the more interesting events are related in an almost...
Published on 21 Mar 2000 by S. Wheeler


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solving humankinds problem - the Martian way!, 27 Oct 2001
Mars is now a green and fertile world thanks to the terraforming-efforts made in the previous two books of the trilogy. The conflict between the pro-terraforming "greens" and the militant "Reds", wanting to preserve Mars, first described in "Red Mars", and the struggle between the Earth-based super-corporations started in "Green Mars" is still omnipresent as the story enters its third century with "Blue Mars". But as the planet strives for independence a third facet comes into focus - should the colony confront the future alone, with minimum contact with Earth, or should the planetary congress seek to aid their former adversary in its battle for survival against a disastrous flood, threatening to collapse the entire planet and possibly dragging Mars down in the fall.
What distinguishes Kim Stanley Robinson's work is his great focus on the socio-economic issues of the future: The power of Mega-corporations vs. civil rights and democracy, healthy environmental concern vs. radical militant "ecoterrorism", longevity-treatments vs. natural lifespans and so on. In Blue Mars these conflicts are in particularly seen in the context of how they're solved in both the Martian and the Terrestrial societies.
Personally I'm very fond of Kim Stanley Robinson's thought provoking style and I often find myself spending loads of time rethinking the "what-ifs" the book deal with. Blue Mars is my favourite in the trilogy - mostly because it has the longest horizons and deals with the entire humanity and so it feels more like a future vision that affects me - but you should give the entire trilogy a chance - It raises such an amazing array of questions that you just can't help thinking of a lot of issues in the context of the book. As it says on the cover of the book "it should be mandatory reading for the Martian settlers of the next century", but nevertheless everyone planning to stay down here ought to examine it as well.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful conclusion to an epic trilogy, 4 Oct 2005
By 
L. Davidson (Belfast, N.Ireland) - See all my reviews
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"Blue Mars" continues direstly from where "Green Mars" left off. The Martians have gained their independence from Earth and now set about establishing new forms of government and developing their own way of life, rather than have it decided for them by the Terran meta-nationals. The book focuses heavily on the actions of the remnants of the First Hundred, such as Sax,Ann,Maya and Nadia plus new characters like Zo and Nirgal.
"Blue Mars" as the title suggests is set on a fully terraformed Mars. The atmosphere has thickened and heated up and the ice seas have melted and created a hydrosphere similar to Earth. The masks and walkers have now been disposed of. The scientific substance of the book now concentrates on developing the longevity treatment, ecopoesis and the psychological difficulties of coping with living for 200 years plus.
I didn't find "Blue Mars" to be as fascinating and exciting as the first two books of the trilogy and was a bit overlong. Perhaps that was due to over familiarity with the setting and characters and it was only when Nirgal and Zo featured heavily that "Blue Mars" had a character of its own and came to life , but unfortunately most of the book concentrated on the First Hundred whose lifes work was more or less complete by the end of "Green Mars". I would have liked to have read more about "The Accelerando" instead. I also didn't like the prolonged ending to "Blue Mars"; I thought it was lacking in impact somewhat and didn't bring the Trilogy to the spectacular end it deserved.
However "Blue Mars" is still a wonderful book, full of impressive and credible scientific detail, and if Mars is to be colonised then this trilogy is a perfect guidebook for its terraformation. However the timeframe for the colonisation set out by Robinson is slightly over-optimistic I think ; maybe by a hundred years or so. I cant see antelope roaming the forests of Mars until the 23rd Century at least ! Although technology is advancing all the time.
As I read through the Mars Trilogy, I couldnt help but think that science, in its entirety, the geology,biology,physics,chemistry and all its subdivisions , is nothing more than Man progressively trying to get into the mind of God, to be God. They are a very humanist and rationalist series of novels, however they promote a form of intellectual elitism. Science is worshipped,science can provide the answers to everything and highly intelligent elitists know best. There is no room for religion or the supernatural in this vision.
"Blue Mars" is a must read for those who have read the first two books, it would be incomprehensible if you haven't. It is a fitting conclusion to a remarkable series of novels. It is also easy to read ; I raced through its 800 pages in 9 days, so theres no excuse for not reading the whole series now !
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant ending to a great trilogy, 3 Nov 2000
By A Customer
First thing that I need to make clear is that all three books in this trilogy were extremely boring at parts! I especially found Green Mars to be the worst. I thought the 700 odd pages were a waste and the book could have been much better if it were 300... In contrast, Blue Mars is much better.
Once you read Blue Mars, and complete the trilogy, you'll find how brilliant Kim Stanley Robinson is. OK, maybe he does carry on a bit unnecessarily about some parts, but once it's all done, I am really glad I read this trilogy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vast, Slow, Bold and Beautiful, 17 Jun 2005
By 
M. Bright (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
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On the US mirror site, the usual tedious carping from groupthinking right-wingers that accompanied 'RED' and 'GREEN' has been accompanied by a significant strand of criticism for the slow pace and meandering structure of the final volume of KSRs astonishing 'Mars' trilogy.
Granted, slowing down an already fairly ponderous narrative to a contemplative near-halt is a counterintuitive move, but consider the following:
1) Anyone not ready for a big, slow, character driven journey where literary style is as important as driving plot should have given up halfway through 'RED'. Why continue catering for them?
2) How much more disappointing would it have been if, having shown us the struggle to build a living world, the author fails to describe how people actually live in it?
I think this is what the final trilogy does - which is why the actual plot points sometimes feel a little forced - certainly the mild political wrangling that goes on doesn't deserve the same sort of treatment as the revolutionary fervour of the first two books. Presumably there was more than a little editorial pressure to add at least a little bit of direction - personally I could have done without it, and would have been just as happy with a series of incidents - vignettes showing the fascinating characters in the series enjoying (or otherwise) the fruits of their sacrifices while a new generation expands upon their work.
As to the sudden expansion of human colonisation - the 'Accelerando' - well, Stan's been so good about keeping everything within our own scientific horizons. Why not allow him a few flights of fancy? Remember, also, that this is two hundred years into our future - think back to the early 1800s. In any case, it allows him to have a happy ending on the cosmic as well as the personal scale. While the most tragic character - Ann, who saw so much of what she loved destroyed - finally achieves a rapprochement with the new Mars, we watch humanity overcoming its limitations, learning to grow without destroying everything around it and finding a thousand ways to live and work together. At its best, Science Fiction can express a profound, humanist vision that counteracts the pettiness of everyday life in a truly mind-expanding way - and this trilogy is Science Fiction at its very, very best.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Find out how it all ends!, 12 May 2010
By 
Ariadne Tampion (Leicestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Blue Mars (Paperback)
This is the third volume of a hefty trilogy, and worth reading, not least for the sense of achievement, if you have ploughed through the first two!

The story now extends from Mars to encompass the whole Solar System, although it is still Martian centric. I really could not make up my mind whether it is intended to be a utopian fantasy or a dire warning, or indeed, whether it is meant to be deliberately ambiguous. With a longevity treatment and associated sterility treatment widespread, one child per woman is the norm. In place of traditional families, people live and work communally in co-ops. Sex detached from pair-bonding and reproduction becomes entertainment. A graphic description of an orgy in a bath house left me feeling that this was something I personally would definitely not want to be involved with!

It is the slowest moving of all the books, with long descriptions of science and landscapes. Only an author of Robinson's standing would be allowed by his publisher to include so much padding. There are so many loose ends to be tied up, but, at such a slow pace, you have to become resigned to the fact that not all of them will be. As it crawls to its conclusion, I strongly recommend having a full box of tissues to hand in preparation for a highly emotional journey.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Realistic SciFi and human condition analysis: excellent !, 7 Jun 2000
By A Customer
This book like the other two is one of the best realistic science fiction currenly available. I don't know if every cited scientific data is correct, but it seems that the author has been trying to make it as close as possible. It's far from the usual lousy Start Trek where every law of physics are violated. The book may seem long, but in the author tries his best to make us feel the different caracters lives, and this is very good too. I definitely recommend it after reading the first two of the trilogy: Red Mars, and Green Mars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 9 Jun 1999
By A Customer
The Mars trilogy has rightly taken is place in the great Science Fiction stories of the decade, and the third novel is a worthy conclusion. Although with not as much action as the first two, it concentrates much more on the political aspects of the martians, and the internal squabbles which could very well be the death of any Martian colony. The characters develop very well again, and also present is the hard science underlying everything. As in the previous two, it is mainly these two things that conspire to make Blue Mars a brilliant novel, and the conclusion to a fantastic trilogy.
Excellent.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant epic trilogy, 14 July 2002
I'm astounded that some people who read KSR's Mars Trilogy criticise him for either being too wordy or not focused enough on creating complex characterisation. It is certainly true that the three books are a big committment at over 2000 words, but it is also true that KSR uses that volume of writing to build up an utterly convincing and complex alternate world. The pages he dedicates to description of landscape and place are among the best I have ever read (in any genre) and his grasp of characterisation is not far behind. What people don't seem to be able to grasp is that this is NOT just a enjoyable and simplistic sci-fi romp...there are plenty of those around if you want that...don't read this trilogy if you do. However, if you want quite possibly the most absorbing epic since Anna Karena (and I'm not being hyperbolic), plunge into the trilogy...it will repay you in spades.
Matt
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well researched, largely without direction, not much action, 21 Mar 2000
By 
S. Wheeler - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Writing the trilogy must have required huge amounts of research. I applaud KSR for his efforts. However, I cannot applaud him for the significant lack of plot in this book. This book spends a large part of its 700+ pages describing landscapes and the way of life of a number of individual characters.
Most of the more interesting events are related in an almost second-hand fashion and largely glossed over as his characters amble through their lives. You start to wonder why these characters are in the book other than to give you a feeling of being there.
KSR had the opportunity to write a tight, gripping plot about the social, economic, environmental and political issues facing those on Mars. Instead he wrote about the neuroses of his characters as they grow old gazing at numerous multi-coloured sunsets. On the whole this book is aimless, overly long and without any significant direction.
As a bedtime read I could only ever manage a couple of pages before nodding off.
I cannot recommend this book if you are looking for a gripping page-turner. If you want a sedate tour of Martian landscapes and sunsets with no real action then this book is for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars start with red mars, 11 Mar 2014
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Simply stunning trilogy... Genuinely a MUST read for sci fi aficionados. Can not recommend it more. Science, humanity, poetry... Sublime
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Blue Mars
Blue Mars by Kim Stanley Robinson (Paperback - 6 Aug 2009)
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