Customer Reviews

8
3.9 out of 5 stars
Dark Water
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£9.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Harper Collins edition of Dark Water contains seven stories, excluding the prologue and epilogue. The stories are quite short, and often much of the story is spent steadily building tension. This works really well, as I found that I had a sense of unease building, when things started to go wrong.
If you are expecting a mirror of the film, Dark Water, then you will probably be disappointed. The story, Floating Water is a much more subtle, shorter version of the film. You can definitely see elements of The Ring in some of these stories, not least the author's preoccupation with water.
I for one would like to see more of Suzuki's work published in English, as well as other Japanese horror.
The stories, Adrift and Forest Under the Sea really stand out for me; both involve the main protagonist being trapped on their own; at sea, and in a cave. I definitely regret reading those late at night!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 16 January 2008
Although many others who have reviewed this book have managed to find fault with it in some way, I do not share the same attitude. Though other customers may well have read a lot more books than me and more specifically, have read other books by Koji Suzuki, I do not have the luxury of having suzuki's back catalogue of other material to base my opinions of this book on. Therefore, as a newcomer to his style of writing, (with the exception of having read the cult classic Ring) I hope to convey a far less pessimistic attitude towards this book, Dark water.

Let me begin with saying as a student, this kind of book works perfectly for me. It is broken up in to short stories, allowing for bite-sized chunks of reading easily digestible yet not time consuming. Sometimes with other books, on returning to them when I've found the time, I must re-read pages just to remember what's going on, but with dark water I could finish a tale and then later come back to begin a new one, allowing for an enjoyable and exciting treat each time.
Having seen the film dark water (the japanese version), I was dissapointed with the length of the tale from which the film originated in the book, however, taken into account the relatively small number of pages this story occupies, I feel the story's tension and creepyness does not suffer as a result of its length. In this book less is definitely more.
Each story is similar in length but on each page, Suzuki conveys, and describes so much, carefully picking his words to convey everything from the deep emotions of each character to the environments they inhabit. He has written a relatively short book - which is decieving, as it is in fact packed with detailed and genuinly creepy tales, each of which I thoroughly enjoyed.
These are my own personal views on this book, but as a newcomer to Suzuki's works, Dark Water has managed to hook me in, further beckoning me to read some of his other books.

For anyone who hasn't been scared by a book for a while, this is perfect!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
I have read the "Ring" trilogy, discovering Koji Suzuky and decided to read what else I coluld find of him, well translated, for I don't know Japanese. I have happened to love his breathless, but daily settings, and his way of involving the reader. Besides, I am no reader of horror stories, and after Poe, Stevenson, Lovecraft, Stocker and some other classics, I didn't read much, for, thanks to the little I tried to taste, there is just a satisfactory (for the writers or the editors?) wish to scare, mostly through splatter filthy things.
This is a collection of short stories that, like the three "Ring" novels keeps the attention of the reader high, without falling in easy horrifying chills running through the spine. I found them a way to get closer to a world so different from my "Western eye" (the connection with Joseph Conrad is wanted!) with intelligence, through a good piece of literature; prometheic sparcles of self questioning. Another way of thinking, another borderless mithology from which surely the writer has "fished". The whole collection no doubt pushes to think, to enrich, to wonder, and it makes me remember the disperation of the sad Frankenstein running monster/soul as it appears in Mary Shelley's story. Worth to be read with attention. If not, Suzuky seems able to catch the reader's one anyway, startin from where one never would think of the presence of upsetting facts, and taking him wit a gentle but firm hand, until to an always unespected end! Great.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 8 June 2013
Love Koji Suzuki's books. This is one of the best ones, apart from the ring trilogy books. this book is up there with those books
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 7 March 2015
Creepy but most stories were fairly predictable
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Water. It gives life, but can take it away. We need it, but it can also kill us in countless ways. And it's the center of "Dark Water," Koji Suzuki's collection of short stories. While the now-legendary "Ring" author has a knack for visceral horror, he just isn't in his element when writing shorts.

The most prominent story is "Floating Water," which has already been made into the film "Honogurai mizu no soko kara" and is being remade for American audiences, starring Jennifer Connelly. Newly-divorced Yoshimi and her daughter Ikuko move into a run-down apartment building, where a little girl vanished two years before.

But Suzuki doesn't descend to cheap ghosts here. Ikuko finds a "Hello Kitty" bag, which Yoshimi forces her to get rid of. But the bag keeps reappearing on the roof, and Ikuko has started talking with an imaginary playmate. Yoshimi starts to wonder -- what happened to that little girl, and where is she now, if she is haunting the building?

The other short stories continue the "water" theme: a young teacher discovers a cruel friend left something on an abandoned island. An abusive fisherman finds that he did something terrible while he was drunk -- and his victim takes her revenge. Spelunkers, boats and sailors take parts in the other stories... always near water.

Koji Suzuki is rightly called Japan's answer to Stephen King. In fact, he may well be better than King is. Where other horror authors use cheap chills and gore, Suzuki's stark storytelling keeps it clean. He frightens us with cruelty, with delusions, with looming curses, and with ghosts that the lead characters never actually see.

Unfortunately, "Dark Water's" short stories just don't gel. Suzuki doesn't get any time to build up suspense or character development, making the stories feel hollow. And most of them -- most glaringly the first -- ends abruptly. It's like walking down a sidewalk, only to suddenly fall into a pit. Perhaps only "The Hold," one of the most unpleasant stories, has a satisfying finale.

However, Suzuki's excellent style makes it worth reading. Everything and everyone is muted and understated, except for the sense of impending disaster and/or suspense hanging over each story. If fans of Suzuki read it solely for his style, then this is definitely a winner.

Unfortunately, "Dark Water" is not up to the standards of Suzuki's full-length novels. However, it's still a creepy, watery experience.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Water. It gives life, but can take it away. We need it, but it can also kill us in countless ways. And it's the center of "Dark Water," Koji Suzuki's collection of short stories. While the now-legendary "Ring" author has a knack for visceral horror, he just isn't in his element when writing shorts.
The most prominent story is "Floating Water," which has already been made into the film "Honogurai mizu no soko kara" and is being remade for American audiences, starring Jennifer Connelly. Newly-divorced Yoshimi and her daughter Ikuko move into a run-down apartment building, where a little girl vanished two years before.
But Suzuki doesn't descend to cheap ghosts here. Ikuko finds a "Hello Kitty" bag, which Yoshimi forces her to get rid of. But the bag keeps reappearing on the roof, and Ikuko has started talking with an imaginary playmate. Yoshimi starts to wonder -- what happened to that little girl, and where is she now, if she is haunting the building?
The other short stories continue the "water" theme: a young teacher discovers a cruel friend left something on an abandoned island. An abusive fisherman finds that he did something terrible while he was drunk -- and his victim takes her revenge. Spelunkers, boats and sailors take parts in the other stories... always near water.
Koji Suzuki is rightly called Japan's answer to Stephen King. In fact, he may well be better than King is. Where other horror authors use cheap chills and gore, Suzuki's stark storytelling keeps it clean. He frightens us with cruelty, with delusions, with looming curses, and with ghosts that the lead characters never actually see.
Unfortunately, "Dark Water's" short stories just don't gel. Suzuki doesn't get any time to build up suspense or character development, making the stories feel hollow. And most of them -- most glaringly the first -- ends abruptly. It's like walking down a sidewalk, only to suddenly fall into a pit. Perhaps only "The Hold," one of the most unpleasant stories, has a satisfying finale.
However, Suzuki's excellent style makes it worth reading. Everything and everyone is muted and understated, except for the sense of impending disaster and/or suspense hanging over each story. If fans of Suzuki read it solely for his style, then this is definitely a winner.
Unfortunately, "Dark Water" is not up to the standards of Suzuki's full-length novels. However, it's still a creepy, watery experience.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 24 July 2009
Widely considered to be Japan's equivalent of Stephen King, Suzuki is better known as the author of the Ring - cult-book-turned-cult-movie. In this book, he bases his tales of horror around the Tokyo-Yokohama bay. I should hasten to add that I wasn't horrified by any of the stories, although one or two had a couple of moments of causing me anxiety. The stories are supposedly recounted by a grandmother to a young girl, but little other than the omnipresence of water links them. And of course all the protagonists are somehow flawed, troubled people - if not abusive, then paranoid, or passive-aggressive. The story I liked the best is called 'Dream Cruise', in which an aggressive salesman and his irritating wife take his classmate, a somewhat laid-back and self-satisfied fellow, on a cruise, with a view to recruiting him to their pyramidal sales scheme. The horrors that await the salesman and his wife when they encounter a child's shoe in the sea and their boat snags on something are music to my ears... Suzuki's interested in the people's back-stories, and he expends pages elucidating this or that aspect of their characters. The plots then begin to thin a bit, and it appears as if - story after story - he loses patience, and attempts to wrap it all up. His attempts at a twist at the end are not entirely fortuitous. I can't tell if the prose is leaden because of the translation, or if it is a particular trait of the Japanese short story. At any rate, this is not a book to savour slowly; on the other hand, reading the stories in rapid succession results in a melded confusion.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Ring
Ring by Koji Suzuki (Paperback - 2007)
£14.99

Loop
Loop by Koji Suzuki (Paperback - 29 July 2011)
£14.99

Spiral
Spiral by Koji Suzuki (Paperback - 2007)
£9.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.