Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scathingly personal and honest autobiography
For my money, not that my money adds up to much, the finest English batsman of the last fifteen years the sight of Graham Thorpe striding to the crease was my personal barometer that everything was going to be alright. We( We meaning England) might be 36 for 3 but once flinty doughty Thorpey was in the middle I always felt reassured that all was not lost and a gritty...
Published on 19 Jan 2006 by russell clarke

versus
2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear!
Goodness me. I could not read this book without cringing. Graham (a cricketer I have long admired) seems utterly unable to go more than a few pages without force feeding the reader more information about his marital break up and his wife's unreasonableness.

Will his wife get the opportunity to put pen to paper for more than a hundred pages with her side of the...
Published on 16 Aug 2006 by Mr. Tim Doyle


Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scathingly personal and honest autobiography, 19 Jan 2006
By 
russell clarke "stipesdoppleganger" (halifax, west yorks) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
For my money, not that my money adds up to much, the finest English batsman of the last fifteen years the sight of Graham Thorpe striding to the crease was my personal barometer that everything was going to be alright. We( We meaning England) might be 36 for 3 but once flinty doughty Thorpey was in the middle I always felt reassured that all was not lost and a gritty innings renaissance would soon be underway. Of course that wasn’t always the case but it says a lot about Thorpe’s admirable fighting qualities, unflappable demeanour and sheer talent that I always thought it would be. And I’m no optimist by nature I can tell you. I was a little trepidatious that his autobiography would somehow make me think less of him, a bit like when you meet an idol in the flesh. Thankfully that isn’t the case , indeed it makes me feel I know him better as a person which I suppose is the point of an autobiography . It’s the most deeply personal account of a player’s life I’ve ever read and in many ways reflects his character as a player being compact, honest and entertaining in a non-extravagant way with the occasional flash of eye catching prose.
It’s not told in the usual strict chronological sense and deals very briefly with his childhood which is fair enough as most people aren’t that interested in players formative years. It does conclude with his exclusion from the last Ashes squad which even though we won , I still think was an error by the selectors and no surprise Thorpe thinks so too, though he does with typical candour admit his fitness would have been a problem , his back restricting his mobility to some degree.
Where it really excels is as an examination of a top sportsman mental struggle both with himself and his turbulent domestic circumstances as a result of protracted divorce proceedings. Scathingly direct, he tells how he came to the point where cricket meant less to him than his next alcohol and nicotine fix and how his circumstances lead to him approaching the game in a less intense more carefree manner leading to the golden period when he returned to test cricket against South Africa. Thorpe’s ex-wife comes in for some stick which is not surprising if events transpired as he described but I’m always a bit uncomfortable with this knowing only too well there are two sides to every story. Still she did choose the tabloids to tell her side of things ,most of which Thorpe refutes and in the end he comes across as dignified and willing to forgive which when you consider his paternity problems is something to really admire.
Rising From The Ashes is by no means the most entertaining autobiography I’ve read, but like I said it’s the most personal and though it lacks the salacious stories and spiky gossip of many sports memoirs which lets be honest is what most of us read them for ( I loved the fact he and Nasser Hussain used to sit in the TV area of the dressing room giggling at the things the commentators said though) this is still a riveting read .I loved Graham Thorpe as a cricketer, now I really like him as a person. Hope he and his family are all healthy and happy, that he finds something he enjoys doing and that his central heating doesn’t break down this winter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars as good a sports biography as I've read, 17 Sep 2005
This review is from: Graham Thorpe: Rising from the Ashes (Hardcover)
Thorpe's Test performances over the years have been a source of joy-upon-joy to me, and it's fair to say I approached this with caution, wary of a potentially harrowing account that might throw a less satisfactory light on some glorious moments in recent cricket history. Instead, I found myself absolutely riveted by a powerful story I quite simply couldn't put down. This desperately human face behind a sporting hero is one I found genuinely inspiring. Thorpe's account of his life and career is told with courageous honesty, a very real sense of responsibility, and fascinating insight into the world of a professional sportsman. Thorpe's great legacy to cricket was that quiet, unspectacular ability to grab hold of hope in the midst of hopelessness; there's something of that reflected here. I expected something less than a sports autobiography; instead, I got something very much more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very personal autobiography, 20 Oct 2006
By 
Greg Farefield-Rose (Hertfordshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Unlike the recent autobiographies by Mike Atherton and Nasser Hussain, Graham Thorpe's tome does not offer a detailed match-by-match analysis of English cricket over his playing career. Indeed cricket is not the primary motivation behind Thorpe writing his memoirs.

The main raison d'etre of Rising From The Ashes is for Graham to tell his side of the story of his disintegrating marriage, the stress of which twice led him to withdraw from the England team for lengthy periods. In doing this, it candidly illustrates the mountains of despair that even a highly successful sportsman can reach when faced with insurmountable personal problems. Although it can be argued that these lengthy ruminations are tabloidesque, Thorpe should also be praised for his honesty - unlike his ex-wife who comes out of the book with very little credit as she continues to deny Graham basic access to their two children.

Despite Thorpe's failing marriage and battle to see his children being the main motivation behind him writing his memoirs, Rising From The Ashes also offers an interesting though slightly disjointed analysis of his cricketing career. Not as detailed or definitive as Atherton or Hussain's books but it never would have been as Graham was England captain on only a couple of occasions.

Rising From The Ashes is a passionate page-turner though not the book to read first if you are looking for an insider's account of the England cricket team during the 90s and early noughties. An honest and almost uncomfortably personal sporting autobiography.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tough going at times, 20 July 2006
By 
DavyA (Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Thorpe , "The Little Genius" as Nasser Hussain used to call him - superb batsmen & complicated person - charts his career well enough but it's the theme of his marriage break up & it's repercussions on his ability to play cricket which also make up a good chunk of this book. The lad went through the mill.

Read it & see the human face of a fantastic cricketer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chalky comes good, 16 Oct 2006
I have been a fan of Graham Thorpe for many years, it was his way with the bat that convinced me how amazing the game of cricket is, and 15 years later I still have the same passion.

I decided to read Thorpes' autobiography to get his side of the story that plauged his career near retirement. He paints an honest picture of a man in torment, a man who by all accounts of the media, kept his cards close to his chest. He doesn't mince his words. Thorpe doesn't dwell on the past having moved on, but describes the lead up to the end of his marriage and the near break-down that eventually proved to be his salvation.

This book is a must for all Thorpey Fans, to read about his point of view and perhaps a legacy to leave his children that he so clearly adores.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ITS' GOOD, 3 Sep 2006
This is a very open account of the trials and tribulations of a great batsman for both Surrey and England.

Yes it is full of his personal problems, with the break up of his marriage, but this was clearly an very important aspect of his career and needed to be covered. It affected him greatly and for one I have a much better understanding of the 'will-he, won't-he' saga of his test career.

Warning, once you start, it will be difficult to put down!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review, 14 Sep 2005
By 
S. Hansford "fairywings" (Tewkesbury) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Graham Thorpe: Rising from the Ashes (Hardcover)
I first read parts of this book in a national paper and decided I had to read it. It is a very good book, which details Graham Thrope life as a cricketer. I was unable to put the book once I started reading it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear!, 16 Aug 2006
By 
Mr. Tim Doyle (harrogate) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Goodness me. I could not read this book without cringing. Graham (a cricketer I have long admired) seems utterly unable to go more than a few pages without force feeding the reader more information about his marital break up and his wife's unreasonableness.

Will his wife get the opportunity to put pen to paper for more than a hundred pages with her side of the story? Of course not. It's not that I am over sympathetic to her (she has sold out to the red tops) but using your autobiography to score points like this is cheap and distasteful.

I feel desperately sorry for Graeme's estranged children who will have to read this one day.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Graham Thorpe: Rising from the Ashes
Graham Thorpe: Rising from the Ashes by Graham Thorpe (Hardcover - 5 Sep 2005)
Used & New from: 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews