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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An entertaining and gripping read
I was given this by a friend who accidently purchased two copies with her Amazon 'one click'! I took it on holiday to Brasil with me (!) and loved it. I thought it was a well written book that presented some otherwise impossible to understand data in an entertaining and enjoyable way (if reading about how the end of the human race might look like can be called...
Published on 16 Dec 2009 by J. Nicholson

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A different approach with some merit.
The book attempts to show how different rises in temperature for the century will affect us.

It is readable and informative, and thought-provoking. It's flow, however, is interrupted by continual references to the same consequences which were mentioned in previous (degree) chapters, and give the impression that the references were inserted in a slightly tired...
Published on 10 Mar 2012 by Acts5v29


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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Required to Help Understand Climate Change, 10 Jun 2008
By 
Mr. J. F. Grant (Sheffield, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Here we are confused and scared about what is to happen next. Each side picks what they believe to be key evidence which points to what will happen in the future. But here's the rub we don't know! Historical evidence is useful showing us what could happen within the natural cycle. But are we within a natural cycle? Has the planet ever had a species which over hundreds of years has released stored carbon and methane (as well as other "thermally opaque" gases) into the atmosphere over such a relatively short time?

What do we do?

First, we need to know what could happen then allocate sufficient resources to make sure we are secure against the unacceptable. This book sets these possible levels of that "unacceptable" change.

It allows us to understand that doing nothing is actually an action; doing nothing means "Business as Usual" which means the continued emissions of Giga Tonnes of global warming gases into the atmosphere.

Anyone for Russian roulette?
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9 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good easy read and an eye opener, 24 Mar 2007
This review is from: Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet (Paperback)
I found this book an excellent read! having never readup on climate change and as layman I found it quite easy on the brain. Scientific concepts and research in a story like narrative. I have though one gripe - due to the nature of the subject the book is full of global geographcial placenames however there are no pages with a distant scent of a map in the book.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lynas paints a possible apocalyptic future for us all, 1 Oct 2008
By 
Daniel Storey "Book_Worm_Daniel" (Rochester, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Mark Lynas had spent months in libraries reading and taking notes about future global weather changes from scientific journals and from his studies he has put together this book.
The book explains to the reader what would happen to the planet if it were to get six degrees hotter over the next 100 years.
Each chapter explains what would happen to world as it got 1 degree hotter.
Chapter 1 explains what would happen if the planet got one degree hotter and chapter 6 finishes by explaining what would happen if the planet got six degrees hotter.
This book is not easy to digest as it paints a very apocalyptic future for us humans should climate change not be halted.
In the final chapter Mark explains how we can prevent this scenario ever happening.
A very different book from Al Gore's inconvient truth in a sense that this book looks at what could happen rather than what is happening now.
If the subject global warming interests you than this book is well worth a read and will give you a great insight in future life on earth if we fail to act now.
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18 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just another rant., 21 May 2008
Both sides of the dabate are cherry picking facts in order to further their point of view. Lynas would not have a career if it wasn't for global warming. I had difficulty in finishing the book. It is more about idealism than realism and is the sum total of one persons interpretation of the science to date. Yes we should be concerned about climate change especially as humans are almost certainly having an adverse effect. But climate has always changed to a degree. We live in a dynamic world. What about the Medieval warm period which many choose to ignore? What will we do if we solve the warming problem and create another ice age? Lynas, Monbiot, Flannery et al make it sound so easy to cure. I do think these guys actually think we can control the Earth's climate! We can't even forecast the weather accurately beyond the next few days. For some real totally unbiased evaluation of the data which in itself is uncomforable reading buy "Plows Plagues and Petroleum" by Bill Ruddiman.
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20 of 49 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Playing loose and fast with science, 30 May 2009
By 
MisterHobgoblin (Melbourne) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I am not an eco-nut. Mark Lynas is.

In Six Degrees, Mark Lynas sets out to compile all the scientific data to show what the effects would be of warming the world, one degree at a time, from one to six degrees celsius. This is a worthwhile exercise. People see that the temperature varies by way more than six degrees between morning and afternoon; from season to season; from day to day. There is a real job to do in persuading people that global warming is not about being warmer, it's about the potential collapse of ecosystems.

However, that's the end of the praise.

In trying to turn scientific evidence into popular language, Lynas loses the scientific objectivity of the original articles. His writing is laden heavy with value judgements and emotive language. Some of it adds no information, it's just there to tug at heartstrings. For example: " When the Englishmen Craig Higgins and Victor Saunders left the Hornli hut at 4am on 15 July 2003, they had no idea that they would end the day being part of the biggest rescue on Switzerland's iconic Matterhorn" is about an inane a statement as you could make. Seriously, the book's full of this stuff.

When there is conflicting evidence from different studies, Lynas expands upon the one with the worst outcomes and dismisses the studies that don't fit his thesis with a flick of the wrist. There is no serious effort made to weigh up the evidence. I lost count of the number of times he plugged his previous book - High Tide - and found the repeated references to Lynas's globetrotting, his house in Oxfordshire, his prowess as an academic, diver and mountaineer somewhat wearying. For a man who doesn't like consumerism, he is remarkably proficient at it. But then this was a man who was interviewed in his own film (The Age of Stupid) so I hadn't expected objectivity to be the strong point of Six Degrees.

And after all this science-lite with the conclusions laid on a plate, illuminated by neon lights, the piece de resistance was Chapter 7 - Lynas's manifesto for change. This includes pearls of wisdom such as: "probably the worst wedge option of all is that of biofuels. Already corn derived ethanol is being blended into gasoline in the United States, ostensibly to reduce CO2 emissions, but in reality having more to do with subsidising the politically powerful farming lobby in `red' Republican states". This, one suspects, is at the heart of Lynas's agenda - attacking capitalism and the establishment - but without having to justify the argument. The mere mention of Republicans is deemed sufficient to clinch the argument. Sorry, but that's the sort of politics we left behind at school.

Is the climate changing? Perhaps. Is it manmade? Perhaps. Can we stop it? Perhaps. But Six Degrees doesn't shed much light on the subject. The climate change lobby does itself no favours with sloppy, partisan presentation of the evidence. Starting with the conclusion and searching for the evidence to support it is indefensible.
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27 of 94 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Usual anthropogenic hype, 2 April 2008
By 
Robert G. Heath "CIRSED" (Near London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Another silly book which overlooks basic physics of climate change. How do i know? I work in climate physics. Climate forcing (temp change for doubling of CO2) is not a difficult concept, temperatures cannot go on rising just because of CO2 increasing. That's not how it works. You do not have to understand why, just remember that CO2 has been 15-20x more concentrated in the past and it was about same temp as now. It has been 3.5C warmer in the very recent past and CO2 levels were lower, as was SL. So where is the SL-temp-CO2 correlation? Also current rates of change of temperature are not out of the ordinary BY ANY MEANS. Sea level rises do not within certain bonds follow temperature changes up or down. 6C temperature rise would take massie changes in solar output, which will happen, but not for a few billion years. Learn some physics. I ride a bike to work so don't care for 4x4's but they are not the cause of climate change.
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9 of 46 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fiction, 30 Jan 2010
By 
Sean Houlihane (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Like much of the IPPC reports, this book draws heavily on the work of political advocacy groups. Does it matter if the science is cherry picked so long as it suits your personal interests or ideologies? Before jumping to conclusions about how bad it will be in the future, take some time to learn how uncertain our knowledge of the recent temperature is - and remember that we tend to have short memories.
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15 of 85 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars BAFFLED, 17 Jun 2008
One thing baffles me about this book by an evangelical warmista - and I wish Lynas would answer. He has not addressed one simple proven fact... that in the last 10 years the globe has been cooling quite markedly at a time when carbon emissions have never been higher. How does he square this with his alarmist views ? The fact is that a very great many reputable scientists the world over question whether anything we do has any effect on our climate - though clearly we pollute our environment and destroy the habitat for other creatures; but that is a different issue. The globe has warmed and cooled, warmed and cooled, for many billions of years and our climate has changed and will continue to change regardless of these tiny specks called humans.
Global warming was until around 2,000, since when the globe has been cooling. Will it warm up again ? Who knows ? There are only computer projections and we know those cannot not even get the long range weather forecast right for the British Isles
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6 of 43 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Six Degrees--Mark Lynas, 22 Dec 2009
By 
B. J. Bull "eltorro" (wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
As a confirmed anti climate change,man made global warming skeptic I found this book unreadable, and more like a science fiction novel, I read about a quarter and had to put it down, very doubtful if I shall return to it. Really suprised that it received ''Winner--Prizes for Science Books 08'' from the Royal Institution. A scaremongering book of the first order.
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6 of 60 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars six degrees, 14 April 2009
It has been six degrees warmer before. When the Romans were here they had massive vineyards in the north of England. Yes we are experiencing "Global
Warming" but it will not be mankinds downfall and it is not caused by CO2.
So buy some land and order some vines and dont worry
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Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet
Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet by Mark Lynas (Paperback - 19 Mar 2007)
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