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33 Reviews
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book
Being the mother of a child with ASD I have read many books on the subject. This was a refreshing change to read something that was fictional but based on fact. The author knows her stuff and to have a book based on autism written as a story as opposed to long winded facts was a blessing and at times funny. Recommended, love this book, enough to write my first review!
Published on 13 July 2006 by Sarah

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More family melodrama for fans of Jodi Picout
Melanie is an American living in London with her English husband Stephen, and their two young children. Melanie feels as though her life is falling apart at the seams. She isn't eating properly, she can't face doing anything, or going out, her life revolves around looking after the children. She is seeing a therapist, but she already knows what the problem is: her...
Published 22 months ago by neverendings


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars spell binding, 14 Aug 2010
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
This book both educates and entatains the auther. i couldn't put it down, the 1st 2 chapers are slow but the story has a really good plot that makes you what to read on. i really enjoyed it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring, 19 Jan 2010
By 
FCM Daniels-Webb "francien21" (Narre Warren Victoria Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
I couldn't put it down, such an easy read. And it is just as I have
experienced with my grandsons, a whirlwind of specialists (and I agree, useless)
who charge the earth to parents who are searching for a glimpse, an utterance of
hope.
And lots of love and faith gets results. Passed it on.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Every Voice Counts, 25 April 2006
By 
BeatleBangs1964 (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking
Melanie Marsh, an American living in England copes with a husband who is growing ever more distant; a bright 4-year-old daughter, Emily and son Daniel, who is 3.

Daniel's autism is the sun which the story revolves; Daniel's delayed speech is the heart of the story. Emily copes well with her brother and attempts to play with him and talks to him. Daniel, who had developed normally until he was 19 months old, became nonverbal; walked on his toes; insisted on nursing until he was 3 and almost never slept through a night. Melanie is desperate to find interventive treatment for Daniel and spare him from attending a special school. Her husband Stephen, however bangs on the drum for such a school placement for their son.

Their marriage erodes; Emily is devastated at not having Stephen in their home. She is enrolled at a prestigious preschool at Stephen's insistence. I just loved it when Emily said her favorite part was coming home at the end of the day.

Autism is presented in a very realistic way. Daniel's placement on the spectrum is insidious and gradual. Readers share Melanie's sorrow and frustration in coping with Daniel's behavior and her soldierly efforts to encourage speech in her child.

Melanie is quite astute about autism; she suggests that perhaps many of the children in her area's autism program have allergies to milk and might do better on soy/rice milk or goat's milk. As is expected, she is dismissed and her suggestion is summarily rejected. In FIGHTING FOR TONY by Mary Callahan is about a young man whose autism was caused by an allergy to milk. Tony, born in 1978 has been free of autism for the majority of his life once milk was excluded from his diet and many more experts are now exploring the causal link of a lactose allergy in some autistics. However, not all people with autism have this allergy.

Daniel makes his round of specialists. The first speech therapist is an overbearing woman with a fourth child on the way who talks at Daniel and discounts everything Melanie tells her. Melanie's instincts and suggestions are dead on, but the "specialist" refuses to even ackowledge the validity of a mother's account. Some specialist! To add insult to injury, the woman tells Melanie not to seek the help of an Andy O'Connor. She warns Melanie that O'Connor is a maverick lacking proper credentials. How unethical and unprofessional to discuss another specialist in this fashion and to a client! Since she is such a bust, naturally Melanie seeks Andy O'Connor out and one cannot help loving this clever man whose natural instincts work wonders with Daniel.

O'Connor applies common sense along with the ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) approach; he confides that his oldest brother had Kanner's Autism and remained nonverbal his entire life. A funny, delighful character, Andy O'Connor brightens up the Marshs' lives. He helps Melanie toilet train Daniel and his work with the family brings them all strides forward.

Naturally, a romance develops which is not suprising. Melanie does end up with a partner, but not the one I hoped she'd pick. All in all, a good story about a child with autism from a mother's perspective.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 3 April 2006
By 
M. Ellingham "Mark Ellingham" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
This is such a great book. It's about autism and a desperate struggle to secure a future for a child. Yet it's funny, uplifting and utterly engaging. It is definitively not one of those roll-in-misery stories that surface in the non-fiction charts. It's a sparkling, fun novel, albeit one that will put a lump in your throat at times, and from a writer whose voice resonates with care and humanity and wilfully eccentric good sense. I read it at one sitting and can hardly imagine any reader doing otherwise.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buy two!!, 10 Mar 2006
By 
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
I bought a copy of this amazing book for a friend of mine with an autistic child and found I wan't able to let go of it. It's just stunning. So full of pain and hope and despair and optimism. By the time I got to the end it was stained with coffee and knawed on by my eighteen month old and I knew I wanted to read it again- so the book was mine and I bought another to give my friend (who said she laughed and cried her way through it). This is a book both to be kept and to be given away. So buy two!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Daniel isn't talking - great, 13 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
This book came in great condition and was just what I had wanted, really a fab read. Worth buying great
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best read for a long time, 3 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
I read a lot, but it has been some time since I had a book I didn't want to put down and that I hurried back to. At times, I had to keep on reminding myself that it was a novel - it was so convincing (no doubt partly because of the author's personal experience of the topic). I shall definitely be choosing another book by Marti Leimbach soon.
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5.0 out of 5 stars excellent service, 9 Mar 2009
By 
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
thsi book arrived as anticipated in good order, well packaged and in mint condition. have now read it and very much enjoyed the read. some very touching moments.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Every Voice Counts, 25 April 2006
By 
BeatleBangs1964 (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
Melanie Marsh, an American living in England copes with a husband who is growing ever more distant; a bright 4-year-old daughter, Emily and son Daniel, who is 3.

Daniel's autism is the sun which the story revolves; Daniel's delayed speech is the heart of the story. Emily copes well with her brother and attempts to play with him and talks to him. Daniel, who had developed normally until he was 19 months old, became nonverbal; walked on his toes; insisted on nursing until he was 3 and almost never slept through a night. Melanie is desperate to find interventive treatment for Daniel and spare him from attending a special school. Her husband Stephen, however bangs on the drum for such a school placement for their son.

Their marriage erodes; Emily is devastated at not having Stephen in their home. She is enrolled at a prestigious preschool at Stephen's insistence. I just loved it when Emily said her favorite part was coming home at the end of the day.

Autism is presented in a very realistic way. Daniel's placement on the spectrum is insidious and gradual. Readers share Melanie's sorrow and frustration in coping with Daniel's behavior and her soldierly efforts to encourage speech in her child.

Melanie is quite astute about autism; she suggests that perhaps many of the children in her area's autism program have allergies to milk and might do better on soy/rice milk or goat's milk. As is expected, she is dismissed and her suggestion is summarily rejected. In FIGHTING FOR TONY by Mary Callahan is about a young man whose autism was caused by an allergy to milk. Tony, born in 1978 has been free of autism for the majority of his life once milk was excluded from his diet and many more experts are now exploring the causal link of a lactose allergy in some autistics. However, not all people with autism have this allergy.

Daniel makes his round of specialists. The first speech therapist is an overbearing woman with a fourth child on the way who talks at Daniel and discounts everything Melanie tells her. Melanie's instincts and suggestions are dead on, but the "specialist" refuses to even ackowledge the validity of a mother's account. Some specialist! To add insult to injury, the woman tells Melanie not to seek the help of an Andy O'Connor. She warns Melanie that O'Connor is a maverick lacking proper credentials. How unethical and unprofessional to discuss another specialist in this fashion and to a client! Since she is such a bust, naturally Melanie seeks Andy O'Connor out and one cannot help loving this clever man whose natural instincts work wonders with Daniel.

O'Connor applies common sense along with the ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) approach; he confides that his oldest brother had Kanner's Autism and remained nonverbal his entire life. A funny, delighful character, Andy O'Connor brightens up the Marshs' lives. He helps Melanie toilet train Daniel and his work with the family brings them all strides forward.

Naturally, a romance develops which is not suprising. Melanie does end up with a partner, but not the one I hoped she'd pick. All in all, a good story about a child with autism from a mother's perspective.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read, 31 Oct 2007
By 
LA Nelson "LANI" (NI) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daniel Isn't Talking (Paperback)
I am not a great reader but this book got my attention and I could not put it down. Must be read
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Daniel Isn't Talking
Daniel Isn't Talking by Marti Leimbach (Paperback - 10 Jun 2011)
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