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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This series gets better and better...
This was a highly enjoyable, and FAST read! An excellent page turner and plenty of fascinating real history woven into the story of Uhtred during the reign of King Alfred in late 9th Century Britain.

The story starts a few months after the end of "The Pale Horseman"(book 2), after the dust has settled from the battle of Ethandun. Although Uhtred was something...
Published on 28 May 2006 by Iceni Peasant

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great story but not the best performance
I've listened to all of Bernard Cornwell's Saxon series in audiobook format (and read them in hardcover, too) and this is an OK version of book 3. I'm not going to comment on the plot but rather about the reader. If you are going to listen to a book, the reader is as important as the content. The right reader can bring a good story to another level. Unfortunately, while...
Published on 17 Nov. 2008 by cwooden


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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This series gets better and better..., 28 May 2006
By 
Iceni Peasant (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
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This was a highly enjoyable, and FAST read! An excellent page turner and plenty of fascinating real history woven into the story of Uhtred during the reign of King Alfred in late 9th Century Britain.

The story starts a few months after the end of "The Pale Horseman"(book 2), after the dust has settled from the battle of Ethandun. Although Uhtred was something of a battle-winning hero at the end of the last book, he wasn't given much of a reward from Alfred, so again he finds himself wanting to desert the king and makes his way north again, with the hope of winning back his rightful family home of Bebbanburg.

Of course things are never that simple, and the author has created a wonderful series of plots, and sub-plots with the introduction of several new characters...including a slave that becomes a king and that man's sister Gisela, who seems deeply linked to Uhtred. Again Uhtred is forced to take actions that lead him away from his real goal. There are betrayals, skirmishes and surprises all the way through the book, with ultimately Uhtred's fate still bringing him back to Alfred!

Uhtred's main companion at the start of the book is the ex-nun Hild, and she has a remarkable story in the background of the book, and as a reader you have to smile at how it turns out. There are some excellent returns of characters, from Ragnar and Father Beocca, to Kjartan and his son Sven.

If you liked the first two books in this series, you'll love this third one. This series gets better and better, giving the reader a real sense of the atmosphere and culture of the 9th Century and the factions of Danes and Saxons, and pagan versus Christian. I truly believe this series is Bernard Cornwell's best work so far!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Star Rating, 3 Feb. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Lords of the North (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 3) (Paperback)
This is the third book in the series following The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman and the Vikings are slowly but surely leaving their mark on 9th century England. Uhtred the hero of the previous book has gained little ground in King Alfred's estimation and the feeling of not being wanted makes Uhtred homesick for the north and his friends in the Viking forces.

There are many plots and counter plots and it seems that the fates of Uhtred and Alfred inexplicably draw the two men back to one another. The sight and sounds of battle, poverty and suffering are all brought to life in the pages of the book.

The book is just as fast paced and readable as the previous two. In fact I thought that this one was the best of the three. Cornwell really is a master story teller. There is virtually no one to beat him at this type of book.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 2 July 2006
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is the third book in the series following The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman and the Vikings are slowly but surely leaving their mark on 9th century England. Uhtred the hero of the previous book has gained little ground in King Alfred's estimation and the feeling of not being wanted makes Uhtred homesick for the north and his friends in the Viking forces.

There are many plots and counter plots and it seems that the fates of Uhtred and Alfred inexplicably draw the two men back to one another. The sight and sounds of battle, poverty and suffering are all brought to life in the pages of the book.

The book is just as fast paced and readable as the previous two. In fact I thought that this one was the best of the three. Cornwell really is a master story teller. There is virtually no one to beat him at this type of book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Star Rating, 14 Mar. 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This is the third book in the series following The Last Kingdom and The Pale Horseman and the Vikings are slowly but surely leaving their mark on 9th century England. Uhtred the hero of the previous book has gained little ground in King Alfred's estimation and the feeling of not being wanted makes Uhtred homesick for the north and his friends in the Viking forces.

There are many plots and counter plots and it seems that the fates of Uhtred and Alfred inexplicably draw the two men back to one another. The sight and sounds of battle, poverty and suffering are all brought to life in the pages of the book.

The book is just as fast paced and readable as the previous two. In fact I thought that this one was the best of the three. Cornwell really is a master story teller. There is virtually no one to beat him at this type of book.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars lords of the north part 3 of this series, 24 May 2006
By 
Mr. T. Gibson "thomasg624" (york uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Mr. Cornwell has done it again with this third book in his alfred series. I couldn't put this down. These are the first of his books I have read and I find myself looking forward to each installment with anticipation. This book again weaves historical fact with fiction most effectively so much so that the edges between the two are blurred as one enters the world of Utred. The political intigue, as this central character is manipulated by those in power around him including a slave who becomes King because of Utreds actions creates a powerful picture of what life may have been like (more likely than not I would think)1000 years ago. treachery and betrayal play there part as utred begins to accept what fate has in store for him despite his better judgement. A nice touch is that these are supposedly the characters recolections but the skill of the story teller still leaves one wondering whether our hero will make it. Like a saga of the period the story twists and turns around daring do and the pits of dispair with skill. The violence is there however although graphic at times not unnecessarily so but of it's period and serves it's purpose in what is a war story. Although that is not all it is.

The story is faster moving than the pale horseman as utred travels north then abroad then to wessex to end up in the north again. Familiar characters reappear together with new ones as vengeance is sought.

All in all I am now left waiting in anticipation for the next instalment of this brilliant series set in one of my favourite periods of the history of britain. There is just enough fact to intrigue the historian in me with the fiction providing the meat on the historical bones.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Much better, 28 Mar. 2007
By 
This review is from: The Lords of the North (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 3) (Paperback)
The third book in this series is better than the second. For a start, the plot is much more involving, even if the ending is a little predictable. But the journey to the end is interesting. The book moves the focus of activity to Northumbria. As Bernard always is able to do, he creates an exciting and believable backdrop of ruthless political infighting in the old kingdom of Northumbria. Uthred finds himself as an advisor to the Northumbrian King, who is keen to emulate Alfred, asking of each difficult situation what Alfred would do. Uthred finds himself, for the first time time the series, praising Alfred's foresight and wisdom. He learns through others of Alfred's cunning political machinations, and acquires an increasing respect for him. Partly because of this, you even begin to warm to Uthred a little.

Alfred only appears once or twice in the book, and it is all the stronger for it. He is very much the unseen hand - people do his work be it consciously or unconsciously. You believe that he really is the king, which was a real stretch of the imagination in the first and second books. Somehow in this book Bernard makes Alfred more enigmatic, whereas in the previous two, he was just a fish out of water, and mostly helpless. In short, it's a marked improvement on the previous book.

Overall, I think this series is a moderate success, and is fairly similar in strengths and weaknesses to Bernard's two other series. In each series, the first novel is an absolute treat as you become absorbed into the exciting and believable world Bernard has created. The second and third books don't live up to the same standard. It might make it a little more interesting in future if Bernard came up with a character that had some weaknesses in future. Perhaps the biggest problem is that all the main characters in each of the series are warriors/soldiers, brave, fearless, indomitable - and it's never a matter of if they will succeed, but how. It pretty much eliminates any sense of suspense.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He's done it again and again and again.., 30 May 2006
By 
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Another superb historical journey into an era so little thought of and yet Barnard Cornwall shows such a great ability to blend research and reality with a great plot and superb turn of phrase. His characterisation is rich, description of both land, action and person strong and the plot always compelling.

Another recommendation for this, the third part of his Dane vs Saxon series. Please don't stop Bernard, this is a great addition to your portfolio and I long for the next installment (and many more to come).
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cracking Read, 17 Jun. 2007
By 
A. C. Cooper (Doncaster, S. Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Lords of the North (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 3) (Paperback)
What can I say? Excellent! I'm a big fan of Bernard Cornwell's work having read Sharpe for years. However in recent years the Sharpe series has become a bit weak with the addition of several pot boiling fillers. The new Saxon series has however taken up the torch with a vengeance. Having already read the first two books in the series last year I was eagerly awaiting this one and I wasn't disappointed.

The story follows Uhtred's journey into Northumbria, his troubled homeland, to confront his usurping uncle and his arch enemies Kjartan and Sven. The action and intrigue is intense and fast paced and Cornwell's historical detail is second to none. His characters are excellently rendered and very believable, he really is the master of the anti-hero (both Sharpe and Uhtred are testament to that). Cornwell does seem to have a serious problem with Christianity at times and it shows strongly in this book with more evil priests and monks than you can shake a battle axe at. I like the way Cornwell blurs the line between good and evil and neither favors at side himself or expects the reader to, not all the Danes are rampaging barbarians and not all the Saxons are honest defenders of the faith. Given the choice between the thunder God, feasting and pillaging and fasting, gruel and celibacy which would you choose?

All in all this is a cracking rip-roaring adventure that will leave your buckle thoroughly swashed. I can't wait for the fourth installment (due in September I think).
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great story but not the best performance, 17 Nov. 2008
By 
cwooden (Arlington, VA USA) - See all my reviews
I've listened to all of Bernard Cornwell's Saxon series in audiobook format (and read them in hardcover, too) and this is an OK version of book 3. I'm not going to comment on the plot but rather about the reader. If you are going to listen to a book, the reader is as important as the content. The right reader can bring a good story to another level. Unfortunately, while Jamie Glover is a good reader but this is not the best version available. Hold out for the one read by Richard Armitage. His reading is far superior to the other narrators (Tom Sellwood reads the unabridged version and Jamie Glover's version is abridged). It's a shame that Amazon doesn't sell Mr. Armitage's version but you can get it through audiobookcollection{.com}.
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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE LORDS OF THE NORTH Reign Supreme!, 2 Aug. 2006
By 
Kimberly Gelderman (Spring Lake, MI USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Yet again another page turner in this third of the series that started with THE LAST KINGDOM and follows with THE PALE HORSEMAN. The exciting and oftentimes dangerous adventures of Uhtred, the dispossessed son of a Northumbrian lord who finds his fate is not always of his own choosing.

Throughout the story he continues to try to avoid King Alfred of Wessex (also known as Alfred the Great) but finds himself once more doing his bidding. Uthred and Ragnar are once again reunited and join together in King Alfred's cause. He also becomes a slave for two years in the story and vows his revenge on those who betrayed him.

The story has many plots and subplots and for Uhtred, the Northumbrian raised as a Viking, as well as the reader of this tale, there is never a dull moment! Highly recommended! I eagerly anticipate the next installment in this series! Thank you for such a great series Mr. Cornwell!
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The Lords of the North (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 3)
The Lords of the North (The Warrior Chronicles, Book 3) by Bernard Cornwell (Paperback - 27 May 2010)
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