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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ON THE EDGE OF DARKNESS...WHERE PAST AND PRESENT COLLIDE...
This is a well written, compelling story of a love that intersects the past, as well as the present. An excellent piece of paranormal fiction, it keeps the reader riveted to the pages.
The story begins in the nineteen thirties, when a fourteen year old boy named Adam, while traipsing in the isolated crags of the Scottish highlands near an ancient Celtic stone, meets...
Published on 1 Dec 2002 by Lawyeraau

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Paranormal Thriller
This is a paranormal tale similar to some of Phil Rickman's stand alones. I was reluctant to buy it at first because the main plot relies heavily on time travel but the Scottish setting and druidic tradition lured me into buying it; if you expect this to be similar to Diana Gabaldan's sagas then you will be disappointed there is very little depth to the Pictish interludes...
Published on 29 July 2006 by Scriber_scouse


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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ON THE EDGE OF DARKNESS...WHERE PAST AND PRESENT COLLIDE..., 1 Dec 2002
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a well written, compelling story of a love that intersects the past, as well as the present. An excellent piece of paranormal fiction, it keeps the reader riveted to the pages.
The story begins in the nineteen thirties, when a fourteen year old boy named Adam, while traipsing in the isolated crags of the Scottish highlands near an ancient Celtic stone, meets Brid, a girl whom he mistakes for a gypsy, due to her wild, long hair, and her exotic style of dress. Unbeknownst to him, a portal in time has opened, allowing Adam and Brid, who is actually a Druid from the sixth century, to cross back and forth in time. Adam, however, does not realize that he is actually travelling back and forth in time, while Brid is not only fully aware of what is happening, but is doing so in contravention of what her uncle, a high priest to the Druids, and her training have taught her.
Over time, she becomes obsessive about Adam, who is her first love, while Adam, as he grows up, moves on with his life. In leaving the heartsick Brid behind and consigning her to his memories, he takes his life in a seemingly new direction.
Brid, on the other hand, forsaking the teachings of her people and incurring the wrath of her powerful uncle and a sure sentence of death, is dead serious about Adam, and she goes through the time portal in search of him. Adam, who has by now left home to go to medical school, is unaware of her obsession and of the lifelong quest now set in motion.
Over the years, Adam makes new friends, becomes a doctor, gets married, and has a family, but Brid, trapped in the wrong time, begins to haunt them all, as she searches for Adam. Her obsession with him finally turns deadly, and the body count begins to mount, as she seeks to tear him asunder from all whom he holds dear.
It is only fifty years into the nightmare that this obsessive love is finally put to rest. How this happens, and at what cost, will keep the reader turning the pages of this well written and imaginative novel.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Paranormal Thriller, 29 July 2006
This is a paranormal tale similar to some of Phil Rickman's stand alones. I was reluctant to buy it at first because the main plot relies heavily on time travel but the Scottish setting and druidic tradition lured me into buying it; if you expect this to be similar to Diana Gabaldan's sagas then you will be disappointed there is very little depth to the Pictish interludes of the novel, suprising as the author is a historian.

Adam Craig is a young Scottish boy growing up in the Highlands, the son of a severe Prebyterian minister in the twenties. Adam's life is shattered when his mother leaves his austere father; Adam begins to wander the hills to escape his misery and becomes fascinated by an ancient pictish cross. When he meets wild and beautiful Brid (pronounced Breed) he spends as much time with her as possible passing off her strange language, superstition and feudal way of life as her being the child of tinkers.

Brid though is of another time, she is a priestess in training and when Adam eventually moves on with his life leaving her behind; a dark obsession is spawned that stretches through the centuries between them and casts a dark curse over 50 years of Adam's life.

What makes this shine as a novel is the wonderfully written characters; no-one in Adam's life is safe from Brid's obsessive possession and the tension of the novel works because you care about these people and worry for their safety. Where this novel falls down is that the airy-fairy mysticism never feels fully grounded and some of the explanations can be confusing. Once the novel progresses post war to Adam's life as a young doctor raising a family the sparkle of the novel seems to dim, as we enter into the sixties and beyond. In this mid-section it is very hard to retain sympathy for Adam, although he does redeem himself in the last third of the novel.

Points against this novel were that it did drag out too long and the multiple perspectives felt confusing and too obtuse at times, also I felt the ending was quite rushed after such a long build up. I thought Liza rather than Adam's granddaughter Beth should have been the one to save the day, making Beth such a vital part of the novel so late on made no sense. I give this three stars as a paranormal thriller but the twist ending and lack of closure into these characters' lives bumped a star from my initial assessment.

One for fans of early Rickman or those who longed for something darker in Diana Gabaldan's books.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!!, 13 July 2002
This was the first Erskine book that I read, and it is amazing. Ever since reading this novel I have bought all of Erskine's books.
'On The Edge Of Darkness' is a truly eye-opening book, which provides suspense, magic and mystery, as well as love. It sends the reader through a whole range of emotions, for the first time whilst reading a novel I was actually shocked when events happened as it was never what I was expecting.
A real thrill ride, definatly worth buying! :)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the time it takes to read!, 9 Jan 2007
By 
Eirey (Galway, Ireland) - See all my reviews
I was really disappointed with this book! The character development is quite good at times, so it gets you involved with them, but then something significant happens (normally a death) and the response of the characters is quite shallow and unrealistic. The middle of the book is hundreds of pages too long when the plot moves so very slowly. The ending just really really annoyed me, not only was it rushed after all the time taken to develop the characters and the get through the midle of the book, but it hardly even makes sense. And finally the very last few pages made me really wish I hadn't bothered at all. I normally really enjoy this author's books and have read about five previous to this, but don't know if I will read any more now.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another Wonderful Tale!, 23 Nov 2003
By 
sallie crain (St.Albans, Herts. United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Ms Erskine has done it yet again with this magical tale which spans the centuries, telling the tale of Adam and Brid. What made it extra special for me was that part of it is set in my home town. Ms Erskine has clearly done her research and even mentions the coffee shop that used to be in the High Street! That certainly brought back plenty of memories.
The tale is gripping and full of nail-biting suspense. If I didn't need my beauty sleep, I would have read the whole story through without stopping!
Ms Erskine has a wonderful talent for storytelling and I hope that she writes many, many more stories to keep her army of fans entertained.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Predictable and long winded, 18 Aug 1999
By A Customer
I had been looking forward to this book after reading the House of Echos, but was fairly disappointed with the result. It did start off well but became more and more tedious as the story progressed, because what little did happen was SO obvious and predictable. Even the ending was boring, although this may well have been because I just didn't care anymore.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ON THE EDGE OF DARKNESS...WHERE PAST AND PRESENT COLLIDE..., 30 Dec 2002
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is a well written, compelling story of a love that intersects the past, as well as the present. An excellent piece of paranormal fiction, it keeps the reader riveted to the pages.
The story begins in the nineteen thirties, when a fourteen year old boy named Adam, while traipsing in the isolated crags of the Scottish highlands near an ancient Celtic stone, meets a girl named Brid whom he mistakes for a gypsy, due to her wild, long hair, and her exotic style of dress. Unbeknownst to him, a portal in time has opened, allowing Adam and Brid, who is actually a Druid from the sixth century, to cross back and forth in time. Adam, however, does not realize that he is actually travelling back and forth in time, while Brid is not only fully aware of what is happening, but is doing so in contravention of what her uncle, a high priest to the Druids, and her training have taught her.
Over time, she becomes obsessive about Adam, who is her first love, while Adam, as he grows up, moves on with his life. In leaving the heartsick Brid behind and consigning her to his memories, he takes his life in a seemingly new direction.
Brid, on the other hand, forsaking the teachings of her people and incurring the wrath of her powerful uncle and a sure sentence of death, is dead serious about Adam, and she goes through the time portal in search of him. Adam, who has by now left home to go to medical school, is unaware of her obsession and of the lifelong quest now set in motion.
Over the years, Adam makes new friends, becomes a doctor, gets married, and has a family, but Brid, trapped in the wrong time, begins to haunt them all, as she searches for Adam. Her obsession with him finally turns deadly, and the body count begins, as she seeks to tear him asunder from all whom he holds dear.
It is only fifty years into the nightmare that this obsessive love is finally put to rest. How this happens, and at what cost, will keep the reader turning the pages of this well written and imaginative novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A disappointing read, boring and trite., 24 Aug 1999
By A Customer
An avid fan of 'Lady of Hay' and 'Child of the Phoenix', I was greatly disappointed with this latest offering. The story began well enough - an unusual plot line and a promising list of characters, but soon descended into a trite and boring account of Adam's life and various loves. The ambiguous ending was irritating rather than interesting or challenging. A shameful waste of an ingineous plot premise and an interesting set of characters.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars On the Edge of Darkness, 12 July 2003
By A Customer
This was a totally new author for me, and I was very dubious whether I would enjoy the contents.
The story line is very strong without too many characters being introduced too quickly. The mystery and intrigue had me spellbound and unable to put the book down.
At the back of the fiction was the knowledge that the author is an acknowledged historian.
Although gripping I found it was absolutely fine for bedtime reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dreadful, 7 Jun 2012
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Have to admit that this book put me off Barbara Erskine for ages. It was repetitive to the point where I just wanted to rip my eyes out. In the end I only finished the book to satisfy myself that I wasn't missing anything. Brid is one annoying psycho and Adam is just a wet blanket who I just didn't give two hoots about in the end. Read this book a while ago but it has stuck in the memory as being one of the worst yet. My advice is: don't waste your money. Erskine has written far better, as in fact have many other authors in this genre.
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On the Edge of Darkness
On the Edge of Darkness by Barbara Erskine (Paperback - 19 Feb 2009)
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