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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Voyaging
The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.

After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay...
Published on 22 July 2005 by E. A Solinas

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Lewis's most interesting Pevensies return to Narnia for a third adventure
A book I returned to after nearly 20 years. I didn't have many lasting memories of this one - I think I only remembered the picture pulling the children in at the beginning.

Lewis brings back the two most interesting of his four Pevensies, Edmund and Lucy, for another cacking instalment in the Narnia series, this time a seafaring adventure into unknown lands -...
Published on 27 May 2009 by Greshon


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Voyaging, 22 July 2005
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The second volume of the Narnia Chronicles closed with the possibility of Lucy and Edmund -- though not their older siblings -- returning to Narnia. "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" makes good on that story, with the intrepid pair (plus a whiny cousin) returning on a strange sea voyage.

After the events of "Prince Caspian," Lucy and Edmund are sent off to stay with their obnoxious cousin Eustace. But when they admire a picture of a strange ship, suddenly all three kids are sucked in -- and land in a Narnian sea. On board the ship is King Caspian, now fully grown, who is determined to find a bunch of knights exiled by his murderous uncle, even if he has to go to the edge of the world (literally).

Lucy and Edmund are thrilled to be back in Narnia again, but Eustance proceeds to make trouble any way he can, complaining and causing trouble among the crew. But there are problems more horrifying than any of them can guess, from dragons to sinister "gold water" to a region filled with their worst nightmares.

"The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is one of Lewis's most original and tightly-written Narnian adventures. It's also a bit of a break from form. After two books of battles against evil tyrants, "Voyage" simply goes where no man/woman/mouse has gone before, and gives us a view of the Narnian world as more than one isolated little region.

And in some ways, it's also the darkest Chronicle. Lewis explores the theme of greed here -- greed for power, beauty, money and magic -- and has some scenes both chilling and majestic. But his archly humorous style peeks through in several places, whether it's pompous mouse Reepicheep or tea with a reclusive old wizard.

Edmund and Lucy are their usual plucky selves, albeit a bit more mature than before. But "Voyage" also introduces one of Lewis' most interesting characters in Eustace Clarence Scrubb. Like Edmund, Eustace is initially a peevish, lying boy who generally makes trouble, but slowly learns his errors. But unlike Edmund, Eustace doesn't have to ally himself to the baddie to learn that.

"Voyage of the Dawn Treader" was a turning point for the Narnia Chronicles, as well as the one that began venturing into darker territory. Engaging and tightly written.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good read., 29 Oct 2000
By A Customer
To fully understand this book you need to have read Prince Caspian, & the lion the witch & the wardrobe. It is my favourite book of the Narnia chronicles, as there are some hilarious moments, the mice are very funny!! It is set about 30 - 40 years ago, & you can tell that straight away!! The book has been written carefully, using good decripitions. It is very drawing & it is hard to put down. A really good Book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a magical voyage to the ends of the Narnian world, 12 Jan 2003
By 
A. Craig "Amanda Craig" (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
I particularly love this book (and The Silver Chair)out of all the Narnia Chronicles because I went to a progressive school just like that of Eustace Scrubb. Eustace is the horrid cousin of two of the original four who found their way into Narnia in The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe, and in this sequel to Prince Caspian all three are sucked into a picture in the spare room wall to join Caspian in his quest. He is searching for the seven seafaring Lords who left his wicked Uncle Miraz to search for the end of the world.
There are many marvellous adventures, including a fight with a sea-serpent and an island-pool that turns everything to gold, but the best chapters concern the reform of Eustace after greed turns him into a dragon.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FANTASTIC FUN, 17 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Sea-faring action and adventure with Edmund, Lucy, their rather annoying cousin Eustace and Prince Caspian.
The picture in the room of their Aunt and Uncle's home draws Lucy and Edmund back to Narnia. Caspian has called them and Narnia needs their help. However, pompous cousin Eustace has also been sucked into the picture and he's in for the adventure of a lifetime and some important lessons to learn!
The voyage on the Prince's Dawn Treader takes the adventurers all the way to the end of the world - to Aslan's own land and brings them into contact with many strange people and places along the way.
Beautiful spiritual exploration or just plain fantastic, imaginative fun!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Quest to the Edge of the World, 7 Jun 2003
By 
Mark Baker (Santa Clarita, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
When Caspian became king, he made a pledge to track down the seven friends of his father that had been sent to explore the unknown waters beyond the Lone Islands. After establishing peace, he sets off and is aided in his quest by Edmund, Lucy, and their cousin Eustace, who arrive from England via a magic picture. Bravely sailing into the unknown (occasionally prodded by the mouse Reepicheep), they encounter dragons, sea creatures, magic, and lots of danger. Will they be able to find the seven Lords?
I love this book in the series, probably partially because it is set at sea. The story is episodic in nature, but the quest and information found along the way keep things moving forward. And there is plenty of action and adventure to keep anyone entertained. Lewis really used his imagination to create some of the locals where the boat stops, and it's fun seeing what he came up with. I especially love the Dufflepuds, although I'm glad I never have had a conversation with them.
As with any series, there are little things you'll pick up on if you read them in order. However, it's not strictly necessarily. Anyone looking for a fantasy adventure will love this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece, 10 Oct 2005
By 
Tony Jones "Tony" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Whilst not as mythic as either Lion, Witch and Wardrobe or Magician's Nephew, this is the story I return to over the (many too many) years since i first read the books.
It shows that the format of the story evolves with fewer of the original four children entering Narnia along with their sceptical cousin, who undergoes real growth during the story, as do the other children.
Clearly a Narnia take on Homer's Odyssey, this is none the less an excellent read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Why Should We Not Come to the Very Eastern Edge of the World?", 12 Jan 2007
By 
R. M. Fisher "Ravenya" (New Zealand = Middle Earth!) - See all my reviews
The third book in the Chronicles of Narnia (or the fifth if you're reading them in chronological order), is a rather unusual book within the context of the series, considering the good-against-evil theme that permeates the other six books in the series is largely absent here. Of course there are dangers and trials, as well as personal conflict that need to be resolved, but because there is no central villain nor any fundamental evil that needs to be defeated, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is more thoughtful, more carefully paced, more obviously spiritual and more episodic than any of the other books.

Likewise is the role that the children from our world play within the story. Sadly, Peter and Susan are too old to return to Narnia, and so the adventure belongs to Edmund and Lucy, as well as their horrible cousin Eustace Scrubb who are sucked through a painting in a spare bedroom into Narnia. However, unlike in "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and "Prince Caspian", in which they had clear and important roles to play in the unfolding of Narnia's well-being, they are pulled aboard the ship the Dawn Treader in order to...well, just tag along really. Indeed, the children do not even set foot in Narnia throughout the course of the story - but crucially important words are spoken by Aslan at the conclusion of the tale that sheds a whole new light on the meaning behind the children's presence in Narnia: "In your world I have another name. This was the very reason you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little while, you may know me better there."

But I'm getting ahead of myself. After Lucy, Edmund and the odious Eustace are aboard the Dawn Treader they discover that their rescuer is Caspian, the boy crowned King at the conclusion of "Prince Caspian". But because of the time difference that exists between Narnia our own world, several years have passed in which Caspian has grown into a young man, whereas Edmund and Lucy remain children. Caspian is on a sea voyage to discover the fates of seven lords who were banished by his evil uncle Miraz; and map the uncharted seas of the East. Also on board is the talking mouse Reepicheep (also introduced in "Prince Caspian") who is on a quest of his own: to find Aslan's Country, said to exist at the eastern end of the world's oceans.

Edmund and Lucy (who are still considered monarchs in Narnia) quickly settle in to the routine of the ship, which is more than can be said for Eustace who seems only capable of making a nuisance of himself in his desire to return to more civilised lands. As the ship sets off into ever more dangerous waters and stopping at islands that become steadily stranger, Eustace eventually must come to find redemption in the discovery of the leonine Aslan - but I won't give away the details of his spiritual transformation, you'll have to read and find out for yourself! It is perhaps Eustace's development that makes up the main plot-thread of the book considering the book opens and closes on his character, though it is certainly not centred around him - Caspian, Edmund, Reepicheep and Lucy all get their chance to shine.

Furthermore, Lewis treats us an imaginative scope of adventure and mystery that is perhaps not matched by any other book in the series in regard to its variety and quantity. Since the fun of reading a book like this is in the discovery of each new marvel presented, it would be wrong of me to list them all - but of course it will come as no surprise to readers that Aslan's presence heavily surrounds the ship and its purpose. Some of Lewis's most overtly Christian connotations are found within "The Voyage" - yet as always, they are not so obtrusive that they become preachy or alienate readers who are not particularly interested in the subtext. Toward the end of the novel in particular, the christological references of the story are beautifully incorporated into the narrative of the story...and again, I have to resist temptation to go into detail!

As always, Lewis fills his books with little touches of intrigue and enigma, for example: the bracelet of a missing lord, which now hangs on a stone outcropping till the world ends, the unspoken sin of a star that was banished to earth, and the friendship that is formed between Lucy and a mermaid in the moment that they both meet and part. Lewis was a master at making small, thought-provoking events that didn't mean much to the overall continuation of the plot, but existed simply for their own sake in enriching and enlivening the story.

For many, "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" is the best book in the series; not to mention their favourite. To be honest, I'm not sure where I stand on such a question, but I do know that it is an unusual (in a good way!) inclusion in the Chronicles, and in many ways a turning point for the series. This is the last book in which Pevensie children play a major part in the action; as Eustace takes over in the next book "The Silver Chair" as protagonist. As such, there is a bittersweet quality to it, which is well in keeping to the nature and purpose of Narnia itself.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.", 9 Jun 2006
By 
Michele L. Worley (Kingdom of the Mouse, United States) - See all my reviews
So begins this story, in which Edmund and Lucy - the two youngest of the Pevensies, the only two still young enough to be allowed to enter Narnia - have had the bad luck to be sent for the summer to stay with Eustace's parents, and put up with Eustace's teasing about their "imaginary" country. Eustace's position at the beginning of this book is something like Edmund's at the beginning of THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE - he's bad company and untrustworthy, though his specific flaws are different from Edmund's.

Naturally, he is the fly in the ointment when Edmund and Lucy are drawn back into the Narnian world - he comes along too. As he's been raised reading all the wrong books and has a sad lack of imagination, he makes quite a fool of himself at first. Fortunately for us, he doesn't take center stage much until he comes into his first great adventure about a third of the way through the book, which more than makes up for things. The book is otherwise largely told from Lucy's point of view.

From the Pevensies' point of view, it's been a year since they were last in Narnia - and in fact, even once they are in the Narnian world, they aren't in Narnia itself this time. Caspian (for whom three years have passed) is fulfilling an oath he took at his coronation to sail for a year and a day eastward to find and if need be rescue the seven lords who were disposed of by his usurping uncle Miraz years ago by being sent to explore the unknown eastern seas beyond the Lone Islands - a Narnian possession that we've previously heard of but never seen. When the Pevensies and Eustace join the ship, the Dawn Treader is nearing the Lone Islands, where the ship's company meets one of a series of adventures, this being their last landfall before striking out into uncharted seas eastward. And one of the ship's company - Reepicheep the Talking Mouse, most valiant of the knights of Narnia - has an even greater ambition than to rescue the seven lords; he hopes to find Aslan's own country, that mysterious place to the east from which Aslan has always come into Narnia.

THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER, in fact, is a long ocean voyage in a world where "here be dragons" on a map may not be an idle warning, and even the Pevensies encounter magics and strange truths about the Narnian world that they had never guessed at. As well as more mundane dangers - great storms, supplies running short between islands - the ship's company encounters many of the legendary dangers attributed to the unknown in our world in the days of chivalry, both in and on the sea itself and on the various islands they discover. Their dragon, when he comes along, turns out to be an unexpected kind of problem. In the tradition of one of Lewis' own favourite fantasy writers, George MacDonald, the dragon is Eustace himself, who finally stumbles into a bit of magic that transforms him into a shape that more accurately reflects the state of his heart than does his human shape, giving him the much-needed shock of his life. The problem, of course, is how to transform him - and how to bring him along with the ship if they can't. For me, "The Adventures of Eustace" are where the book moves into high gear.

This book is where I particularly notice the difference between Lewis' original UK editions of the series - which are now those in print in the US and used for the audio editions - and his later text, which was used for the US editions that I first read, for which Lewis rewrote (and improved) the ending of the episode of "The Dark Island". Apart from that detail, the unabridged recording by Derek Jacobi is very well done. Of the narrators of the three books in which Reepicheep appears, Jacobi is the best at interpreting his character, giving him a strong, high-pitched voice that doesn't in the least sound fragile. Jacobi can also give a good reading of Aslan's deep growl.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Never a dull moment, 3 Sep 2004
By 
Amanda Richards "Hotpurplekoolaid" (ECD, Guyana) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This is the fifth book chronologically, and the third published. After "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe", it's probably the next most enjoyable of the series.
Peter and Susan are now too old to enter Narnia, and this time it's Edmund and Lucy embarking on their last magical adventure. We rejoin them during their stay with their new age aunt and uncle, and obnoxious cousin Eustace. A painting of a Narnian ship literally draws all three children in to the next adventure, where we advance three Narnian years from book four, "Prince Caspian".
Caspian, the boy King, is on a quest to find out what really happened to the seven lords who had been sent away by his evil uncle Miraz. This is the story of that perilous journey to the unknown Eastern Seas, and according to legend, the country of Aslan himself.
Journeying into the unknown is always fraught with danger, but after many thrilling adventures and much adversity, they are successful in solving the puzzle of the seven lords, for better or for worse. Time and time again, they seek Aslan's help, and in his mysterious ways, he guides them through their darkest hours.
Packed with excitement, adventure, magic and enchantment, pirates, dragons, treasure and invisible people, there's never a dull moment aboard the Dawn Treader.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Voyage of the dawn treader, 15 April 2003
By 
This 'the voyage of the dawn treader' is the 5th book in the chronicles of Narnia, unlike the other books it is set mainly in the sea, and is full of exploration and adventure. In the previous book 'prince caspian' Peter and Susan are told that they will never again enter Narnia because they are too old. Their two younger siblings, Lucy and Edmund are at their cousin's house, Eustace Scrubb, a picture in his room transports the three onto the ship 'the dawn treader'
Once on board they find out it is the ship of the king Caspian who is an old freind of Edmund and Lucy, and that they are exploring the seas to find some of his fathers freinds who had strangely disapeared.
A classic Narnia character(Reepicheep the plucky mouse) is trying to fulfil his dream of going to the worlds end to the country of Aslan.
Eustace is moaning all time about this, that and the other but finaly gets his comeuppance. On their journey they encounter many beasts but will they live to tell the tale?
A sensational book that will leave you wanting more and more, for anyone from 9+. I liked the book because it was fast paced and something was always happening.
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