Customer Reviews


229 Reviews
5 star:
 (135)
4 star:
 (55)
3 star:
 (18)
2 star:
 (16)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book hits like a rogue wave
This is the best nautical non-fiction I have ever read. Mr. Junger develops a story far more frightening than any Koontz or King novel. I was out in a Coast Guard boat (UTB) off of Florida on Halloween day 1991 and conditions there, while far, far, far less extreme than up north, were awe-inspiring. Junger's description of storm formations, wave heights, and ship...
Published on 10 April 1998

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One sided view of the evacuation of the sailboat Satori
I am the son of Ray Leonard, the captain and owner of Satori. The Coast Guard "rescue" of the crew and captain of Satori, as described in part of this book, is based on one crew member's account and doesn't give an accurate impression. The captain never wanted a rescue attempt. He knew that the small, solid boat could withstand the conditions it was in. The...
Published on 22 July 1997


‹ Previous | 1 223 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book hits like a rogue wave, 10 April 1998
By A Customer
This is the best nautical non-fiction I have ever read. Mr. Junger develops a story far more frightening than any Koontz or King novel. I was out in a Coast Guard boat (UTB) off of Florida on Halloween day 1991 and conditions there, while far, far, far less extreme than up north, were awe-inspiring. Junger's description of storm formations, wave heights, and ship construction were first rate. He does a credible job of piecing together the last hours of the "Andrea Gail" and the terror the crew must have felt. And the chapters devoted to the U.S. Coast Guard and Air National Guard rescuers made me feel proud to have served. Lastly if people don't believe in at least the possibility of a 100 ft wave than they don't know the ocean. Anything is possible. Overall an outstanding book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Make sure you enjoy your next swordfish steak, 8 Aug 2000
By A Customer
I thoroughly reiterate what other reviewers have said, but the book doesn't get the full 5 from me. Both my girlfriend and I read this book, and I got more out of it than her, we think because men have more of a taste for the complex and intricate detail in the book about fishing and meteorology. It really is very dense in places, and you need a good deal of intellectual curiosity to get through some sections. The book is also a very difficult one to write, because noone really knows what happened to the Andrea Gail during her last hours. But given that, Junger does a superb detective job, and paints a imaginary portrait of truly unsettling realism and plausibility.
Finally, I was utterly blown away (sic) by some of the fishing stories included in the book - rarely in a piece of writing have I been brought closer to the concept of mortality than during the tale of a man in the 19th century who survived a shipwreck, to describe the sensation of drowning and losing consciousness. Junger perfectly intertwines this with a graphic description of the biological processes as we now understand them. This and many other parts of the book are brutal, harrowing, haunting and very memorable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One sided view of the evacuation of the sailboat Satori, 22 July 1997
By A Customer
I am the son of Ray Leonard, the captain and owner of Satori. The Coast Guard "rescue" of the crew and captain of Satori, as described in part of this book, is based on one crew member's account and doesn't give an accurate impression. The captain never wanted a rescue attempt. He knew that the small, solid boat could withstand the conditions it was in. The crew, in contrast, were very frightened and apparently issued the mayday call. When the Coast Guard came to the boat they ordered everyone off. Even after she was abandoned, Satori continued through the storm with no damage, eventually being recovered from a Maryland beach. Another sailboat, the Stafka I, also sailed safely through the same part of the storm. The author never contacted Ray Leonard, even though he devotes many pages to the "rescue" from Satori.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars After seeing the movie..., 11 July 2002
By 
Have to admit that I saw the movie first which encouraged me to buy the book, mainly to get more details and check that the movie wasn't just taking artistic license to extreme (as usual). The book was extremely well documented and written, certainly managed to put me off going to sea in storms. As a person who doesn't generally read a lot of non-fiction being able to read this while visualising the movie was great, made the whole experience much more enjoyable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Perfect Storm, 29 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is a decent enough read and I am a fan of this type of true story. However, having just read Jake Watson's book ' SAR ' , a true story of Royal Air Force helicopter search and rescue here in the UK, by comparison, The Perfect Storm is far to over-dramatised. I still enjoyed the book and wanted to get the literary version after watching the film. The book does go into much more detail than the film and much of the background information is fascinating. I particularly enjoyed the build up to the tragic event with regard to the degrading meterological stuation and the stability problems with the Andrea Gail. It is an epic story of bravery at sea, courage in the air and a great battle against the elements. Would I recommend this book? Yes, but if I could only afford one book, I'd buy SAR.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A shot of cold North Atlantic water down your spine!, 11 Jun 1997
By A Customer
Junger has woven a tightly crafted account of a 100-year storm at sea that even landlubbers can appreciate. For those who have been to sea, this is a story of nature's wrath that will scare you thoroughly, and make you realize how fortunate you have been to avoid the fate of the Andrea Gail, a 72-foot long-line sword fishing boat caught at the wrong place at the wrong time. The author carefully recounts the innocent decisions made by captain and crew over a period of weeks that led to their being trapped in a situation from which there was no escape. The chilling thing is that they probably knew they were dead days ahead of time, when they saw the weather faxes showing the storm barreling down on them. A boat 72 feet long doesn't stand a chance against 100 foot breaking waves, and with a top speed of 12 knots, there was no where for Andrea Gail to go in the time she had until the storm hit. If you have never been to sea, this book is as close as it gets. My only criticism is that the book could benefit from the inclusion of additional charts and diagrams showing the path of the storm center and direction and extent of the 100+ mph winds swirling into the center.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 20 Sep 1998
By A Customer
While somewhat interesting, I found the focus on the Andrea Gail unsatisfying since no one could say with certainty exactly what happened to the crew. I found the section on the parajumpers more interesting and, for me, it saved the book from being a complete waste of time. Still, I did throw it out when I finished with it...something I almost never do with a book.
For those interested in the sea and its many faces, I would recommend John McPhee's Looking for a Ship as a far superior book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This book is poorly written and unfocused., 6 Dec 1998
By A Customer
Unfortunately, the stories of the men lost at sea get lost in a quagmire of unrelated details, trivia, and imagined conversations. For the most part, the writing gets bogged down, and the point of the book is foggy. However, the descriptions of the survivors' experiences at sea are fascinating.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Flat and flawed, 23 April 1998
By A Customer
Flat characterizations, confusing transitions, and over dramatizing in some scenes -- are PJs really supermen? Is Ray Leonard really that dumb and selfish? Whatever happened to the Sartori did it eventually sink? Is the author claiming, and then justifying, the Coast Guard's turning off the Andrea Gale's EPIRB? This is a serious charge. Some of the history and technique of commercial fishing sounds accurate, as does the drowning description, but this is fiction so how much can any of the seemingly factual stuff be relied on? Mr. Junger should have signed on as a fishing boat crew member first then he might have been able to write about something he knows. Not worth the money.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It should have been a great book, 27 Jun 1998
By A Customer
What a great idea for a book. The weather - we all know about it, most talk about it at least once a day, if not more. What a chance to take this often poorly understood topic and transform it to something really exciting. Imagine, a very low pressure system, so low it raises the ocean beneath it next to a very high pressure system of very cold air in Canada. Now imagine the forces at work between them. I can see masses of cold and warm air feuding for supremacy. Alas, what I found in the book were pages and ponderous pages of boozing people in pubs. Then more plodding pages of what the storm could have been like. In summary, a great idea, that needed just a little more work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 223 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Man Against the Sea
The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Man Against the Sea by Sebastian Junger (Paperback - 2 May 2006)
6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews